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VERY NEW TO CAKE BAKING---- red velvet 2 tier wedding cake coming up in march--HELP - Page 2

post #16 of 71
You can make the shells by using chocolate candy melts and molds. I prefer Merkins.That is the ez part and they store well for weeks. I use straws for support and put the cake on a rubber mat in my very clean trunk to transport. The cake is relatively simple. I think the hard part and most intensive is the dessers.
post #17 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by firechickrn08 View Post

She wants a two tier... With three layers for each.. She kinda likes the short stocky look... Won't it be much taller by the time we add all layers?

There are two ways to get three layers per tier.

 

One way is to bake three cakes. Deeper cake = higher total. This enhances the short stocky look your customer wants. The other way is to slice deep layers across into thinner layers.  But I think you know what your bride wants. 

 

If the baked/level depth of each cake is about 1.5 inches, the final height with filling and icing will be over 5" and just using rigid dowels for a 2 tier cake will be OK. 

 

If the cakes are each 2" deep then you might need internal layers of cardboard circles for support as well as dowels.

 

And let me remind you to use the magic cake strips for baking all cakes, the strips prevent the humps on top. The strips last 2-3 years if you don't run them through the washing machine (washing takes off that useful aluminum coating).

post #18 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene View Post

There are two ways to get three layers per tier.

 

One way is to bake three cakes. Deeper cake = higher total. This enhances the short stocky look your customer wants. The other way is to slice deep layers across into thinner layers.  But I think you know what your bride wants. 

 

If the baked/level depth of each cake is about 1.5 inches, the final height with filling and icing will be over 5" and just using rigid dowels for a 2 tier cake will be OK. 

 

If the cakes are each 2" deep then you might need internal layers of cardboard circles for support as well as dowels.

 

And let me remind you to use the magic cake strips for baking all cakes, the strips prevent the humps on top. The strips last 2-3 years if you don't run them through the washing machine (washing takes off that useful aluminum coating).

 

 

Irene,

 

i don't understand

 

you always need internal cardboard circles when you dowel

one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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post #19 of 71

I think she means if all three cakes are 2 inches thick then the total tier would be well over 6 inches and may need an additional cardboard/dowel layer in between, that is how I took it anyway.

post #20 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by denetteb View Post

I think she means if all three cakes are 2 inches thick then the total tier would be well over 6 inches and may need an additional cardboard/dowel layer in between, that is how I took it anyway.

YES that is exactly what I mean.

 

To clarify to the OP: if you have three slices of cake and each slice is 1.5" thin or less, then the whole stack with icing in between acts as one tier.  I never put  cardboard between those slices.  There is of course a circle of bakers cardboard under each stack. Look at the Wilton link that you arleady have for the exact picture.

 

In fact I routinely stack 6 layers 1/2" thick of cake with buttercream. Again it comes to a total of about 5".  Once this kind of stack has chilled then you can ski down a hill with it, and it stays in perfect shape.

 

When your total (say of your 10" diameter cakes) of cake is 6" high before the icing, then you need to add at least one layer of cardboard along with the layers of cake and icing in the middle of the height. Plus the bakers circles at the bottom of each tier.

post #21 of 71

Boy, Irene, I want to see you skiing with your cake!

post #22 of 71

Does anyone but me see a potential problem with all this?  The OP has a HUGE wedding cake order that includes items other than just a wedding cake and she doesn't have any experience!  I posted a Red Velvet recipe for her but that is the least of her concerns.  If this is a legitimate post I encourage the OP to rethink doing it!  .

Keep in mind, if you're not a legal baker, the bride's venue can refuse your products.  You've never stacked a cake...you don't know what sizes to use.  Don't know your decorating expertise so can't comment on that...but do you really want to accept the huge responsibility of doing what amounts to the entire centerpiece of a wedding reception when you've never done anything like this?  

 

I always question these posts as being legitimate.  Huge order...no experience...help.  Seems like I've seen a lot of those lately.  But just in case it is legit, think past your ego and more of what the bride will think if it's not perfect.   I know you said she's a 'whatever' kind of gal, but don't kid yourself.  If you turn up with something less than what she's envisioning on her wedding day, you're screwed.   I personally wouldn't want someone who had no experience doing my wedding cake.   But because you may decorate on the side and do a nice job on birthday cakes and such, she thinks 'how hard can it be' for you to do a wedding cake!  And because of that she may also think she's getting off cheaper than using a bakery.    Far be it from me to discourage someone for wanting to expand their experience...but I'm going to be Debbie Downer on this.   It's one thing taking on a new technique you've never tried...or going for a large order.  It's another taking on an important event having no clue about how to do the basics.  Baby shower,  birthday....yeah.  Wedding...no. 

My opinion. 

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

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If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

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post #23 of 71
Quote:
edited to say after the fact here---that I apologize for this post--i opined in general--i was off on a tangent about when people ask for extreme cakes or sculpture instructions and i did not exactly diresct this to op and
i was wrong to say this this way--
i was waxing eloquent (trying to ;) on a pet peeve not at op

 

 

even though i often shape some kind of response

 

i'm usually aghast when someone says

 

oh i wanna do a cake in the shape of the panama canal with locks that rise & lower water, giant cargo ships with water skiers flying by on holiday in ermine and lace wet suits with the underwater welders making repairs to the boat bottoms covered with golden barnacles

 

and bubbles like champagne

 

i mean really? you're clueless and you agreed to do this?

 

that always does take me aback

 

although folks gotta start somewhere

 

some start at the top/high end for sure

 

the quality might not be all one would want

 

a laid back bride is often code for got no money so whatever


Edited by -K8memphis - 1/29/13 at 2:58pm
one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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post #24 of 71
Thread Starter 
To those of you who have given advice, thought, tips and recipes I am truly grateful!!! Yes this is a legit post... To those who have nothing but doubts... Yes this is a big order but its not impossible... No Ive never done it before but will conquer it in march... That's why I am asking for tips and helpful thoughts... I'd appreciate if you don't have advice that is helpful no need in replying.
post #25 of 71

sorry sorry sorry you are right--my bad!

 

din mean to be a debbie downer

 

just answering a bit off topic--not meaning you in particular but it is your post of course

 

sorry

 

i'm behind you a 1,000% icon_biggrin.gif

 

bake on

 

rock on

one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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post #26 of 71
Thread Starter 
Thank you! I will post pics of my journey icon_wink.gif
post #27 of 71

My advice to you would be to bake this cake a couple times and practice stacking and icing it. I take a cardboard circle the size of my top tier and press it lightly onto the bottom tier to map out where I'm going to place my top tier. This gives you a guide for your straws/dowels. For smaller cakes I use milkshake straws, but McDonald's straws are very sturdy, too ;) Stick 1 straw in the middle of your indented circle, then trim it to the top of your iced cake. Pull it out and cut all straws that same size. This will ensure a level top tier. Then pipe or slather some icing on top to "glue" down your top tier. Setting it on top of already crusted buttercream could cause it to slide later. I hope that makes sense. Also, I use scratch red velvet, but if the bride has okayed box, I think you should consider it. It is STURDY, where scratch is tender and crumbly and heavy. I agree with the previous poster who said just replace the water with buttermilk. I have had great success making my cake pop balls in advance  and freezing them. I freeze them on a sheet pan, then ziplock them so they don't stick together. You have your hands full! Best of luck to you. I would also make the cake as small as possible. With all those other goodies it sounds like the cake is more of a photo op than anything. Practice that rose technique by turning a pot or bowl upside down and frosting it over and over. Then you can just scrape it off and do it again!

post #28 of 71

Sorry, but If you're going to post on here for advice you can expect all kinds.    I'm a hobbyist with probably a lot more cake experience than you and I would not take this order.  But that is just me.   As I said in my post, it was my OPINION.   I myself had a wedding caketastrophe and don't wish that on anyone.    I am throwing a warning out there because you need to be aware of EVERYTHING before you jump into something of this magnitude.  It's not just the cake...it's all the other stuff you have to make in addition to the cake that is concerning.   How are you planning on delivering everything?   Do you have enough room to make and store everything? Are you going to try to cover with fondant or smooth buttercream?  Plan on everything taking a LOT longer than you think.   Not everything goes smoothly and time management is crucial.

 

But first, you really need to find out if the venue the bride is using will allow your stuff.  Many won't if you're not a licensed business.   If you're as new as you say you are to all of this, then you're probably  not legal  and you're opening yourself up to all kinds of problems if someone gets sick and decides to sue you.  But I don't know...you could live somewhere where you don't have to worry about that...I hope so.  

 

I'm all for taking on new challenges but I personally think a wedding is too important an event to take a chance with.  I remember shopping for my daughter's wedding cake before I got into this and how important it was to her that her cake be a centerpiece.  You're not only planning on the cake, but a whole table full of stuff.  That's a lot to take on for someone who says they are 'very new' to baking.   Sorry I'm not all rainbows and puppies but I've seen enough horrible wedding cakes on here (sorry no names) and  CakeWrecks  (not to mention my own personal disaster) that it bears consideration and at least a second thought before jumping into something that may be over your head.  It's up to you in the end.   And if you go forward you'd better practice, practice and practice.   Go on YouTube for tutorials.   Make stacked cakes and take them to work.  That way you can practice your delivery skills as well. 

 

I hope it works out for you.  Just consider EVERYTHING when going forward.  It's a lot easier to anticipate a problem and already know how to face it than to have it surprise you.

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply
post #29 of 71
/agree with Carmajok.

We all want to be encouraging. We all wish & hope for the best & will gladly offer tips & advice.

However, there is cause for concern. I would t recommend anyone cloning Kilimanjaro for a first climb. I also wouldn't encourage this big an order for a first wedding cake.

www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
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www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
Reply
post #30 of 71
Oops at the typos! That should be "wouldn't" & "climbing"

www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
Reply

www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
Reply
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