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How do you make Red Velvet Cake Taste Good? - Page 4

post #46 of 52
I wouldn't try the red velvet cake with Heavy cream. It might change the texture of the cake.

I made red velvet cupcakes and my buttermilk was too old, It had seperated maybe if I had shook it up it might have worked ,but anyway my cupcakes didn't rise. So I make sure my buttermilk is fresh and I shake it up first. Now you can make buttermilk with whole milk by adding one tablepoon of vinegar or Lemon juice to one cup.
post #47 of 52
I once heard a story of the beginnings of the Red Velvet cake had something to do with a chocolate shortage? Anyhow, supposedly bakers began using beet juice to darken the chocolate cake when they were forced to ration the chocolate. So I guess if that story is true, it was originally intended to be a diluted chocolate cake...

sorry for being off topic but thought it fit somewhere! icon_smile.gif
post #48 of 52
One more question about Cakeman's recipe:

It indicates that all three round cakes should bake at the same time, but I only have one pan.

If the remaining batter is sitting while one pan bakes at a time, will this somehow affect the batter/cake?

Thanks for the help.
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post #49 of 52
One more question about Cakeman's recipe:

It indicates that all three round cakes should bake at the same time, but I only have one pan.

If the remaining batter is sitting while one pan bakes at a time, will this somehow affect the batter/cake?

Thanks for the help.
Vounteer with Birthday Wishes (birthdaywishes.org)!  Volunteers donate party supplies and CAKES for birthday parties for kids living in homeless shelters.  Practice your craft and help a kid feel special on their birthday!  
Reply
Vounteer with Birthday Wishes (birthdaywishes.org)!  Volunteers donate party supplies and CAKES for birthday parties for kids living in homeless shelters.  Practice your craft and help a kid feel special on their birthday!  
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post #50 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmbitiousBeginner

One more question about Cakeman's recipe:

It indicates that all three round cakes should bake at the same time, but I only have one pan.

If the remaining batter is sitting while one pan bakes at a time, will this somehow affect the batter/cake?

Thanks for the help.



I think it does, it probably doesn't have a huge effect on it but I've seen differences when I waited to bake the batter. The taste is still the same but it doesn't rise as much as it would have. This has just been my own experience might be different for others.
post #51 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmbitiousBeginner

One more question about Cakeman's recipe:

It indicates that all three round cakes should bake at the same time, but I only have one pan.

If the remaining batter is sitting while one pan bakes at a time, will this somehow affect the batter/cake?

Thanks for the help.



Hopefully we are talking about the same version -- the version I am familiar with uses baking soda as its leavening agent. Baking soda reacts with acidic ingredients--the vinegar and the buttermilk will both start to react with the baking soda. Generally goods with baking soda need to be baked immediately as the reaction starts once it comes into contact with the acidic ingredients.

You will likely find that the longer the batter sits the less it will rise--there may not be much left by the time you get the third cake in the oven. Less rise will impact the texture of the cake--it will be more dense.
post #52 of 52
Red velvet originally came around before everything was processed. When it was in it's natural state there was a chemical reaction between the cocoa powder and the acid in the batter that in turn made it red. Everything we do now is because of all the processing that our ingredients go through these days.

Anyways, I used to be on the same page as most of you about red velvet being over-rated and nothing special, then on a hunt for a good recipe I compared a whole bunch to see any variations. I tried one that stuck out to me, it had much more cocoa than the rest. It's in Confetti Cakes Book and I absolutely loved it! Usually I taste, then say ok and stop. But this one... I kept eating, so I decided it must be really good! lol I also saw that Ron Ben Israel uses the same recipe icon_smile.gif
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