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modeling chocolate

post #1 of 50
Thread Starter 
im going to be trying modeling chocolate, as with many other things in cake decorating, im guessing it comes with a lot of trial and error, any pointers for me, good ratio of chocolate to corn syrup? storage, type of chocolate etc. thanks
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post #2 of 50
I just took a modeling chocolate class at wilton in chicago not too long ago.

use a 2:1 ratio of chocolate to corn syrup.

melt the chocolate then stir in glucose.

personally i really found the wilton gucose to make the best modeling chocolate. i also use the wilton candy melts. dont freeze it at all or refrigerate it for too long, instructor was strict about this.

i find this to be easiest too because one container of glucose with two 12oz bags of wilton candy melts makes a batch. ( my local hobby store carries 12 oz and 14oz bags in the same bins for the same price and were clueless when i asked about the size difference and price, but anyways. point is. double check the bag size!!!!!)

ummm.... use corn starch to keep it from sticking if it seems too sticky, not powdered sugar. the instructor was very strict about this.

make it the night before planned use. it needs time to set up good. i highly suggest this. you can refrigerate it for a couple hours if you didnt plan ahead, but dont leave it in there too long.

if it starts getting soft while youre working with it set it down! if it starts getting oily on your hands then you are over working it and it will be ruined and not usable!

if youre making flowers, its best to work assembly line style. this way you wont over work the modeling chocolate. it forces you from getting it too warm from body heat, which will keep you from ruining it!

feel free to ask if you have any questions. i could upload the notes and instruction packet from the class!
post #3 of 50
Thread Starter 
wow, that was phenomenal information. i havent heard of putting glucose in...... i make 3-5 cakes a week, and i wont be useing modeling chocolate on all of them, so i dont think i would make that large of a batch. how does it store? could i make it and store it, and use it within the next couple weeks? if i were to use one bag of melts, how much glucose and corn syrup would i use? (do i just half the amount of chocolate to find out how much corn syrup? Do i use light corn syrup? do you use a double boiler, or microwave? if i were tinting the chocolte it must be done inthe melting phase correct? thank you so much for your information! this is great!
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You Imagine It... I Create It... It's a PEACE of cake!
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post #4 of 50
so glad I read this- I planned on experimenting with modeling chocolate for the first time this weekend to make chocolate roses.....def interested in how you store this, as well as mixing instructions...do you mix it and let it sit on the counter overnight?
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I've learned so much from my mistakes..... I'm thinking of making a few more!
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post #5 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkurek

I just took a modeling chocolate class at wilton in chicago not too long ago.

use a 2:1 ratio of chocolate to corn syrup.



Wow, that is a LOT of corn syrup. So for 1 lb of candy melts you'd use 8 oz. corn syrup? I only use 5.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kkurek

melt the chocolate then stir in glucose.

personally i really found the wilton gucose to make the best modeling chocolate. i also use the wilton candy melts.

I use Merkins or Guittard A'peels candy coating. The flavor is a bazillion times better. I think Wilton leaves a waxy flavor in your mouth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kkurek

dont freeze it at all or refrigerate it for too long, instructor was strict about this.

i find this to be easiest too because one container of glucose with two 12oz bags of wilton candy melts makes a batch. ( my local hobby store carries 12 oz and 14oz bags in the same bins for the same price and were clueless when i asked about the size difference and price, but anyways. point is. double check the bag size!!!!!)



I don't use glucose, with all that corn syrup I don't know how you get your stuff to stay together! I use 1/2 tsp. of glycerin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kkurek

ummm.... use corn starch to keep it from sticking if it seems too sticky, not powdered sugar. the instructor was very strict about this.



I use neither, I roll with a pasta roller and smooth between parchment paper.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kkurek

make it the night before planned use. it needs time to set up good. i highly suggest this. you can refrigerate it for a couple hours if you didnt plan ahead, but dont leave it in there too long.

if it starts getting soft while youre working with it set it down! if it starts getting oily on your hands then you are over working it and it will be ruined and not usable!

if youre making flowers, its best to work assembly line style. this way you wont over work the modeling chocolate. it forces you from getting it too warm from body heat, which will keep you from ruining it!

feel free to ask if you have any questions. i could upload the notes and instruction packet from the class!



Interesting the different ways people do stuff!

I also use the recipe for modeling using real chocolate from Joy of Baking.
post #6 of 50
I use the modeling chocolate recipe here on CC
Candy Clay for Modeling & 3D Figures
Ingredients
14 oz. Package of Candy / Chocolate Melts
1/3 cup light corn syrup

Be sure and weigh your chocolate. I have used guiredille, merckens and wilton. Wilton is the most tempramental for me but I think it is because you can get "old" choc from the store.

Do NOT over mix when you stir in the corn syrup. And be sure you let it rest (covered) for several hours or over night.

I freeze my left over modeling chocolate all the time. I love modelign chocolate and use it in molds as well as my tappits so I save the left over bits to keep a variety of colors.

FYI, I use Wilton a lot it's because I like all the color variety available just up the street.
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Visit me at www.keeponcaking.com for tutorials and other cake stuff.
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post #7 of 50
SNAZZYCAKES1:

Store any unused modeling chocolate it in an airtight container. Stays good for a long time. My instructor says that modeled stuff can stay good for up to and possibly over a year if store in airtight container. I have some from two weeks ago that is still good for modeling.

The problem with saying one bag of melts is that wilton distributes 12 and 14 oz bags. so if youre going to use 12 oz of melts, you would use 6 oz of glucose, which is corn syrup. If you are going to use 14 oz of melts, you would use 7 oz of glucose.

I used normal corn syrup and the chocolate did not want to hold its shape. So the second time I made it after the class I used wiltons glucose and it worked perfectly. And its a ll pre-measured in the container so i knew I had the right amount.

I use a double boiler to melt the chocolate until smooth. Then I let it sit a minute or two then start folding in the glucose (or corn syrup). Dont mix it, fold it. If it starts to get sort of a shiny oily look then you are over doing it. Let it sit and get a sort of matte finish to it. Once combined, wrap the modeling chocolate up in plastic wrap and let it sit over night.

Then, when ready to use, cut off a portion and start kneading it until it is plyable.

Just remember that if it starts getting oily looking youre over working it. Just set it down and let it rest for like 5 minutes or so. If you over work it the oils will separate from the chocolate and it will be ruined.

When mixing in color, just knead it into the modeling chocolate. It is NOT done during the melting phase.

Cut off some modeling chocolate, it will be kinda hard at first, and knead it until soft. Then take a tooth pick and place some color on the chocolate and knead it in. Add more to get desired color.

DEBBYE27:

I answered all of your questions above too. But, basically mix it then wrap it in plastic wrap and let it sit on the counter over night. I also stick my in a gallon ziploc bag just for extra precautions.


ALSO,

You can use water to attach some modeled parts together. We used water to attach calla lily stamens, minor things can be fused together using water. But for other things, such as attaching star gazer lily petals together we used melted candy melts as a glue.

You can see in my pictures the candy melt we used as glue, we were out of class time so everyone was rushing to assemble the pieces, in reality I would make sure you cant see it. But anyways, for the orchid center we used water to keep that in place.
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post #8 of 50
geez. i dont know what happened with the pictures! they posted numerous times!

sorry icon_sad.gif
post #9 of 50
FROMSCRATCH:

So you dont use any glucose or corn syrup in your modeling chocolate recipe?
post #10 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkurek

FROMSCRATCH:

So you dont use any glucose or corn syrup in your modeling chocolate recipe?



I use corn syrup, just not that much. I use glycerin, not glucose. My recipe is from Baking Arts here in SF. I can't post it, it's not mine.
post #11 of 50
I would agree it is too much corn syrup maybe, in the class we used wiltons glucose. Corn syrup seems to be thinner so it wouldn't hold up as good when I tried at home. I think it's sort of a trial and error thing when it comes to using the products you like. They all behave differently.
post #12 of 50
Kkurek, your flowers are gorgeous. I love to make flowers from modeling chocolate. There is a lady at ices convention(mari senago) she is my inspriation. I take her deoms anytime she offers them.
post #13 of 50
kkurek~~Welcome to the CakeCentral forum! Your information is fabulous, thanks so much for taking the time to post the detailed explanations. Your class flowers are so wonderful that I didn't mind that the system posted each one of them several times; I smiled with each photo. I will send you a PM with my regular email address. I would be thrilled to receive the notes and instruction packet from the class.

I am retired and started hobby baking 2 years ago after taking my initial Wilton class at Michaels. Since then this has become a passion and I've attended many, many demos and courses. There is SO much to learn. I find that my personal preference is leaning toward chocolate. Although I've been working with Guittard A'Peels and different candy melts in molded and dipped chocolates, I haven't tried chocolate plastic yet.

kkurek and other posters: I've never tasted chocolate plastic, but I've heard it tastes like tootsie roll. Are the flowers like those in the photos not only edible, but TASTY? Would an adult or child want to eat one and ask for another? It seems such a waste to create gorgeous gum paste or fondant decorations for show only, not for eating. I want my decorations to taste as good as they look.
post #14 of 50
These I made years ago... everything on it is 100% modeling chocolate..

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post #15 of 50
if you don't care about flavor (e.g. no one will be eating your 3d figures or flowers), just use the white candy coating (aka almond bark) from the grocery store (can usually get <$3/lb). i use 1 lb of coating with 1/3 cup of corn syrup.
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