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A Thread for all UK bakers!! - Page 198

post #2956 of 16425
Hi all, I've just spent ages reading through this thread, I, new to cake making and just been doing cupcakes up to now for my family, I just have one question when I cover my cakes with fondant I store them in an airtight container over night and the next morning the fondant has gone all sticky and gooey, how do I prevent this? As if I want to do cakes for other people (I eventually want to have my own business) I don't want to give them a cake with sticky fondant?
Thanks x
post #2957 of 16425
Don't put them in an air tight container, that's what causes the icing to get gooey. Put them in a cardboard cake box instead.
post #2958 of 16425
I don't think u should keep fondant in an airtight container ( or the fridge). A cardboard box or a loose cover over the cake should do. The fondant creates a seal around the cake so it will stay fresh that way.
post #2959 of 16425

Anyone had a chance to try out the new Squires Kitchen sugarpaste? http://www.squires-shop.com/index.php?p=product&id=9756&parent=100
 

"Taste your words before you feed them to people."
www.sugaredsaffron.co.uk
www.facebook.com/SugaredSaffron
Reply
"Taste your words before you feed them to people."
www.sugaredsaffron.co.uk
www.facebook.com/SugaredSaffron
Reply
post #2960 of 16425

Hi there all you lovely UK bakers.

I recently tried to make sugar lace using the Sugarveil powder and silicone mats.  It took an awful long time to dry.  I tried putting it in the oven, but still 2 days later, the lace is tacky and breaks up when I try to remove it from the mat.

 

I was wondering if any of you have had similar experiences.  Is it our current weather that is to blame?

 

Tracey


Edited by Trac Brax - 1/7/13 at 6:39am
post #2961 of 16425

Hi Guys :)

 

I thouight I should join here, as I liv in the UK, i have plenty a couple of questions for you guys in the UK :)

 

1. Im openining a small cake/bake shop selling, muffins, brownies, traybakes sandwiches etc, not bespoke cakes or anything  although Ive done a course in that its not really what I consider myself to be good, at more of a simple home baked food shop, can I ask your opinion on my avatar? Its our proposed shop logo, which is based in a village

 

2. Costings... i'll admit, Im a chef, I nver got into the admin side of things, I have spent numerous hours trying to cost things properly and i dont seem to be getting anywhere, I will be using a big supplier so costs are generally cheaper than the supermarket, but in terms oof working out the actual sale price of each different cake/tray bake as they will all be made fresh seems a very tedious process, any spreadsheets etc out there that might help?

 

Thanks all

 

Mark

post #2962 of 16425
I had a lot of trouble with it too, I guess it's the moisture in the air. The only thing that worked for me is putting it in my electric oven with the heat on very low.

Another thing which affects it quite significantly is its age. Is the bag fresh? If its over 10-12 months the quality is dramatically affected. Also, you need to let it rest at least over night before you use it
post #2963 of 16425
hi, I'm just starting out in cake decorating and so far have only been learning by book's. what have people fount to be the best way to learn by book's, taking a course or by watching videos.
post #2964 of 16425

Hi Lilmzbubbles

I think you can't beat going on a course to learn about cake decorating.  Some can be a bit expensive, but they are worth it.  And you get to meet other bakers! 

post #2965 of 16425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilmzbubbles View Post

hi, I'm just starting out in cake decorating and so far have only been learning by book's. what have people fount to be the best way to learn by book's, taking a course or by watching videos.

I have attended a number of Debbie Drown's workshops which are fantastic - I can highly recommend.  I also try to get books from the library first to see if I like them before buying. I found DVDs esp good for making flowers as you can stop, start and replay as you are making them.  Youtube is also good for just generally expanding your knowledge on various topics.

post #2966 of 16425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilmzbubbles View Post

hi, I'm just starting out in cake decorating and so far have only been learning by book's. what have people fount to be the best way to learn by book's, taking a course or by watching videos.

I am self taught, never been to a class. I used books, youtube (so invaluable), this site, Craftsy (recommend maggie Austins) , and Paul Bradford's online courses. You don't need to spend 100's (usually over £200-£300 for a good decorator) of pounds on classes, you can buy them for around £20 online. Watch a few videos, get good at it and then if you feel you need a class with a famous decorator then go for it. You'll have the underlying skills in order to apply what they are teaching you to different things.
post #2967 of 16425
Hi new to this site so still looking around. Just
started making cakes for family & friends. Been asked to do a 50th birthday cake fot 100 people. Can someone tell me what size cake/cakes i need for this pls.
Thanks in advance.
Dendee63
post #2968 of 16425

oh wow a uk thread!!  :)

 

 

I have a question, how can you get very white buttercream??  I'm wanting to pipe some 'white' roses on to cupcakes to make a white rose bouquet for my mums mothers day cake, but I don't quite get it white enough!  I use half trex and half stork, which yes makes it paler but still not white as I've seen in some photos!  Hope someone can help :)

post #2969 of 16425
For white buttercream I add the tiniest amount of wilton s violet gel paste colour. Add a tiny bit, mix it in and add until you are satisfied with the colour.the violet counteracts the yellow. To get a true white white you'll need to use all trex which then makes it a frosting not buttercream. You can also try adding white powder colour (titanium dioxide) but I don't know if that alters the buttercream in any way. I'd imagine it doesn't, but I would assume you'd need to use a lot to get a brilliant white.
post #2970 of 16425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lea17 View Post

oh wow a uk thread!!  icon_smile.gif


I have a question, how can you get very white buttercream??  I'm wanting to pipe some 'white' roses on to cupcakes to make a white rose bouquet for my mums mothers day cake, but I don't quite get it white enough!  I use half trex and half stork, which yes makes it paler but still not white as I've seen in some photos!  Hope someone can help icon_smile.gif

I use this to work out serving sizes of each cake.

A 12"/9"/6" round will serve 106 or a 10"/8"/6" square will serve 100 or two 9"x13" sheet cakes will serve 100.

HTH
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