Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Tyffany & CO. mini cakes....Wedding...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tyffany & CO. mini cakes....Wedding...

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Need some input on how this cake should be done, or what you think would be the best route. See picture below. The smaller boxes will be 2x2x2 mini cakes made to look like Tiffany & Co. boxes. My main question is should I used rolled fondant or poured fondant (never used). Is poured fondant what is used on petit fours?

I am also wanting some input on how you would price a cake like this? Should I price them like a fondant covered cupcake and add time? I am thinking I will be doing sheet cakes, freezing and slicing to get the smaller cakes. Maybe a better idea is to price out the larger cakes and then add time for cutting and decorating. How much time would you calculate in for 100 serving like this? It is hard for me to accurately calculate time when I have 4 kids running around stopping me every two minutes.
LL
post #2 of 14
Wow. Good luck with this one! Those small cakes are a total pain to do. It looks like rolled fondant to me. They even have the box top look. And all those bows. Figure out your estimated time and double it. We did cakes like this once at the bakery I worked for and it took 3 people working 2 days straight to get them all done. I think she charged like $7 a piece. And that was 4 years ago.

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply
post #3 of 14
Yes this is definitely rolled fondant. I did square petit fours once...3 years ago. I have never done them again. They are A LOT of work and take a long time to do just one. Be prepared for long hours with these. Make sure you have a really firm BC or ganache on those mini cakes so the fondant goes on smoothly and with sharp box edges. I used marzipan under some of mine because they were mini fruit cakes. The ones I did in carrot walnut and chocolate cake I used royal icing...didn't know about BC back in those days. The photo is in my gallery. You will see a 2 tier cake and a tower of mini petit fours. Somehow it was so hard to paste a 2 x 2 x 2 cake with icing vs a 4" H cake. You will need a 2x2 card under each cake to protect the underneath cake from touching any cupcake stand surfaces and making a mess when ppl pick up. The time-consuming part for me was rolling out each piece of fondant, applying, smoothing, smoothing and smoothing. Then repeating this. I think I did over a 100 and had to get my mom to help me. My arms were gone and over-worked. You have double work cuz you have to put on that box lid after you cover the mini cake. Make your bows way ahead of time. I noticed the bows hang over each cake. Maybe cutting these in advance and leaving to dry curved on a dummy cake edge might work. These go for $10 US all the way to $20 US per mini cake here. They are really expensive.
post #4 of 14
<shudder> that cake brings back terrible memories...... I totally second the time these evil little things take!
You should probably go for a production line method and do all of one step at a time, you might find it easier to cut all the sides out and let them dry then attach them later as this will give you sharper edges- but you do run the risk of slight gaps where sides join so keep some matching royal icing handy to fill icon_smile.gif
post #5 of 14
I would use the Silverwood mini cake pans . PERFECT 2 x 2 cakes. It's an investment to buy the pan but it's amazing - sharp and perfect (Picture Below)

Rolled fondant - not poured.

I would make a sample and try one first
A - crumb coat cakes - that's 1/8" thick , so now cake is 2 1/4" square

B - 8.5" x 2"strip of fondant that wraps around sides of cake - 1/8" thick - Now cake is 2 1/2" square

C - narrow (1/8" thick) strip of fondant for box top sides.- Now cake top is 2 3/4"

D - 2 3/4" square fondant for top of box

E - Add bow
LL
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses!! Yes, from what I've been reading after posting, this looks like it would be a total PIA. I was thinking at least $400 for a 6" square and 98 mini's but now I'm thinking it might be much more,lol! I did suggest to the wedding planner that I'm working with that she do cupcakes to look similar or even actual boxes with mini cupcakes or cake balls. I like the latter idea!!
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynne3

Rolled fondant - not poured.

I would make a sample and try one first
A - crumb coat cakes - that's 1/8" thick , so now cake is 2 1/4" square

B - 8.5" x 2"strip of fondant that wraps around sides of cake - 1/8" thick - Now cake is 2 1/2" square

C - narrow (1/8" thick) strip of fondant for box top sides.- Now cake top is 2 3/4"

D - 2 3/4" square fondant for top of box

E - Add bow



This process works even if you cut the cubes from sheets. Buttercream, jam or ganache filling all work fine.

You can stop anywhere in the production line this way.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynne3

I would use the Silverwood mini cake pans . PERFECT 2 x 2 cakes. It's an investment to buy the pan but it's amazing - sharp and perfect (Picture Below)

Rolled fondant - not poured.

I would make a sample and try one first
A - crumb coat cakes - that's 1/8" thick , so now cake is 2 1/4" square

B - 8.5" x 2"strip of fondant that wraps around sides of cake - 1/8" thick - Now cake is 2 1/2" square

C - narrow (1/8" thick) strip of fondant for box top sides.- Now cake top is 2 3/4"

D - 2 3/4" square fondant for top of box

E - Add bow



It is indeed a great investment...
Had mine for 3 years - love using it.
The silicon liners make it so easy for getting those little babies out.
Fruit cakes or mud cakes - its a dream of a pan to use.

Bluehue
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene

This process works even if you cut the cubes from sheets.

But the good thing about a pan like that, is you don't have to cut them. Once you break that outside crust, it makes it a messy complicated job. When they are all baked individually like that tin does, each cake is nice and contained in the "crust" from the pan touching it on all sides.
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture

Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene

This process works even if you cut the cubes from sheets.

But the good thing about a pan like that, is you don't have to cut them. Once you break that outside crust, it makes it a messy complicated job. When they are all baked individually like that tin does, each cake is nice and contained in the "crust" from the pan touching it on all sides.



Very true. The absence of the crust slowed me down with crumb coating each mini cake. All the icing was sticking up and pulling off the cake. Wish I knew this back then.
post #11 of 14

I just bought this type of pan but with 2.5x2.5 cylinder shape and there are 16 in total.

 

What do you mean by silicon liner?  Do I place a silicon piece in each of the 16 rings?  Or do you mean placing silicon under each of the metal rings like on a cookie

 

Thank you,

Stacy

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jena2727 View Post

Thanks for the responses!! Yes, from what I've been reading after posting, this looks like it would be a total PIA. I was thinking at least $400 for a 6" square and 98 mini's but now I'm thinking it might be much more,lol! I did suggest to the wedding planner that I'm working with that she do cupcakes to look similar or even actual boxes with mini cupcakes or cake balls. I like the latter idea!!


So, I would be looking at a little under £850 for 98 of these (which is approx $1345 according to xe.com)  Then the top tier cake would be extra.  They are a LOT of work...  however much time and effort you think they'll take, double it, LOL!  Because the thing with these is if you're doing them, you have to do them WELL, if you know what I mean?

Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overambitious View Post

I just bought this type of pan but with 2.5x2.5 cylinder shape and there are 16 in total.

 

What do you mean by silicon liner?  Did you not get the brown silicon liners  that come with the square or cylinder pans? They are strips of silicon that you can line either type paqn with...makes for easy release when cakes are baked.. for the mini square pans, the silicon liners are a cross shape.... I will shoot off and find a link for you so as you know what i mean...

http://www.blueribbons.co.uk/shop/tins-for-sale/silverwood-cake-pans/

 

 

Click on link - scroll down untill you see 18 Square Cake Pan Liners then keep scfolling down untill you seee the cylinder ones.

Plus you will also see the cutters for both types of mini pans.... the cutters make it easier asnd quicker for cutting out the shape fondant...

 

 

. Do I place a silicon piece in each of the 16 rings?  Or do you mean placing silicon under each of the metal rings like on a cookie

I place a sheet of baking paper on the baking tray under all the mini pans before i fill them....makes for easier lifting of the mini cakes and easier to clean after baking...

 

You can buy the liners and fondant cutters seperate...

Hope this helps.

 

Bluehue

 

Thank you,

Stacy

post #14 of 14

THANK YOU !! I never saw those items before as I bought the pans in the USA.  

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Tyffany & CO. mini cakes....Wedding...