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gas bubbles forming under fondant - Page 2

post #16 of 55
i flash freeze my bc cake for 5-9 minutes before I apply the fondant. then no more chilling. period. that makes the Bc nice and firm to apply your fondant but cake is not chilled all the way thru, so condensation not an issue for me.

Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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post #17 of 55
that would explain this last cake having issues.....it was in the fridge all day where are others only half hour or so ...thank you so much....
your cakes are flawless .............really amazing.....
post #18 of 55
YW!

for me and my cakes and where I live: cake+cold=disaster
LOL

Thank you for the nice words too!

Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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post #19 of 55
Thread Starter 
Ok, so it sounds like cold cake = bad. I usually work on a cold cake since I do a lot of carving and that makes it a lot easier. I have a carved wedding cake this weekend so I am going to do it at room temp and we shall see how it goes.

Thanks all.
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post #20 of 55
Sorry, I do not want to mislead.

LOTS of people ice and fondnat cold cakes with no problems at all. It does not work for me, for some reason.

Many people use cold cakes to carve, and I do not think that is a problem. I would try to let it come to room temp before i did the final ice or fondanting; because I know I would have problems in my environment if I did not.

But like I said above, lots of folks keep their stuff chilled thru the whole process and do fine.

I think it varies by the recipes used, your climate, the humidity of your cooler, etc. We each have to go thru some trial and error to find what works for each of us.

I did not mean to imply that cold cakes are a no-no for everyone; just that in my circumstances I have found issues with it. Please do not stop doing something that works for you.

Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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Sharon Zambito

SugarEd Productions Online Sugar Art School 
www.sugaredproductions.com

 

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post #21 of 55
i agree with K8 though as i worked on room temp cakes, baked the day before and the next day there were bubbles all over my cakes (i had made 6 6" for a wedding and only one was gas-less) i think they just plague anyone, anytime. nasty cake gas wrecking havoc on our pretty cakes! i'm going to try the pin trick next time. icon_smile.gif
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wisdom is knowledge put into action
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post #22 of 55
Thread Starter 
Ok, maybe it is the use of buttercream. Has anyone had this happen with a cake covered in jelly and then fondant?

Again, thanks all.
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post #23 of 55
Would fondant on jelly even work? I would not want to try that.

When I carve a cake thats different, because its only crumb coated to the carving point.....I think a quick chill to cover is ok any longer like sugarshack says its chilled thru and then you get the moisture problem.
post #24 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by dyrinella

Ok, maybe it is the use of buttercream. Has anyone had this happen with a cake covered in jelly and then fondant?

Again, thanks all.



Not that I can remember. It's worth a try.

But the fondant is still going to trap air which to me is the greater point not stickyness.

So far the trapped air has trumped sticky-ness.

To me it's the nature of the air in the cake rather than any surface adherence issue.

The condition of the surface does not eliminate the air, the fondant is still flexible.
one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
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one baker's 'never ever do' is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
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post #25 of 55
Thread Starter 
I am just thinking that the jelly has a really sticky surface so things are more likely to fully stick and maybe there is less of a chance of air.

I have to admit that I feel so much better hearing from all of you that you have similar problems. I have been in business for years and work with fondant all of the time and it gets embarrassing to admit you have basic issues, you know?
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post #26 of 55
I really think the problem is wait time. You have to let the cake settle or place a heavy book on it to prevent the air bubbles.

I had air bubble problems for a year, until I changed by caking days. I bake on Wed, fill and crumb cake on Thurs, finish decorating on Fri. The overnight settling got rid of all of my air problems.

If you don't have time, place a heavy book on the crumb coated cake for a few hours to force the air out.

good luck
hamie
hamie
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hamie
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post #27 of 55
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice. I was just thinking of trying that amount of wait time. I am guessing that after you crumb coat you do not refrigerate. Is that correct?

That book idea is really clever!
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post #28 of 55
Just to clarify...I am making a cake today that I will freeze. The wedding cake is due the 12th (Saturday). So ...do you all think I can thaw on Wednesday night....fill and crumb coat Thursday......do I wrap with saran to prevent it from being stale and put a book or tile on top...then fondant and decorate on friday?
post #29 of 55
Thread Starter 
Chandra, that should be fine. If you are worried about it getting dry just brush the inside with a little simple syrup. If you loosely put some plastic wrap over the top after the crumb coating is set then all the better.
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post #30 of 55
Here's another thought on the "cake fart" problem. I've found that dense cakes tend to "fart" less than cakes that start out with more air in them -- regardless of temperature changes. A box cake, for example, ends up quite light = a lot of air in the cake. A mud cake, a pound cake, or homemade moist yellow cake (Toba Garrett's recipe, for example) has less air to start with and, therefore, less air to blow out as the cake settles. What do you all think?
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