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Chocolate tempering question - Page 2

post #16 of 18
US temps:

Milk or White = 110 - 115
Bittersweet = 118 -120
Dark = 115 - 118

Double boiler method:

Heat ¾ of chocolate to temp above, remove from double boiler & add rest of chocolate, cool to 84 . Put back on double boiler, heat to (milk or white 97 - bittersweet 88-91 - dark 85-87) cool and use!
post #17 of 18
If I understand it right, some chocolates such as Merckens or Wilton melts don't require tempering. I believe that is because there is some parafin added. Good quality chocolate does require tempering. I use the seeding method mentioned - where you melt the chocolate and then add unmelted chocolate to cool down the chocolate to right temperature. I will admit that I use the microwave on 50% power to melt my chocolate and am very careful to stir often and not over heat it. You can dip a metal spoon in the chocolate and set it aside (not in refrig.) It should cool down and set up in a reasonable time period with a nice glossy sheen (say approximately 3 - 5 minutes.) If it doesn't harden, your chocolate isn't tempered. I don't use a thermometer - though may people do. You might want to google "tempering chocolate" and read more expert advice.
Love cakes!!
Valerie
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Love cakes!!
Valerie
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post #18 of 18
When we did chocolate tempering we weren't even allowed to use a thermometer.

It's easier when you melt the chocolate just enough so that some of it is still solid and start stirring. Or if the chocolate is totally melted and warm, add enough small solid pieces to make it thick like there is no way it's going to melt itself. start stirring.

Chocolate tempers BELOW the working temperature, so you have to bring it down down down and stir it until you can see surface tension happening. Meaning: if you move your spoon ever so slightly in the center of the bowl, you should see the chocolate ripple nearly all the way to the edges as all of the stable crystals are connecting as it tempers. Like a big chocolate net.

THEN you bring it up to working temperature with a heat gun until it is glossy and around body temperature (touch it, it might be slightly warm or you feel nothing at all). If there are streaks along the surface, it's likely to be too cold and while it might be "tempered" it will look streaky after setting.

Dribble chocolate on a metal spatula and if it's right, it should have good surface tension (it will look more rounded, untempered will be runny and flat... maybe even redder) and it should set quickly
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