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How do you get a scratch cake to be light and moist? - Page 2

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

Quote:
Originally Posted by VaNellaCakes

I am absolutely new to 'proper' baking, basically, so please excuse my ignorance, but doesn't having a moist cake make it difficult to stack? Does using dowels *completely* avoid a lovely yummy moist cake collapsing?

Nothing worse than a dry cake but I am worried about stacking moist cakes, and surely it's better for the cake to be sturdy than collapsing. And you can make it moister with the filling.

Any advice/clarification?

TIA icon_smile.gif



A cake doesn't have to be "sturdy" for stacking icon_confused.gif You can stack jello if you have the proper support system. Cake doesn't support cake. It's the support system that keeps everything from collapsing so NO "having a moist cake" doesn't make it difficult to stack.



OK sorry. Thanks.
post #17 of 25
Of course, you're right, mamawrobin - moistness has nothing to do with it. My signature line should explain it all: "I know my own mind... and it's around here somewhere" [even though I can't always find it when I need it!].
Marianna
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post #18 of 25
Here's some links to cake baking you might be interested in reading over.

And... look for books at your library on baking & baking science if you're really getting into scratch baking now. Lots of help there!

Also... theres the measuring of ingredients in scratch cakes.
Many times the way the flour & sugar are measured can ruin a good recipe. A cup of flour thats scooped out of the sack then leveled off, will be compacted, so will contain more flour than a cup of flour thats measured with the spoon & fill method. Plus there's measuring sifted flour or sifting flour after measuring. These are things that can mess up a recipe if not followed.
I'm pretty positive you know this kind of stuff anyway but thought I'd throw it in as a helpful hint for whomever doesn't. icon_biggrin.gif


Links.. Happy reading!

http://www.finecooking.com/articles/ratios-for-great-cakes.aspx?

http://www.bakingandbakingscience.com/Cakes.htm

http://www.baking911.com/cakes/101ingredients.htm

This link is to one of my favourite sites. A thread on baking a good scratch cake. Some good books recommened from other posters.

http://www.cheftalk.com/forum/thread/60777/the-science-of-baking-cakes
post #19 of 25
Ditto Sylvia Weinstock Classic Yellow! It's amazing and I use the original one without the extra milk and ginger and if this cake comes out dry it is a user error! I've done cakes of all sizes and cupcakes and they are so moist and the flavor is unbelievable!
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeprof

Nothing against freezing but really should not need to freeze a scratch cake to make it moist. I only make scratch cakes, never freeze and never have a problem with them being moist.

Will second what someone else said about overbaking, I was surprised to learn how quickly a cake can become overbaked.


Hi there cakeprof,
Can you please share your yellow cake and chocolate cake recipe that you use? I'd love try it and see what mistakes I am making?
I see some tiny crumbs on the cake tester and I leave the cake in the oven a few minutes...somehow I think it will be gooey and un cooked from the center.I am lost!
- h
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2009 was MY year!I LOST 83lbs in less than 9 months.I did it WITHOUT stepping foot in any gym or spending $$$.2010 is a "happy" year for me.THANK YOU LORD for blessing me.teenbatateen.blogspot.com
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post #21 of 25
It really is practice and getting a feel for what you are doing. For example there are some cakes that I will take out with just a few crumbs on the tester. Cake continues to cook after it's out of the oven so sometimes if you leave it until you get a completely clean toothpick you'll end up with a dry cake.

Practice will tell you how many crumbs are too many crumbs.
post #22 of 25
honeyscakes have you tried the Sylvia Weinstock? It is amazingly moist and doesn't require freezing either, I also take the cake out when a few crumbs are on the toothpick, I NEVER wait for it to come out clean! I wait for it to be crumbs but not sticky/liquid/goopy. Hope that helps!

Oh and a great chocolate cake recipe- Double Chocolate Layer Cake off of epicurious.com. It's incredible! So moist that I'm starting to think I shouldn't freeze it because it's getting too moist with freezing! It's amazing, don't skip the ganache if you try it!
post #23 of 25
I only use scratch cake for my cakes as well and they are always moist. My question is how do you convert them to other flavors. You see that most of the bakers use the WASC recipe and they use pudding and yogurts and the sherbert to change the flavors. I get thrown off as to the substituting part. I get the yogurt sub for the sour cream and the creamers for the liquid. But what about if you are putting a flavored syrup where does that substitution come in. Help!!!
Thanks
post #24 of 25
My biggest problem with using white/yellow scratch cake for a wedding is the refrigerator issue because most of my fillings require they be kept chilled. And I always deliver cold wedding cake.

My experience is that my white/yellow scratch cake does not bounce back good enough at room temperature. Wvsc (I use vanilla instead of almond icon_smile.gif works so good for me for a tier cake.

Test if for yourself--if you chill your butter cakes--see if they are as soft after they are friged or frozen & get back to room temp. I mean you can microwave it to restore it good as new but you can't microzap a 14" iced cake either. Chocolate, carrot, banana yes--white/yellow no--not mine.

But I loves me some Sylvia yellow cake!!! You can leave it on the counter and it doesn't even dry out --it's awesome. Just not for my tier cakes.

And the moistness factor is different than mouthfeel--it's tighter/chewier after it's chilled to me and the people who tested my cakes. It could be described as drier because it goes down the throat a little rougher but the moisture really is the same, the texture is not as soft.
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post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maria925

I use cake flour and sour cream and my scratch cakes are always moist & light & fluffy.

For my yellow I use Slyvia Weinstock's original. You can google it and find the recipe...best yellow cake recipe ever!!!

I also have started freezing my cakes and that definitely will make your cake moist!!!



I use this one as well and it's actually in the recipe section here at CC. I LOVE this cake by Sylvia!

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-quote-6887232.html
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John 14:6
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