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Dobord Alternative...Achieving even cookie thickness - Page 2

post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis View Post

 

iron? <thud.> i fainted  icon_biggrin.gif i'm way too lazy for that ;)--slap it on the table & go go go

 

That would have worked if I'd dried it flat, but I dried it to very dry in the dryer, so it came out all crumpled.

 

A hint I learned (not all that long ago), is to put the pastry cloth in the freezer for a while before you roll out pie crust or whatever. It helps to keep the fat component from melting while you're working with it.

There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

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There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

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post #17 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter View Post

 

That would have worked if I'd dried it flat, but I dried it to very dry in the dryer, so it came out all crumpled.

 

A hint I learned (not all that long ago), is to put the pastry cloth in the freezer for a while before you roll out pie crust or whatever. It helps to keep the fat component from melting while you're working with it.

that's an excellent hint to freeze it

 

but i meant i would not use it--no patience ;)

 

i'm too lazy to iron something like that-- i'd just roll it out on the squeaky clean counter or table top, place mat, waxed paper

 

icon_biggrin.gif

bad artists copy, good artists steal
pablo picasso

 

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bad artists copy, good artists steal
pablo picasso

 

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post #18 of 46

K8 - I use my pastry cloth for pie and cookies and then I use a seperate one for the doggy biscuits... I find it is a great piece of cloth... I get them at BBB and it usually comes with a rolling pin sock which to be honest I never use...

post #19 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter View Post

 

That would have worked if I'd dried it flat, but I dried it to very dry in the dryer, so it came out all crumpled.

 

A hint I learned (not all that long ago), is to put the pastry cloth in the freezer for a while before you roll out pie crust or whatever. It helps to keep the fat component from melting while you're working with it.

That is a brilliant idea... think I may have to borrow it...

post #20 of 46

vic--what's bbb? oh wait i got it--bed bath & beyond!

 

i should prolly try this some day before i bequeath my rolling pins to the kids ;)

 

we gotta ways to go!!!

bad artists copy, good artists steal
pablo picasso

 

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bad artists copy, good artists steal
pablo picasso

 

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post #21 of 46

I always use both the pastry cloth and the rolling pin cover. A little flour on the cloth and the pin cover works its way into the fibers - no sticking and not much excess flour to shake off the cloth when done. I'm not the only one who finds this way much easier than just rolling out on a counter or cutting board. However, I do like the idea of rolling out cookies on parchment paper, taking away the excess and just sticking the parchment, with the cookies, on a sheet and put it in the oven, rather than handling the cookies so much.

 

Putting the pastry cloth in the freezer: Anyone may use that idea; I got it from someone else. In fact, there are people who just always store their pastrycloth in the freezer.

There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

Reply

There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

Reply
post #22 of 46

Don't you hate Friday when your brain does not engage... glad you got BBB... I use to work there and that is what I got in the habit of calling it... will have to retrain to write it out.

post #23 of 46

For cookies, I have even used chopsticks when I didn't have anything else around!  I just put two of them with the pointed sides side by side to keep the it the same height as the flat part.  It worked in a pinch and I had tons of them to put around the dough!  I also use wax paper to roll/cool dough and then cut them out when they are set.  I bake on parchment though.  I love my pastry cloths for pie dough and have several on hand for busy days!  Also, if you go the lumber yard instead of a hobby shop, you can find longer lengths of square stock in the millwork section.  I also had a lady in one of our sugar classes use a LARGE pvc pipe as a rolling pin.  You can make them as long as you like.  Since I always have a top sheet of wax paper on top of my cookies, I think that I would not mind trying it for larger areas that my big fondant roller don't cover.  

post #24 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:

 

That is where I ordered from. Never have before but apparently their site isn't up to date. And they mentioned having computer problems which kind of sounded like someone doesn't know how to process the online orders. They asked me what I had ordered and then mentioned they are no longer making it. They sold the stock they had and the couple that was making them stopped making them. So they are in process of making a similar version which is supposed to be out in a few months and they'd call me then to see if i'd be interested in purchasing. I wish their site had all that info to begin with! I was so excited to buy it finally! In the meantime, I'm thinking of just making my own! LOL...Large pastry board and attaching slats or dowels to it. Square dowels that is. LOL.

<3 Monica
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<3 Monica
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post #25 of 46

I have a few friends who swear by one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Joseph-Adjustable-Rolling-Pin-Green/dp/B001VC4PW0

It's 16 1/2" long.

post #26 of 46

I have different thickness of sticks about a foot long and place them on a silicone mat at two sides only.  The mat holds the sticks and I use the long fondant roller resting on both sides on top of the sticks.  Excellent results.  The silicone mat is easier to clean than a dough board, cheese cloth or dough cloth.

You could achieve different thicknesses by stacking flat rulers on top of each other.

Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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post #27 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKing12 View Post

I have different thickness of sticks about a foot long and place them on a silicone mat at two sides only.  The mat holds the sticks and I use the long fondant roller resting on both sides on top of the sticks.  Excellent results.  The silicone mat is easier to clean than a dough board, cheese cloth or dough cloth.

You could achieve different thicknesses by stacking flat rulers on top of each other.

 Like the blue ateco mat? I have that. Maybe I'll use that. 

<3 Monica
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<3 Monica
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post #28 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti View Post

I have a few friends who swear by one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Joseph-Adjustable-Rolling-Pin-Green/dp/B001VC4PW0

It's 16 1/2" long.

I thought about purchasing this before I ordered the Dobord. I saw it at JCPenney. Only thing I'm afraid of with that is that it doesn't have handles like a regular rolling pin. At this point I don't care anymore. Lol. I just finished a big cookie order & now I'm onto my sisters baby shower! The family keeps me busy. Lol

<3 Monica
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<3 Monica
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post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsMonica View Post

I thought about purchasing this before I ordered the Dobord. I saw it at JCPenney. Only thing I'm afraid of with that is that it doesn't have handles like a regular rolling pin. At this point I don't care anymore. Lol. I just finished a big cookie order & now I'm onto my sisters baby shower! The family keeps me busy. Lol

 

 

i think this rolling pin is the bombshabomb--it's the best of the dobord world imo

 

because with the dobord you gotta wiggly around with the paper or foil on the top of the db and it's much easier to roll out on the table/counter top

 

and if i used my silicone mat under there i'd cut it and i'd have to hurt something :) again :{

 

one of the screws is stripped on my db and removing the inner board to line it all up is pain--too fiddly--four thicknesses on this fiddly one

 

and mine was only $65 too

 

i use that pin with my dough onto parchment or foil--do my cut outs and remove the excess--bake on that same paper/foil--easy peasy

 

and don't worry about not having handles--you only gotta do two or three swipes with the pin and you got it-

you kinda feel guilty not having to mess around with it more -- 'wait--we're there already??  icon_biggrin.gif that was too easy' you'll think!!!

 

you can let your dough get nice & work-ably soft and not have to arm wrestle it to get it rolled out

 

it's not like rolling fondant without handles--that would be hellish torture

 

i don't think you could be disappointed with this pin and you'll be be eighty bucks richer!!!

 

if those nice thickness guides fall off or you loose one--getcha some rulers!!!!

bad artists copy, good artists steal
pablo picasso

 

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bad artists copy, good artists steal
pablo picasso

 

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post #30 of 46
Thread Starter 

SOLD! lol. I was thinking it'd be like my fondant roller. That IS hellish! 

{on my way to JCP!} 

<3 Monica
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<3 Monica
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