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Fake Cake Policy for heavy/large cakes?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hey everyone,

     I was looking at some amazing cake websites this weekend and found a well-established amazing caker who has a fake cake policy for larger/heavier cakes. After 4-tiers, the rest of the cake is styrofoam because of weight issues. Do any of you do something like this??

 

I ask because I own a home business and so I am baker, caker, decorator, delivery-lady, everything. My weight limit is usually a 4-tier round cake or a 3-tier square cake and I almost always deliver the cakes fully assembled (I don't have time to step up on site and I don't like the added pressure of guests watching me like I'm on a TV show). I don't want to hire people just for deliveries and for now, I've gotten away with asking someone at the venue to help but I hate doing that.

 

Any thoughts on implementing a policy like this? Pros, Cons, Advice? :) Thanks everyone!

Jennifer

post #2 of 9

you might want to consider a cart with wheels--not ideal for every situation but works for almost all

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post #3 of 9

No, I wouldn't consider a policy like this for any reason. As suggested above, maybe get a cart or allow yourself extra time for setup, and just take your time. Ideally, you want to be setting up before people are there anyways. The people watching, who? Servers and staff? They're busy being nervous about their own stuff. Gives you a chance to chat and see how they do things, and hear things about the other people that come thru with cakes.

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*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
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post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I bought one a while back but nearly all of the venues I usually deliver to have to be taken upstairs or downstairs and just not worth bringing the cart. Thank you for the suggestion though! :)

post #5 of 9
That is a weird policy! I have done a 7 tier, I just had the bottom 2 together, the middle 2 together, and top 3 together, with supports on them. All I had to do at the venue was stack them and do the 2 borders. But I hate stacking at room temp, and prefer to freeze first so my fingers don't mess them up.

I do have my hubby to help me most of the time, and my 2 oldest are old enough to stay home, but I have had to bring my little ones twice icon_redface.gif . (They stayed in the car, windows cracked, doors locked, engine off, and with a cell phone. No longer than 8 minutes. Oldest was 8, youngest 3. ) I had a young kid who was setting tables stand by the door at one venue, and at the other a lady had just walked out to smoke, and I asked her to watch the car. We were back before the cigarette was gone. But we got lucky!

One thing you could do, that i have been considering, is hire someone for the deliveries. Just give them the delivery fee, and let them drive your delivery vehicle, if it has a sign. They would need training, of course. Have you seen those guys on cake boss put those big 5 tier cakes up on one shoulder? (By their greasy face and hair! Gag!) I would kill for some upper body strength like that, but don't want to look crazy, lol!

I wonder if a job like that could qualify for bonding, where they have to put Up money they will lose if something happens?
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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post

No, I wouldn't consider a policy like this for any reason. As suggested above, maybe get a cart or allow yourself extra time for setup, and just take your time. Ideally, you want to be setting up before people are there anyways. The people watching, who? Servers and staff? They're busy being nervous about their own stuff. Gives you a chance to chat and see how they do things, and hear things about the other people that come thru with cakes.

 

i agree invaluable networking time--this is one of my favorite parts of the endeavor--everything is rather hushed and quiet--surroundings and people are becoming more and more beautiful--folks are concentrating, happy and expectant--the calm before the beautiful storm of a lovely celebration

Quote:
Originally Posted by SaltCakeCity View Post

Yeah, I bought one a while back but nearly all of the venues I usually deliver to have to be taken upstairs or downstairs and just not worth bringing the cart. Thank you for the suggestion though! :)

 

for anyone else considering a cart-- maybe consider getting one that can go up and down the stairs with you--collapsible where you still have to carry each one separately from the steps up but sometimes even just getting some relief from the effort helps

 

i remember this one delivery--i've described it here before--it was a bit of a downhill/uphill driveway full with vehicles blocking the entrance into a beautiful house where the dang hallway wound 'round and 'round while the cake grew heavier and heavier--it was just a three tier but it was a loooooong way--got to the table --finally--breathless aching for relief--and the homeowner steps in front of me and says--can you guarantee me that that will not scratch the top of my table

 

oh man all sorts of thoughts were trying to push through my lips like, i can guarantee you:

 

  •  that you should have thought of this earlier

 

  • that if you had put a %$&* talbecloth on the table we would not be having this ridiculous importune discussion

 

  • that i'm gonna drop it on your fricken foot if you don't get the he77 out of my way icon_biggrin.gif

 

they were very proud of thier table--it was beautiful all inlaid frufru stuff--they did not want to cover it up--they wanted to show off the table during the event--wow

 

they place a folded kitchen towel to set it on that peaked out from beneath the $600 cake--for real

 

i mean i had no intention of harming any of their furniture--but man what timing and what a terrycloth resolution

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post #7 of 9

I would not consider that kind of policy.  As others agreed, I do cakes of all sizes.  I assemble anything over 3 tiers on site.  Every now & then, someone wants to watch.  I used to have my husband stand guard like an FBI agent.  In his deep firm voice, he would tell them to please stay back.  Now, he stays outside playing with our son.

 

Also, to avoid situations similar to K8's, I always first walk the venue.  I take in my camera & emergency bag.  I physically check out the table, clear a nice path, & warn the staff I will be bringing in the cake.  Learned to do that the hard way, but has certainly saved me a great deal of grief.

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It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

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www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
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post #8 of 9
DeliciousDesserts walking the venue is what I refer to as "the cake walk". I use a cart for large cskes and that cake walk helps me notice all the obstacles along the way!
Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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Making life sweet!

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Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts View Post

I would not consider that kind of policy.  As others agreed, I do cakes of all sizes.  I assemble anything over 3 tiers on site.  Every now & then, someone wants to watch.  I used to have my husband stand guard like an FBI agent.  In his deep firm voice, he would tell them to please stay back.  Now, he stays outside playing with our son.

 

Also, to avoid situations similar to K8's, I always first walk the venue.  I take in my camera & emergency bag.  I physically check out the table, clear a nice path, & warn the staff I will be bringing in the cake.  Learned to do that the hard way, but has certainly saved me a great deal of grief.

 

 

yeah i usually do too--it was a house--how hard could that be

 

and i was part of the catering company that was swarming all over the place at that time

 

the table issue could have been handled at any given point before i arrived with it

 

either we were running late or the guests were all early

 

woulda been fine if not for the homeowner with the ego wrapped around his table

one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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