Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating Business › Was this a process foul?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Was this a process foul? - Page 4

post #46 of 57
Oh I have nothing to add to this other than a very immature ROFLMAO. That's ok, cause this is awesome.
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
post #47 of 57
Now children cant we all just play nice ... take a chill pill already ... Jason I look forward to your posts as they are always very informative and I certainly dont find them judgemental ... and Rae you too are very knowledgable .I have learned so much from all of the talented people here and am so very grateful. The one thing I could never understand about the forums here on CC is that some of seem to get so touchy about certain circumstances when all any of want to do is learn and share ... As for the OP I don't see how anyone could possibly dictate what her gift to the couple should be .
Be Kind Anyway
Reply
Be Kind Anyway
Reply
post #48 of 57
All I can say is if I had a baker that was so hoity-toity as to dictate what cakes could be provided at MY wedding, unless their name was Ron Ben Israel, I would tell that baker to take a flying leap into a big batch of buttercream!

I swear I've never heard such BS in my life. And yes you can jump down my throat and start screaming 'liabilities' and legalities and all the usual crap, but the bottom line is you're providing a cake, not the Mona Lisa.

I worked for a bakery that sometimes did groom's cakes when another baker did the wedding cake and vice versa. No one got their nose out of joint. I did a grooms cake for a bride who decided at the last minute she wanted one. And yes...'gasp!' I used the school logo without getting written permission from the grand poo-bah of copyright law. And I would do it again. That's me...rebel without a clause! (and by the way, I was told later that everyone liked my cake better!)

OP...you did nothing wrong. You provided a lovely gift. And the rest of you provided me a good laugh!

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply

If I am ever on life support, unplug me...

Then plug me back in.  See if that works!

Reply
post #49 of 57
The OP was not at fault because she was not told of the situation.

I agree that the fault lies with the bride because she shouldn't have had another cake from two different people if this piece of contract with in place.

Maybe the bride was unaware of this part of the contract she signed with the baker and wanted a grooms cake but couldn't afford it, so she asked her cousin who could do it for free.

I can understand this lengthy discussion from both points of view, from a brides point of view, "If I want two cakes from two different people that's up to me" but I can also see it from a bakers point of view "If there's a problem with one cake and guests get sick, how will they know it wasn't my cake??" etc etc.
My cakes are never level. . . . .its because my damn cooker is wonky!!
Reply
My cakes are never level. . . . .its because my damn cooker is wonky!!
Reply
post #50 of 57
How do they know it wasn't meat, fish, rotten veggies icon_smile.gif or other stuff at the reception?
Paula
Reply
Paula
Reply
post #51 of 57
This is why I don't do random groom's cakes http://www.acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2010/02/why-i-dont-do-random-grooms-cakes.html

The OP wasn't wrong to provide a cake. IF there was a sole-provider clause, and nobody knows whether that was the case, it's the bride's problem.

I'm surprised at Jason too, though. I can see your perspective, but the bride wasn't forced to book with someone who had a sole-provider clause, so that's her problem. If you know about it you shouldn't encourage her to violate that, because the wedding cake baker might be the person who WOULD walk away with the cake if they saw another cake there! It's like the people who move into a neighborhood with a neighborhood association then complain about the rules they have. Nobody forces you to move in and sign the agreement, so don't complain when you're expected to abide by the details of what you signed.

I had one groom who kept emailing me about making him a groom's cake when I wasn't doing the wedding cake. I told him I'd do it at the rehearsal but not the reception, and told him the reasons. He agreed, then after three or four emails he let slip "We have no intention of serving it at the rehearsal, we're going to take it to the reception." Okay, dumbass, then I'm not doing the cake. He got all offended when I told him that I wouldn't do it. Too bad, don't try to put one over on me then tell me about it, genius, I don't play that.
post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

All I can say is if I had a baker that was so hoity-toity as to dictate what cakes could be provided at MY wedding, unless their name was Ron Ben Israel, I would tell that baker to take a flying leap into a big batch of buttercream!

I swear I've never heard such BS in my life. And yes you can jump down my throat and start screaming 'liabilities' and legalities and all the usual crap, but the bottom line is you're providing a cake, not the Mona Lisa.

I worked for a bakery that sometimes did groom's cakes when another baker did the wedding cake and vice versa. No one got their nose out of joint. I did a grooms cake for a bride who decided at the last minute she wanted one. And yes...'gasp!' I used the school logo without getting written permission from the grand poo-bah of copyright law. And I would do it again. That's me...rebel without a clause! (and by the way, I was told later that everyone liked my cake better!)

OP...you did nothing wrong. You provided a lovely gift. And the rest of you provided me a good laugh!



What she saidicon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif
Live, Laugh, Love,
and
Scrap it all!
Reply
Live, Laugh, Love,
and
Scrap it all!
Reply
post #53 of 57
The bride in the situation I posted was an adult and able to make her own decisions. When people post here asking about copyright and legal issues, I don't lecture them on ethics or tell them what they absolutely must or must not do, I give them the relevant facts, laws, and risks, then let them make up their own mind. Same deal with this customer, my job was to provide a cake, not be the contract law police.

Before the bride found us, the groom's sister was planning on bringing a gluten-free/nut-free cake anyway so her kid could actually eat dessert at the reception, so the sole source clause would have been violated regardless of whether or not we provided a cake.

IMO the greater good was served by providing a cake the groom's niece could eat. It's fine if your opinion differs, but like I said before ethics is a deeply personal and subjective topic, so trying to impose your own ethics on other adults is an exercise is futility.
post #54 of 57
IMO, Jason, I think they've got you by the short hairs. The groom's sister bringing a gluten free/nut free cake for her daughter is just a tad bit different than providing a groom's cake for the guests.

We all greatly appreciate your vast knowledge and expertise and your willingness to share without condescension, but this has allowed us to see a different side of you. You're not going to convince anyone now that you're not human like the rest of us.

thumbs_up.gif
post #55 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgifford

IMO, Jason, I think they've got you by the short hairs. The groom's sister bringing a gluten free/nut free cake for her daughter is just a tad bit different than providing a groom's cake for the guests.


To clarify, the impression the bride gave me was that the groom's sister would make a regular size cake (probably a quarter sheet) which would be served at the venue alongside the regular cake, not just an individual cake.

From the perspective of a sole source baker I don't think a homemade cake served at the reception would be preferable to a cake brought by a licensed and inspected bakery.
post #56 of 57
Ok, Jason. icon_wink.gif

To me, it's all academic anyway. Until I read it here, I had never heard of a sole provider clause. I could be wrong, but I don't believe that's common practice in my part of the world.
post #57 of 57
first let me start by saying....LOL

ok, now that that's done, I do have an exclusivity clause in my contract. The number 1 reason being, I don't want my customer buying some dry frozen grocery store sheet cake to supplement a smaller cake that I have provided. When people ask them, "Who made the cake?", they're going to refer to my business, not Giantmart USA. So if the guests eat the megastore cake and it is horrible, guess what, I just lost a potential customer. I do, on the flip side, provide kitchen cakes for cutting at a discount, so I am happy to work with them if it is a matter of budget. Also, if they have cake needs that I am not able to fulfill (i.e. allergies etc), they are welcome to "walk" and find another baker who is able to accommodate their needs, I don't have a gun to their head forcing them to sign my contract.

That being said, it was not the OP's job to seek out permission from the other bakery, that was the bride's responsibility. But I can put myself in the other baker's shoes and see why they may have been taken aback had their been a legal contract in place.
You get more bees with honey!
Reply
You get more bees with honey!
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating Business
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating Business › Was this a process foul?