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Tiered Cake Boxes.......???? - Page 2

post #16 of 26

Ok.. but Emily don't you leave a cake box with the client?  I leave cake boxes because often the client has left over cake that they will be taking with them and of course they want to transport it.

Virginia 323.253.8213
www.urbanainez.com
He is the man of my dreams, my prince; He gives me the desires of my heart, He completes me. His name is Jesus
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Virginia 323.253.8213
www.urbanainez.com
He is the man of my dreams, my prince; He gives me the desires of my heart, He completes me. His name is Jesus
Reply
post #17 of 26

I do leave boxes sometimes, just like sometimes the client picks up the cake instead of me delivering. But, it seems like most often, I'm delivering to someone's house (where the celebration will be held) and they have no need for the paper box. 

 

My carrier idea is definitely not going to work for every occasion, but I know I would use it pretty frequently. I'm just interested in other bakers' opinions as to whether or not they would find a use for it too! :)

post #18 of 26

I think your carrier is an interesting idea, Emily.  And I could see the use for it for short transports.  I however am concerned about how it would seal up and keep the cake air tight. I have had cupcake disasters with cupcakes kept sealed in a plastic carrier overnight as the moisture is trapped and causes the wrappers then to separate or the fondant decorations to wilt.  What I like about a clean cardboard box is that there seems to be a balance between the cardboard absorbing extra moisture and keeping the cake protected.  When i have fondant details on a cake i will also add a few silica pacs to the bottom of the box to absorb moisture. Would your plastic shell have air vents to allow for moisture to escape?   I also have had more of an issue with cake carriers smelling of plastic when sealed up than paper boxes smelling of cardboard.   But i'm sure that you are looking into a non-gassing, smell-proof plastic for this (too bad my Crate and Barrel big cupcake carrier didn't!) I also re-use my cardboard cake boxes for deliveries.  If the client needs it, i'll leave it (under $2 from walmart), otherwise i'll take it and reuse it a couple of times if it is still in good shape.  Another plus for cardboard is that I can store all my transport boxes in the space between two shelves. I don't think I have storage for a collection of plastic carriers at full size.  

 

I'm all for finding a great reusaeable product and I applaud your idea!  It does have some really good selling points, though maybe it wouldn't fit my situation and needs.  I wouldn't normally go on an be negative, but I'm just sharing feedback since you asked. 

post #19 of 26
Thank you for your feedback, Lorie! That's exactly what I'm looking for! My thought is this carrier would be used for short time frames, to reduce the moisture and "plastic smell." A vent might be a good option too, though!

Thanks again for taking the time to share your thoughts.
post #20 of 26
I live in Canada and can't.find stagged cake boxes...
post #21 of 26
Bakeabox.com

I don't leave those with the customer, but I do leave a pink cake box with them.
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
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*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
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post #22 of 26
I use those moving boxes. Search for Kara Buntin on out tube she has a pretty good video. I've now delivered 15 tiered cakes her way and it's great
post #23 of 26
Found the Kara Buntin video. That looks like a good solution!
post #24 of 26

I use various sized cardboard shipping boxes.  I can buy them locally very cheap....for instance a 12 x 12 x 12 runs about $0.75 up to an 18 x 18 x 24 runs about $1.50...cheaper than a white paper cake box!  I've even seen these at Wal-Mart for less than a couple dollars!

 

I use a cardboard cutting knife to cut the top of the box off leaving about 3 inches of length for the sides...this becomes the "lid".

 

I trim the remainder of the box to the desired height....if it's a really tall cake I have just taped the top flaps up to extend the height of the box, then cut my lid from a second box.  I fold and tape the bottom flaps securely in place and do the same with the flaps for the lid.

 

I then cut the front side of the box from top to bottom so that the side folds down like a draw bridge.  I place a small piece of non-slip rubber mat in the bottom of the box.

 

When ready to deliver, my cold cake (been in the cooler overnight) goes into the box, the front is raised back up into place and taped securely on both side, then the lid placed on and ready to go. 

 

The heavy cardboard also acts to insulate the cake so that it stays cold and firm during delivery.  Not everyone chills their cakes, and that's fine too...just a matter of personal preference.

post #25 of 26

Here you go ...hope this helps:

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUAt7TfI_H0&list=UULuROcHuxRSyeTWQF5MOEhA&index=1&feature=plcp

Dede Wilson (cake decorator) I dont want people to look at my cakes and say: It's to pretty to eat. I want them to look at them as dessert and want to eat them. .
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Dede Wilson (cake decorator) I dont want people to look at my cakes and say: It's to pretty to eat. I want them to look at them as dessert and want to eat them. .
Reply
post #26 of 26

I think you should go for a wedding cake box, for your tiered cakes. They are 6" deep.
You can get them in a pack of 5 boxes. Also free delivery.

http://www.eurocakeboxes.com/wedding-cake-box-37-p.asp

 

hope this helps you :D

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