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Store brand butter vs. Land o'Lakes - Page 2

post #16 of 23
You know, there may be a difference but I am not sure. I use the cheapest I can find. I used to use Land O lakes but it has gone up dramatically in my area. So now I use whatever is cheapest and have had NO complaints on difference in taste and have no shortage of orders. However, for IMBC or SMBC I would probably use a higher end brand but for right now I use the store brand or COSTCO Block for everything! But I still use butter and not margarine...
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Be the change you want to see in the world!!!

To the world you might be one person, but to one person you mean the world.

Baking is life's true Joy!
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post #17 of 23
Sam's Club salted- 4lbs. I just freeze it until needed.
post #18 of 23
I have been using store brand butter for all my baking and occassionaly I would purchase the imported butters from Ireland and Italy, other than color that they are paler there is absolutely no difference in taste. This is one place where you can honestly save your money and see no difference.
mary
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mary
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post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cristieb11

What are the euro butter brands? Can you get them at Trader Joe's? What other stores might I be able to find them in?


Plugra IS a euro brand, or at least a euro "style" butter, and definitely at TJ's. At $3.29 it is a steal for high-end butter. As I mentioned, it's far cheaper than I can normally find LOL in the market.

I wouldn't hesitate to use the cheap stuff in my batter but my Costco doesn't have unsalted butter and Smart+Final butter is barely cheaper than the TJ's store brand...about $2.50/lb. I don't often see unsalted butter for under that price.
post #20 of 23
I agree about the Great Value brand butter! I started using it and I have never received more compliments on the taste of my icing and cakes. I use the unsalted for kids cakes and 1/2 salted 1/2 unsalted for adult cakes. The kids like the extra sweet icing(so do I) but most adults find it a little too sweet!
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Children will soon forget your presents. They will never forget your presence.
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post #21 of 23
I have just always used blue bonnett sticks. I get great reviews and everything is good. I have thought about changing just to see if theres something better out there.
Mother of a beautiful little girl and a precious little boy with Autism. I am blessed!!
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Mother of a beautiful little girl and a precious little boy with Autism. I am blessed!!
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post #22 of 23

You really need to research about those "Natural flavorings".  Why would butter or anything so simple need to have any type of flavoring added?  Check the label on salted butter and it will say, "cream and salt" with no need for added flavorings.  You might be surprised or shocked what those flavorings really are.

post #23 of 23

Here are the grading definitions for butter in the U.S.  I'm pretty sure the only ingredients can be cream and salt. (Not sure where the natural flavoring thing is coming from - I've never seen that on a package of butter in the midwest).

 

The quality of butter is based on its body, texture, flavour, and appearance. In the United States, the Department of Agriculture (USDA) assigns quality grades to butter based on its score on a standard quality point scale. Grade AA is the highest possible grade; Grade AA butter must achieve a numerical score of 93 out of 100 points based on its aroma, flavour, and texture. Salt (if present) must be completely dissolved and thoroughly distributed. Grade A butter is almost as good, with a score of 92 out of 100 points. Grade B butter is based on a score of 90 points, and it usually is used only for cooking or manufacturing. The flavour of Grade B is not as fresh and sweet, and its body may be crumbly, watery, or sticky.

The U.S. grade shield is usually found on the main panel of the butter package, but may be shown on the side or end panel. U.S. Grade AA and Grade A are the quality ratings most often seen. However, U.S. Grade B butter is also sold in some areas.

U.S. Grade AA
  • Delicate, sweet flavor, with a fine, highly pleasing aroma
  • Made from high-quality fresh, sweet cream
  • Smooth, creamy texture with good "spreadability"
  • May possess a slight feed and a definite cooked flavor.

U.S. Grade A

  • Pleasing flavor
  • Made from fresh cream
  • Fairly smooth texture
  • Rates close to top grade
  • May possess any of the following flavors to a slight degree: Acid, aged, bitter, coarse, flat, smothered, and storage.
  • May possess feed flavor to a definite degree.

U.S. Grade B

  • May have slightly acid flavor
  • Readily acceptable to many consumers
  • May possess any of the following flavors to a slight degree: Malty, musty, neutralizer, scorched, utensil, weed, and whey.
  • May possess any of the following flavors to a definite degree: Acid, aged, bitter, smothered, storage, and old cream; feed flavor to a pronounced degree.

 

 

Hope this helps someone. :)
 
Liz

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