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How to make crisp edges using fondant?? - Page 2

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir

OP - there is no 'correct' method to ice a cake. If you asked 100 members here how they do it, you'd get 100 different answers.

OP, while I'm sure you would get a hundred answers, a whole bunch of them would be less than helpful.

I watched the upside down method video posted above and I would have been finished icing the whole cake by the time she got out her level. There are a lot of non professionals who come up with creative ways to achieve an end goal. But why spend double and triple the time doing it the hard way?

All that's needed for sharp edges is thin enough fondant and refrigerating the cake.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet

Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet

There is no need to spend that much time icing a cake. If you learn alternate methods, you'll never master the correct method.



lol.... there are no cake laws which state the 'correct' methods. As long as the result pleases you, then any method that suits you is the correct one.

lol... as long as the result pleases you? But it can take about 5 minutes or 30 minutes. I was just thinking most people would want to get it over with. I can't fathom taking the extra time to turn the cake upside down, bother with a hot knife or make templates(???) for icing a cake.



I wasn't saying your method isn't fast for you, obviously it is. Your method is the first one I used when I was starting out, and it's fine. I still do it if I'm not worried about perfect edges.

I was just amused that you felt it was the only valid method, that all others were a waste of time. Each method brings it's own pro's and con's. Using the upside down method (not sure what you mean about templates, unless you mean Sharon Zambito's method?) is actually faster for me. You smear icing on top, so do I. Then I flip upside down (takes make 30 seconds max). You smear icing on the side, so do I. It's really not a huge difference in time actually applying the icing. the time saving comes in getting it looking neat and even. You can do it quick as a wink without even thinking when the cake is upside down with cake boards to guide you.

Neatness isn't important all the time, so in those cases you can skip the steps you want to, and only do the bits that suit you.

Just keep an open mind icon_wink.gif

Are you saying Buddy Valastro's cake in the video I posted above wasn't neat and even?

If you can get a cake iced that way in about 3-5 minutes, then I take back what I said, but what I saw in that video was that it took her 3 minutes to tape down the wax paper and spread the icing.on.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet

Are you saying Buddy Valastro's cake in the video I posted above wasn't neat and even?




No, not at all. That man has done probably thousands of cakes that way, he's very practiced and it looked fantastic. I believe I acknowledged it was a good method. I was actually trying to address the way you have disparaged others opinions, including my own.
post #19 of 23
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir

OP - there is no 'correct' method to ice a cake. If you asked 100 members here how they do it, you'd get 100 different answers.

OP, while I'm sure you would get a hundred answers, a whole bunch of them would be less than helpful.

I watched the upside down method video posted above and I would have been finished icing the whole cake by the time she got out her level. There are a lot of non professionals who come up with creative ways to achieve an end goal. But why spend double and triple the time doing it the hard way?

All that's needed for sharp edges is thin enough fondant and refrigerating the cake.



I find an upside down method, slightly different to the one in the video, to be a very helpful method.

It's great you can ice a cake using Buddy's method so quickly. I can't. I can't get it looking even vaguely smooth, no matter how long I spend, so for me, the upside down method is much quicker. Plus, I manage to get my cakes much more level using this method, which is important when I'm stacking. That's why I spend time doing it the 'hard way'.

I can't refrigerate my cakes, due to mostly using ganache and fondant, and high humidity, so your method, using refrigeration, wouldn't work for me at all.

Although, I'm not a professional, so feel free to disregard my opinion. Ask all the professionals here how they smooth their icing. Maybe not a hundred different ways, but I think you'll find that there is no consensus on the 'correct' way.
post #21 of 23
Has anyone used this product? It is now available in North America for $15. I'm just not sure if it's worth it. http://www.edgers.co.uk/new_html/sharp_top_edger_new.html
post #22 of 23
I sincerely hate to disagree with my Aussie pals (or anyone else over this), but there is a "correct" way to ice a cake. It's taught in every pastry school and practiced in every professional bakery anywhere. It's how Buddy demonstrates with buttercream and how Michelle gets ganache on her cake in her ganaching video. It takes practice and tools that not everyone has (turntables, angled spatulas etc).

That doesn't mean other ways of icing a cake is the "wrong" way, but it is not the classically taught, textbook way of icing a cake. So if the only way you can get icing on your cake or you don't have 100 cakes to practice on so you need to turn it upside down or whatever, then more power to you!

No need to feel disparaged if you don't ice your cakes "correctly", I can't make a textbook rose with 1-3-5-7 petals on a flower nail. I am happy to get any buttercream to resemble a rose and I have to pipe it on a stick. If someone pointed out that it was not a "correct" buttercream rose I would 100% agree - it's not. But it looks like a rose and that's good enough for me icon_biggrin.gif

Now, I say this as someone that is a big looser and can't work AT ALL with American crusting buttercream. I tried, it was a disaster and couldn't get it smooth either. Was damn funny how frustrated I got (you know, hindsight, because at the time I was ready to chuck the whole cake). I can only work with meringue buttercream and I think it's easy to smooth, level and get crisp corners!
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

I sincerely hate to disagree with my Aussie pals (or anyone else over this), but there is a "correct" way to ice a cake. It's taught in every pastry school and practiced in every professional bakery anywhere. It's how Buddy demonstrates with buttercream and how Michelle gets ganache on her cake in her ganaching video. It takes practice and tools that not everyone has (turntables, angled spatulas etc).

That doesn't mean other ways of icing a cake is the "wrong" way, but it is not the classically taught, textbook way of icing a cake. So if the only way you can get icing on your cake or you don't have 100 cakes to practice on so you need to turn it upside down or whatever, then more power to you!

No need to feel disparaged if you don't ice your cakes "correctly", I can't make a textbook rose with 1-3-5-7 petals on a flower nail. I am happy to get any buttercream to resemble a rose and I have to pipe it on a stick. If someone pointed out that it was not a "correct" buttercream rose I would 100% agree - it's not. But it looks like a rose and that's good enough for me icon_biggrin.gif

Now, I say this as someone that is a big looser and can't work AT ALL with American crusting buttercream. I tried, it was a disaster and couldn't get it smooth either. Was damn funny how frustrated I got (you know, hindsight, because at the time I was ready to chuck the whole cake). I can only work with meringue buttercream and I think it's easy to smooth, level and get crisp corners!



I'm not trying to be disagreeable either icon_biggrin.gif but I find it interesting that you put quotes around every use of the words, 'correct', 'correctly' and 'wrong'. Kind of implies that you know there's no official correct way to do it.

And as a buttercream rose done the 'wrong' way looks good enough to you, so does this method of icing a cake look good to me - regardless of what is taught where.
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