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Non-perishable Bavarian Cream recipe?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi all,
I have a cake for this weekend and the client has requested Bavarian Cream filling. In the past, I have purchased it from the bakery at the grocery store and it is non-perishable. However, my New Years resolution this year was to start baking from scratch, so I would really like to find a recipe that I could make from scratch if possible.

The cake will be sitting out for some time, so I would like to find a non-perishable recipe if possible.

Thanks!
post #2 of 12
Please ask the bakery for the label--take home an empty bucket. Some of us can use the list of ingredients to tell you if you might make this from scratch.
post #3 of 12
The amount of time a cake sits out for an event would most likely not be enough to cause any concern. Especially if you deliver the cake cold and let it warm to room temp slowly.

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post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene

Please ask the bakery for the label--take home an empty bucket. Some of us can use the list of ingredients to tell you if you might make this from scratch.



I think it is the same as this stuff:
Pastry Filling-Bavarian Cream
Excellent for pies, pastries, cookies, tortes, and between cake layers. One sleeve pastry filling yields 3 cups. These pastry fillings do not soak into cakes. Refrigerate after opening; stays fresh for 3-6 months. Filled cakes may be frozen or refrigerated.
Ingredients: Water, Sugar, Modified Food Starch. Contains 2% or less of the following; Partially Hydrogenated Soybean and Cottonseed Oils, Salt, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Agar Agar, Titanium Dioxide (color), Sorbic Acid, Yellow 5, Yellow 6, Lactic Acid.

It's that shelf stable pastry cream that they use in pastries and my grocery store sells it repackaged in a little clamshell container.

I was thinking of using the Mock Bettercream recipe and adding vanilla pudding to it? The cake will be filled with raspberry jam (homemade) as well.

Here's the recipe I was going to use:
Mock Whipped Cream Frosting with Pudding Mix

4 tbsp. flour
1 c. milk
1/2 c. margarine
1/2 c. shortening
1 c. sugar
2 tbsp. vanilla
2 tbsp. instant pudding mix (any flavor desired)
1/2 c. chopped nuts

Combine flour and milk in saucepan and cook over LOW HEAT until thick, stirring constantly. Cream the margarine, shortening and sugar together for 4 minutes. (Can use all margarine). Add cooled flour mixture and vanilla; beat an additional 4 minutes. Fold in instant pudding mix and nuts - spread on cooled cake.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

The amount of time a cake sits out for an event would most likely not be enough to cause any concern. Especially if you deliver the cake cold and let it warm to room temp slowly.



I don't usually put fondant covered cakes in the fridge, but I'm thinking I might do that in this case. The cake is being delivered at 1, and the party is at 3, so if I have to go this route, I think it will be fine as well.
I'm going to try out the recipe I posted above, and see how it tastes!
post #6 of 12
This is my recipe and it's absolutely delicious--and so easy
.
8 oz   Cream Cheese, softened
2   Regular-size Boxes Instant Vanilla Pudding Mix,
¾ cup   Cold Milk
12 oz   Whipped Topping, thawed

Directions:

"Cream" the cream cheese until smooth and add milk slowly. Then beat in pudding mixes until completely blended. Fold in the whipped topping. Refrigerate until needed.

I use half and half instead of milk and if I can find it, I'll use the Cool Whip made with real cream.

I usually have some left over and use it in a cake trifle with strawberries and left over cake trimmings for my family. Yum!

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post #7 of 12
Traditional Bavarian cream is a creme anglaise with whipped cream stabilized with gelatin. Most people are used to the stuff in the sleeve. They don't know the difference.

I don't use pudding mixes or artificial whopped topping, so I came up with my own "Bavarian Cream" and it's shelf stable: I make a homemade vanilla pudding (cream anglaise taken to pudding consistency, curdles and all - it would make a trained pastry chef have a heart attach) and use it to flavor SMBC. The ticker it is, the less I have to use for flavor. Then I further boost it with vanilla bean paste. It has all the flavor and a very close texture to Bavarian cream without the worry of being perishable. I use it regularly in my profiterols and when people ask for it as a filling. They LOVE it.

If you want to keep it scratch, give that a try even if you normally use ABC on your cakes.
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Traditional Bavarian cream is a creme anglaise with whipped cream stabilized with gelatin. Most people are used to the stuff in the sleeve. They don't know the difference.

I don't use pudding mixes or artificial whopped topping, so I came up with my own "Bavarian Cream" and it's shelf stable: I make a homemade vanilla pudding (cream anglaise taken to pudding consistency, curdles and all - it would make a trained pastry chef have a heart attach) and use it to flavor SMBC. The ticker it is, the less I have to use for flavor. Then I further boost it with vanilla bean paste. It has all the flavor and a very close texture to Bavarian cream without the worry of being perishable. I use it regularly in my profiterols and when people ask for it as a filling. They LOVE it.

If you want to keep it scratch, give that a try even if you normally use ABC on your cakes.



This is wonderful! Thank you so much! I use IMBC (but I imagine it would work just as well as SMBC in this case?) so I just need to try out the homemade pudding. I would much prefer this to using instant pudding!

Everyone is just so darn helpful! Thank you!
post #9 of 12
IMBC would work just the same. I should specify - "pudding" is milk thickened with corn starch, creme anglaise is a traditional egg yolk/heavy cream custard. I do not use corn starch recipes for this because it can leave a grit in the MBC. I use this recipe only I use a split vanilla bean instead of extract:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/creme-anglaise-i/

I cook it like I'm making lemon curd and take it way past sauce stage. I cook it on medium-low heat and stir stir stir. When it heavily coats the back of a spoon or starts to curdle I pull it and strain it. Once cooled it should be super thick. And really yummy as it, I might add.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Quote:

I think it is the same as this stuff:

Pastry Filling-Bavarian Cream

Excellent for pies, pastries, cookies, tortes, and between cake layers. One sleeve pastry filling yields 3 cups. These pastry fillings do not soak into cakes. Refrigerate after opening; stays fresh for 3-6 months. Filled cakes may be frozen or refrigerated.

Ingredients: Water, Sugar, Modified Food Starch. Contains 2% or less of the following; Partially Hydrogenated Soybean and Cottonseed Oils, Salt, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Agar Agar, Titanium Dioxide (color), Sorbic Acid, Yellow 5, Yellow 6, Lactic Acid.

It's that shelf stable "pastry" cream that they use in pastries and my grocery store sells it repackaged in a little clamshell container. .



Sure. It's "shelf stable" in the original sterile packed sleeve.

There are no milk products. So any recipe containing milk products is NOT the same especially in terms of "shelf stability".

And excuse me for pointing out the obvious--it does say "refrigerate after opening". That warning should be transferred to those little clamshells. This pastry filling will remain fresh ONLY when refrigerated after opening the sleeve.

I have attached a professional chef's recipe for ganache truffles, that confirms what I was trained. That is that ALL products containing any form of milk MUST be refrigerated at all times unless they are sealed in sterile cans/tetrapaks.

http://www.thestar.com/living/food/recipes/article/947283--chef-s-showcase-earl-grey-chocolate-truffles
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
^The stuff they use at the bakery might be slightly different then, because they keep it in a tub under the counter, don't refridgerate the cakes they fill with it and they put the clamshells on the shelf.

FromScratch: Just so I can understand the science behind it a bit better, what makes the creme anglais shelf stable? Is it because the milk is cooked to a certain temp?
From what I understand of the Cottage Food laws, a food isn't considered perishable because it contains dairy, but it has to do with water content and Ph?

Thank you all for you help!
post #12 of 12
I can only speak for my local HD, but SMBC/IMBC is shelf stable. Flavorings by themselves may be perishable but when added to SMBC/IMBC the sugar content of the buttercream prevent bacteria growth - making them shelf stable. I really overcook the heck out of it to concentrate as much flavor as possible, then I use less then 1 cup of it to 5 cups buttercream. It's to taste, really. I like to add enough that it changes the color and adds a little bit of a more creamy texture, then add more VBP if I think it needs a little more boost of vanilla. But I generally don't need to do it since I split, scrape and cook the husk of a vanilla bean with the creme anglaise. It gets very vanilla-y.

You may want to check with your local HD about it though.
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