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Cake squares/ Petit fours question

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Ok so I have had a customer ask for some cake squares and petit fours for a party. I have never done petit fours to sell, so I am looking for advise on pricing for them. And as far as cake squares, I am confused on exactly what they are....is it just a regular sheet cake cut into squares? And if so, do you ice them before or after you cut the squares? And do you put them individual baking cups to serve like you do petit fours?
Any advise and tips will be greatly appreciated!!
post #2 of 32
Google is your friend:
http://www.mahalo.com/how-to-make-petit-fours/
post #3 of 32
I am totally waiting for Leah to respond. I think she charges like $7 a piece to discourage people from buying them since they are a PITA to make. I watched that video a while back. You have to make sure you cut them evenly and that your icing/poured fondant is the right consistency.

Annie
post #4 of 32
Oh yeah, $6 each. No one buys them! In fact there's no one in my city of 1 million people who will make these things. hahaha There's a reason why.

Cake squares? Sheet cake cut into squares and plopped into paper cups I guess. BTW, one bakery in town actually sells those as petit fours. And they know better, as they as associated with one of the local culinary schools. In fairness, that happened a few years ago.

So if you want the order, charge A LOT. And I predict you won't take a second order.

To properly make them, you'll make a sheet, torte it, roll of layer of marzipan on top then cut into bite sized pieces (by definition they are 1 or 2 bites) and cover with poured fondant, then decorate.
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
post #5 of 32
Oh yeah, $6 each. No one buys them! In fact there's no one in my city of 1 million people who will make these things. hahaha There's a reason why.

Cake squares? Sheet cake cut into squares and plopped into paper cups I guess. BTW, one bakery in town actually sells those as petit fours. And they know better, as they as associated with one of the local culinary schools. In fairness, that happened a few years ago.

So if you want the order, charge A LOT. And I predict you won't take a second order.

To properly make them, you'll make a sheet, torte it, roll of layer of marzipan on top then cut into bite sized pieces (by definition they are 1 or 2 bites) and cover with poured fondant, then decorate.
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
post #6 of 32
Oh yeah, $6 each. No one buys them! In fact there's no one in my city of 1 million people who will make these things. hahaha There's a reason why.

Cake squares? Sheet cake cut into squares and plopped into paper cups I guess. BTW, one bakery in town actually sells those as petit fours. And they know better, as they as associated with one of the local culinary schools. In fairness, that happened a few years ago.

So if you want the order, charge A LOT. And I predict you won't take a second order.

To properly make them, you'll make a sheet, torte it, roll of layer of marzipan on top then cut into bite sized pieces (by definition they are 1 or 2 bites) and cover with poured fondant, then decorate.
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
post #7 of 32
Oh yeah, $6 each. No one buys them! In fact there's no one in my city of 1 million people who will make these things. hahaha There's a reason why.

Cake squares? Sheet cake cut into squares and plopped into paper cups I guess. BTW, one bakery in town actually sells those as petit fours. And they know better, as they as associated with one of the local culinary schools. In fairness, that happened a few years ago.

So if you want the order, charge A LOT. And I predict you won't take a second order.

To properly make them, you'll make a sheet, torte it, roll of layer of marzipan on top then cut into bite sized pieces (by definition they are 1 or 2 bites) and cover with poured fondant, then decorate.
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
post #8 of 32
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much! I knew they would be a pain!
Any advise on using marzipan? I have never used it before.
I was just hoping there was a super easy method that I didnt know about! icon_smile.gif wishful thinkn!
post #9 of 32
Marzipan is very easy to use. You can buy the Odense brand at the supermarket, or buy it online at kingarthurflour.com.

To use it, just sprinkle your work surface with a little confectioner's sugar (and your rolling pin) and then roll the marzipan out in a rectangle to fit your cake. Any extra can be re-rolled or balled up and stored in an airtight container in the fridge for later use.

Annie
post #10 of 32
Peggy Porschen's books have great recipes and step by step color photos to help. She makes beautiful Petit Fours using marzipan and fondant.

Good Luck I have the books but haven't tried yet. Let us know how it goes. Have Fun.

Quinte West, Ontario, Canada   www.TeriLovesCake.ca   Strictly Wheat & Gluten-Free         

 

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Quinte West, Ontario, Canada   www.TeriLovesCake.ca   Strictly Wheat & Gluten-Free         

 

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post #11 of 32
This is one of those things I would try out before I gave a price and took the order. icon_smile.gif
My Weight Loss Support Group is The Chunky Monkeys!
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My Weight Loss Support Group is The Chunky Monkeys!
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post #12 of 32
Petit fours are not easy to make. I totally undercharged the first time I made them and I never accepted another order of them! They are really pretty but not the easiest. My poured fondant had to keep being remelted and it was hard to coat the whole piece of cake. Good luck!!
post #13 of 32
Good news! There is a secretly easy way icon_smile.gif .... dipping, not pouring.

Bake your cake sheet and if you want to torte and fill, simple syrup them or whatever you want to do. If you want a traditional marzipan top, do that now to the whole sheet. At my shop, we add a thin layer of SMBC to the top and make sure it's super smooth. This will eliminate any imperfections in the cake surface.

Now freeze this bad boy solid and then cut into the desired size. For us, petit fours are 1x1x1" and petit fives are 2x2x2". Refreeze.

Make the "Quick Pour Fondant Icing" off of allrecipes.com and heat over a double boiler until it thins and is fairly warm. I have never used a thermometer, but I'd say its about 120 degrees F.

Your dipping set up will be a sheet tray, something high in the center (I like a full 5# fondant bucket), a glazing rack (like shown in the video), then something heavy to keep it from spinning or slipping (like another fondant bucket).

Pull out as many petit fours and you can dip before they soften (I can do like 30) and QUICKLY flip them over, insert a bamboo skewer (shortened if necessary), dip into fondant, turn it right side up, insert skewer into a hole in the rack, lower petit four to rack, remove skewer. Repeat. This is a bit of set up, but once you are going it is FAST. The excess fondant drips off (you can't re-use it but there isn't nearly as much run-off as in the video) and the warm fondant sets up very quickly against the frozen cake. By the time the tray is full, you can handle the first ones and put them into their cups (a paring knife or small offset spat will assist you.)

HTH!
post #14 of 32
Good news! There is a secretly easy way icon_smile.gif .... dipping, not pouring.

Bake your cake sheet and if you want to torte and fill, simple syrup them or whatever you want to do. If you want a traditional marzipan top, do that now to the whole sheet. At my shop, we add a thin layer of SMBC to the top and make sure it's super smooth. This will eliminate any imperfections in the cake surface.

Now freeze this bad boy solid and then cut into the desired size. For us, petit fours are 1x1x1" and petit fives are 2x2x2". Refreeze.

Make the "Quick Pour Fondant Icing" off of allrecipes.com and heat over a double boiler until it thins and is fairly warm. I have never used a thermometer, but I'd say its about 120 degrees F.

Your dipping set up will be a sheet tray, something high in the center (I like a full 5# fondant bucket), a glazing rack (like shown in the video), then something heavy to keep it from spinning or slipping (like another fondant bucket).

Pull out as many petit fours and you can dip before they soften (I can do like 30) and QUICKLY flip them over, insert a bamboo skewer (shortened if necessary), dip into fondant, turn it right side up, insert skewer into a hole in the rack, lower petit four to rack, remove skewer. Repeat. This is a bit of set up, but once you are going it is FAST. The excess fondant drips off (you can't re-use it but there isn't nearly as much run-off as in the video) and the warm fondant sets up very quickly against the frozen cake. By the time the tray is full, you can handle the first ones and put them into their cups (a paring knife or small offset spat will assist you.)

HTH!
post #15 of 32
Good news! There is a secretly easy way icon_smile.gif .... dipping, not pouring.

Bake your cake sheet and if you want to torte and fill, simple syrup them or whatever you want to do. If you want a traditional marzipan top, do that now to the whole sheet. At my shop, we add a thin layer of SMBC to the top and make sure it's super smooth. This will eliminate any imperfections in the cake surface.

Now freeze this bad boy solid and then cut into the desired size. For us, petit fours are 1x1x1" and petit fives are 2x2x2". Refreeze.

Make the "Quick Pour Fondant Icing" off of allrecipes.com and heat over a double boiler until it thins and is fairly warm. I have never used a thermometer, but I'd say its about 120 degrees F.

Your dipping set up will be a sheet tray, something high in the center (I like a full 5# fondant bucket), a glazing rack (like shown in the video), then something heavy to keep it from spinning or slipping (like another fondant bucket).

Pull out as many petit fours and you can dip before they soften (I can do like 30) and QUICKLY flip them over, insert a bamboo skewer (shortened if necessary), dip into fondant, turn it right side up, insert skewer into a hole in the rack, lower petit four to rack, remove skewer. Repeat. This is a bit of set up, but once you are going it is FAST. The excess fondant drips off (you can't re-use it but there isn't nearly as much run-off as in the video) and the warm fondant sets up very quickly against the frozen cake. By the time the tray is full, you can handle the first ones and put them into their cups (a paring knife or small offset spat will assist you.)

HTH!
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