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Making a "friend's" wedding cake - but didn't get - Page 2

post #16 of 34
With her financial situation, is this going to be a huge catered affair? Or something more simple and casual?
post #17 of 34
Throw the ball back in her court. Simply say "I can't wait to see you cut the cake!" And then wait for her reaction. It puts her in the position of actually having to tell you you're not invited...or she will agree and you know you're included. Sorry, but she put you in this awkward position, there's no reason not to make it equally uncomfortable for her!

OR you could just be straightforward and say "I just need to clear something...am I invited to the wedding? If not I need to schedule my delivery time differently."

I know it's not easy, but really, what have you got to lose?

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post #18 of 34
Thread Starter 
It's a small town wedding with reception in the town hall. I just emailed her asking how many people have RSVP'd. Maybe I'll email her about the cake cutting. I'd would be nice to know what to wear (wedding attire or not) and how long I need my babysitter! It's not like I can run home and change.

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post #19 of 34
Don't assume that because she's young that she messed up. I did my daughter's wedding invites and the seating plan.
When a friend was helping set up the reception area, she saw the hairdresser's name on the seating chart, and told me 'you know, she said she wasn't invited'.
This hairdresser was not a close friend of my daughter's, but she was a very friendly acquaintance who boarded her horse at the same stable as my daughter. She also was kind enough to come to the home and do all the bridesmaids' hair as well as my daughter's.
I just assumed I'd sent out the invite to her and hubby.
I immediately went home and apologized profusely in front of everyone there, but she'd already made plans for that evening.
I felt awful.
So this could've been an oversight. Or else because you 'USED to know her well', she isn't feeling close enough to you at this point to have you at her special event.
That being said, it is tacky of her to accept such a huge gift as the cake w/o inviting you.
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Throw the ball back in her court. Simply say "I can't wait to see you cut the cake!" And then wait for her reaction. It puts her in the position of actually having to tell you you're not invited...or she will agree and you know you're included. Sorry, but she put you in this awkward position, there's no reason not to make it equally uncomfortable for her!

OR you could just be straightforward and say "I just need to clear something...am I invited to the wedding? If not I need to schedule my delivery time differently."

I know it's not easy, but really, what have you got to lose?



I just don't think she did put the OP in an awkward position. The OP has not received an invitation, and was therefore not invited. To deliberately make things awkward for her is rude.
post #21 of 34
Something similar happened to me a couple years ago, I made the cake and because I didn't get an invite I assumed I wasn't invited. But turns out she just thought I should know I was invited icon_rolleyes.gif and was sad that I had left. You know what they say about assumptions.
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post #22 of 34
You need to be clear about the bride's expectations. Sometimes we are thrust into awkward situations. Ask if you are invited or if she simply wants the cake.

On a side note, when I owned my bakery I was invited to many, many weddings. If I did not know the people well, I always declined the invitation. Their next move was to say, "But you're still making the cake, aren't you?" Their assumption was that I would gift them with the cake, regardless of whether or not I was attending. Regardless of whether or not I would have been invited if I didn't make cake.

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post #23 of 34
A few years ago I had a coworker ask (beg) me to do her wedding cake. I wasn't very exerienced and not legal so I couldn't sell her a cake. She begged and pleaded until I caved and said I'd do it as a gift.

Well, the invitations went out and I didn't get one. I didn't say anything, just wasn't planning to attend the wedding. I ended up geting a "D-list" invitation in my work mailbox 2 days after the RSVPs were due! icon_eek.gificon_lol.gif . She waited to get regrets and then invited more people! I was there setting up the cake when the wedding planner was laying out the seating cards and she didn't even have the names of the "D-listers"! We were all at one table in the back of the room. Talk about feeling like crap icon_rolleyes.gif.

I've since gifted a few more wedding cakes but I'm careful to whom I make that offer and don't allow myself to be talked into it.
post #24 of 34
I personally would feel funny just asking the bride if I was invited. Puts you both in a weird spot. However, if you really want to know, just say something like "Please send me pictures of the cake cutting, I would love to see them!" or something along those lines. That way, no one's being put on the spot. If she planned on inviting you, this would be her chance to.
post #25 of 34
I don't know. If I am about to spend the good part of a week, and over $100 in ingredients making a cake for over 200 guests for a 'good friend's wedding, I would have no problem enquiring about whether or not I was invited.

Either way you are going to find out what kind of friend you have there.

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post #26 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir

I don't know. If I am about to spend the good part of a week, and over $100 in ingredients making a cake for over 200 guests for a 'good friend's wedding, I would have no problem enquiring about whether or not I was invited.

Either way you are going to find out what kind of friend you have there.



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post #27 of 34
Call her about the cake...and then ask her another question about the dress or flowers or something just to get her talking about it. Brides like to gush. And when she tells you about something she is excited about, say "that sounds beautiful! I wish I could be there to see..." And then her reaction will tell you one way or the other. If she thinks you are invited, she will ask why you can't be there. Otherwise, she will just let it go and keep talking.

I hope it is just an oversight! Such a large and thoughtful gift for someone you believe is deserving should invite you. But if she didn't, go have a nice dinner with just your husband and enjoy not having to do the chicken dance at a wedding!
post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueRose8302

Call her about the cake...and then ask her another question about the dress or flowers or something just to get her talking about it. Brides like to gush. And when she tells you about something she is excited about, say "that sounds beautiful! I wish I could be there to see..." And then her reaction will tell you one way or the other. If she thinks you are invited, she will ask why you can't be there. Otherwise, she will just let it go and keep talking.

I hope it is just an oversight! Such a large and thoughtful gift for someone you believe is deserving should invite you. But if she didn't, go have a nice dinner with just your husband and enjoy not having to do the chicken dance at a wedding!



I really like this suggestion. I would not feel comfortable asking someone directly if I am invited to their wedding or not. Yes she may have overlooked you or just assumed you were invited. But to ask someone and make them feel uncomfortable is not the best thing to do. It puts them on the spot and then they feel like they would have to say yes even if they didn't mean to invite you.
post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jess155

I'm making a wedding cake for a person I used to know well. She works at a non-profit place that I volunteered at for about 3 years (I stopped volunteering a year ago when my husband's schedule changed). She got engaged a year ago while I was still volunteering and she asked me to make her cake. I don't sell my cakes because it's not legal here in MN. She offered to pay for ingredients, but I said no.

We've been emailing back and forth about the design and such. She's told me the times and places for the wedding and reception (it's an hour away) because I needed to know where to bring the cake...... Is it possible she just assumes that I assume I'm invited?? There's going to be 200+ people and it's 4 weeks away. icon_confused.gif

------------------Yeah, it stinks. My husband says 22 year olds are not brilliant, especially when planning a wedding and she is assuming we'll come. He says if we drop off the cake and leave, she'll feel really bad. But I can't assume we're invited. I just think her and I are both going to feel bad about this.

We don't have any close mutual friends, except the people at the non-profit. I wish I could ask them, but it might be weird.

------------------It's a small town wedding with reception in the town hall. I just emailed her asking how many people have RSVP'd. Maybe I'll email her about the cake cutting. I'd would be nice to know what to wear (wedding attire or not) and how long I need my babysitter! It's not like I can run home and change.



I've been following this thread hoping that it all works out, without any hurt feelings on your side. [I've quoted each of your posts above to make sure I didn't lose any of your comments in the body of the thread.] I hope your husband is correct, but it certainly could go either way. You offered with affection and pride to invest the time and $$ needed to do a wedding cake for a former acquaintance/friend. You assumed that since it was made clear that the cake was a gift, free and clear, that you and your husband would be invited.

I would suggest that 4 weeks out from the wedding that the "awkward phase" has passed and you need a distinct answer, potential hurt feelings or not. Since there has been no written invitation on her part, I think your concern: " I just think her and I are both going to feel bad about this." has already happened. I would simply ask if you and your husband have been invited. Not being clear is what is causing the current problem.

If she says, "No", then you may not wish to stay and cut the cake. If you offer to cut the cake before you find out, and THEN learn you are NOT invited, THAT would be "awkward".

4 weeks out is plenty of time to ask. I suggest a combination of BlakesCakes suggestion and my suggestion. The statements are clear, unambiguous and will tell you what you must know.

I would merely telephone (no email)--NOW--and ask a pertinent cake/delivery question, and then say:

"I need to firm up plans for your wedding day. Should I plan on wearing casual clothes to deliver and set-up the cake, or will my husband and I need to have a change of formal wedding attire to change into after the cake delivery. I realized that we're very close to the day and I haven't received an invitation in the mail with an RSVP card. I'm sure that other vendors need final head counts. Are DH & I invited to the ceremony and reception?"

Wait for her answer.

If yes, then tell her 1 or 2 attending and follow up with an e-mail to that effect. If, "No", then simply say, "Thanks. I'll just plan on wearing casual attire for the delivery and set-up at the venue."

(I sincerely hope that your husband is correct. Best wishes, dear lady.)
post #30 of 34
Thread Starter 
Thank you for all your suggestions. They've all been so helpful. Like I said, I wrote her an email about the RSVP count. She usually takes a few days to get back to me, which is normal because I take days to get back to her too. If I haven't heard anything by Monday, maybe I'll give her a call and ask about sending me pictures. I should know by her answer. I just don't want the "pity invitation". Some of your stories were just awful, and I can see how you'd be so upset!

I homeschool because I've seen the village and I don't want it raising my children.

 

http://whynotethiopia2.blogspot.com/

 

 

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I homeschool because I've seen the village and I don't want it raising my children.

 

http://whynotethiopia2.blogspot.com/

 

 

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