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Practice with Dummy Cakes

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I am a newbie, so here's my question. I would like to practice working with fondant. I really don't want to keep making cake's just to practice with fondant.
Will it be ok if I just buy cake dummies, practice on them and take pictures of my work.

Can I please get some advice.

Thanks in advance!!!!
post #2 of 14
I see no issue with this. Many cake artists work with dummy cakes. If you cover the dummies in plastic wrap, you can put fondant on them, but also re-use them if you chose.
post #3 of 14
Styrofoam dummies are washable. I'd slather them with shortening before applying fondant.
post #4 of 14
I have done quite a few practice cakes using cake dummies. I get an idea or see a technique I would like to try....pull out the cake dummies..decorate and then takes pictures. When I post one on here I just list it as a practice cake using cake dummies. I got mine from dallasfoam and I love them....
post #5 of 14
A quick piggy back since I've never used dummies before: For fondant do you crumb-coat the dummy with BC as you would a real cake and then cover with fondant? If not, how do you attach the fondant to a cling-wrapped dummy? Thanks.
post #6 of 14
A quick piggy back since I've never used dummies before: For fondant do you crumb-coat the dummy with BC as you would a real cake and then cover with fondant? If not, how do you attach the fondant to a cling-wrapped dummy? Thanks.
post #7 of 14
I have never used the cling wrap method before..I use a layer of piping gel then fondant or a layer of shortening then fondant....then when I am done I usually run a sink of hot water and toss the dummies in...soak one side for a while then flip...the fondant should peel off, if not you can gently use a plastic scraper. I know that some people use the dishwasher to clean theirs.
post #8 of 14
Decorate a dummy exactly as you would a real cake. Use a layer of bc under the fondant. After it dries well, you can run a butter knife between the dummy and the fondant and the fondant will pop off. Then wash with really hot soapy water, let it dry and start again.
post #9 of 14
LaWmn223 and jgifford, thank you for your responses. I had no IDEA the dummies could withstand washing. How cool!
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you for all the replies. I' m going to get started tomorrow.
post #11 of 14
Thank you for this thread. I have just finished my third Wilton class and would love to practice more. I am on a diet( have actually lost 40 lbs since starting classes) and my family is pretty tired of cakes right now. This is going to be a great help icon_smile.gif

Sheila
New to cake decorating, just here to learn.
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New to cake decorating, just here to learn.
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post #12 of 14
Perfect timing for me too! I have just received my some supplies I ordered, including a "dummy". I was hoping it could be reused endlessly! I have only ever decorated 2 cakes in my life so I need a lot of practice and I am looking forward to every minute!
Someone should have warned me that cake decorating is addictive! LOL icon_razz.gif
Just getting started....and totally addicted!
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Just getting started....and totally addicted!
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post #13 of 14
This might help you if you have never used a cake dummy....after you have covered it with fondant you now need to decorate it without it moving. I use a couple of different methods. I place the dummy on a piece of non-skid shelf liner or I have a foamboard round/plastic wrapped cardboard round...that I have placed about three Removable Glue Dots in a triangle pattern that will fit under the cake dummy...place the cake dummy on the round over the dots and press down...When you have finished your project just use a spatula/cake lifter under the dummy to help break the glue bond then just peel off the dots and throw them away and wash your dummy. I used to use the nail method were you take a thick piece of foamboard and cut a large round..then you take a three/four inch nail, large washer and glue...find the center of your board and mark it...use the head of the nail to poke a hole through the board...then pull the nail out...place washer on the nail, add some glue between them so that when the glue dries it is more stable then put some glue over the hole so that it will spread when you push the nail/washer all the way through. Let dry..then just place the dummy on the nail. I did use this for a while but it began to break down the styrofoam dummy after placing and removing it over and over.
Hope this helps you...because take my word for it, there is nothing like the feeling of watching your cake dummy that you have been working on fly off your turntable and land on the floor five feet away...it is at that moment you say icon_mad.giftapedshut.gificon_cry.gif
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaWmn223

This might help you if you have never used a cake dummy....after you have covered it with fondant you now need to decorate it without it moving. I use a couple of different methods. I place the dummy on a piece of non-skid shelf liner or I have a foamboard round/plastic wrapped cardboard round...that I have placed about three Removable Glue Dots in a triangle pattern that will fit under the cake dummy...place the cake dummy on the round over the dots and press down...When you have finished your project just use a spatula/cake lifter under the dummy to help break the glue bond then just peel off the dots and throw them away and wash your dummy. I used to use the nail method were you take a thick piece of foamboard and cut a large round..then you take a three/four inch nail, large washer and glue...find the center of your board and mark it...use the head of the nail to poke a hole through the board...then pull the nail out...place washer on the nail, add some glue between them so that when the glue dries it is more stable then put some glue over the hole so that it will spread when you push the nail/washer all the way through. Let dry..then just place the dummy on the nail. I did use this for a while but it began to break down the styrofoam dummy after placing and removing it over and over.
Hope this helps you...because take my word for it, there is nothing like the feeling of watching your cake dummy that you have been working on fly off your turntable and land on the floor five feet away...it is at that moment you say icon_mad.giftapedshut.gificon_cry.gif



Totally great advice! thumbs_up.gif
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