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How do i make a thicker cheesecake?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
a customer i made a cheesecake for said that the texture wasnt thick enough. He said it made him think that maybe it wasnt a cheescake. Ouch, right? But he said the flavor was good (strawberry with lemon zest)


I thanked him for his critique, but now i have no idea how to make a cheesecake thicker. I have only ever made two, one practice and one for the customer (the second tasted waaay better, but textue was the same)


Ive heard to bothe decrease the egg amount, and to also increase it. (there are three in the recipe, for a (9" round)
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post #2 of 15
What else is in your recipe? Had it set up all the way? If it's underbaked, it'll be kind of creamy mooshy in the middle.
post #3 of 15
It sounds like you may not have blended your ingredients enough or undercooked it. And it's hard to tell when cheesecake is done. This description helped me. It should be wobbly, but not jiggly...
Here is a helpful explanation:
http://www.ehow.com/how_8181100_tell-cheesecake-baked-long-enough.html

As for the egg amount, it depends on the recipe...
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post #4 of 15
Try this website's recipe icon_smile.gif http://www.crumbboss.com/?p=62 crumbboss rocks!
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A down-to-earth South African who has a growing interest in fondant cakes...I've been bitten by the cake bug!
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post #5 of 15
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hm.. youre right, perhaps i didn't make it enough. i would guess i baked it for 40-45 minutes, though i honestly cant be sure anymore

@Jan: the london style was closest to mine. mine calls for24 oz cream cheese, 3 eggs, and 1/3 cup lemon juice. I wonder if the lemon juice could be the culprit?

obviously there are more ingredients to the cheesecake. if you guys think itll help ill post it.
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post #7 of 15
StormyHaze, did you check out the crumbboss video?
A down-to-earth South African who has a growing interest in fondant cakes...I've been bitten by the cake bug!
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post #8 of 15
Did you use a waterbath? Most cheesecakes I make take about an hour to bake. Then I'll turn the oven off, prop it open, and leave it for a hour. It does sound like maybe yours was underdone. Post the rest of the recipe if you would like, it might help icon_biggrin.gif
post #9 of 15
I have always tried to make those big tall New York style cheesecakes...and when they're baking in the oven (in their waterbath) in their springform pans, they look wonderful...until they cool and then they deflate and I've only got maybe 2 inches of cake. And it's not because they aren't done! So disappointing.

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post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

I have always tried to make those big tall New York style cheesecakes...and when they're baking in the oven (in their waterbath) in their springform pans, they look wonderful...until they cool and then they deflate and I've only got maybe 2 inches of cake. And it's not because they aren't done! So disappointing.



I was curious after reading this so I looked it up (gotta love google;o) it was said that if the batter was overmixed or mixed to fast that too much air would be in the batter causing it to deflate or crack. Maybe that will help you keep that beautiful tall cake icon_smile.gif
post #11 of 15
As someone mentioned above, I made the New York style cheesecake that is on crumbboss.com. This woman owns a bakery in New Jersey and has ALOT of youtube videos on how she makes all kinds of things for her bakery. Her website has the recipes and the youtube shows you the how-tos. I made her cheesecake in an 8 inch round pan and it turned out wonderful....two inches high!!!! There is no crust in this recipe. I guess that's how the New York style is. Check her out.
post #12 of 15
My cheesecakes are huge. They come to the top of the 3" pan, sometimes higher. Never once does one fall or crack. They are my favorite thing to make. Cheesecakes are like any other recipe. The ingredients must be in balance. There are many bad recipes out there.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
 Did you use a waterbath? Most cheesecakes I make take about an hour to bake. Then I'll turn the oven off, prop it open, and leave it for a hour. It does sound like maybe yours was underdone. Post the rest of the recipe if you would like, it might help icon_biggrin.gif

 

Every recipe I have use calls for turning off the oven and propping open the door at the end of the bake, which is something I always do and I always use a water bath. How do the professionals do it when they have to bake multiple cheesecakes for the bakery? Surely they are not turning their ovens off and on all day long. I decided to bake 2 cheesecakes for a friends New Years party and while I have never baked 2 cakes at same time (which is more manageable) so in the essence of saving time, I skipped the "turning off oven and propping open door part" so that I could get to the next cheesecake. The other "mistake" I made is when I mixed my batter I made a bit too much and decided to fill the pans almost to the rim thinking they cakes would be thick. Even though I use the jiggle method to determine if a cake is done, on these particular cakes the tops were getting way too dark so I pulled they out thinking they were over cooking. When the cakes were later cut into found the middle like pudding consistancy. Any suggests and answer to my questions? 

 

Thx

post #14 of 15

i like to use an instant read thermometer when i do cheesecakes--i do not mind a few poke holes in the top--target temp 150 - 160 degrees f--

 

if it goes over 150-155- the top will crack--not an exact science--adding a couple tablespoons flour can help eliminate cracks but i don't do this--

 

i'd recommend googling internal temperature of cheesecake and read up on it all--

 

alton brown said 165 on his show--i wrote it in my cookbook--but i mean some peeps like their cheesecake 'rare' --

 

i  rarely use water baths and i would not crack my oven and leave eggs and cheese in a state of diminishing temperature on purpose--in fact i get mine out onto the marble top counter to pull the temp down asap and i even use a fan to cool them so i can get them into the fridge---the stomach i save might be my own -- lol

 

there's a four hour accumulative window for cream cheese to be out of safe temp (which it is unsafe between 40 and 140 degrees)--so i try to err on the side of caution--

 

cheesecake thoughts for you--

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one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis View Post
 

i like to use an instant read thermometer when i do cheesecakes--i do not mind a few poke holes in the top--target temp 150 - 160 degrees f--

 

if it goes over 150-155- the top will crack--not an exact science--adding a couple tablespoons flour can help eliminate cracks but i don't do this--

 

i'd recommend googling internal temperature of cheesecake and read up on it all--

 

alton brown said 165 on his show--i wrote it in my cookbook--but i mean some peeps like their cheesecake 'rare' --

 

i  rarely use water baths and i would not crack my oven and leave eggs and cheese in a state of diminishing temperature on purpose--in fact i get mine out onto the marble top counter to pull the temp down asap and i even use a fan to cool them so i can get them into the fridge---the stomach i save might be my own -- lol

 

there's a four hour accumulative window for cream cheese to be out of safe temp (which it is unsafe between 40 and 140 degrees)--so i try to err on the side of caution--

 

cheesecake thoughts for you--

THIS, is the correct answer for the OP!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Doesn't matter if you use a water bath or not, doesn't matter how long you bake it or at what temp., but you've got to bake it until set (the eggs cook enough to set) at min. 150F.

 

You can make them as thin or thick as you want but they are a CUSTARD and must be treated as one, not over or under baked. Also there are many different textures based on the proportions and the ingredients in the custard (egg & cream cheese custard).

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