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post #46 of 435
I am trying to find out more about Louisiana how can I go about that? I went to the health & hospital website but am unable to find more information about home bakeries. I've been doing the cakes from my grandmother's back porch where there is a kitchen setup do any of you know if if Louisiana allows you to do in home bakery if you have a seperate kitchen?
post #47 of 435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazmin

Great informatin, my husband and I were thinking to move to Utah. I could open a home business there.



I live in Utah and it varies by city. Even though you can get past the HD, you may not be able to get a home-occupation license from the city. As far as I know, Salt Lake, Sandy and now Payson are the only cities that allow it. Others are supposed to be added soon.
post #48 of 435
Okay I just called the Alaska Dept of Health. You may sell out of your home if you have a separate kitchen set up, that is closed off to your family and separate entrance. However they have no regulations and you do not need to be permitted to sell at craft fairs and farmers markets. Also for a bakery you may use any commercial kitchen i.e. church or rec kitchens. Is it clear what I am saying?
post #49 of 435
I am trying to find more info on Virginia, the dept of Agr. webpage is not very friendly. Anyone knows how to get a permit or if you'll get in trouble for baking a few cakes at home?
Thanks!
post #50 of 435
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Being up to my elbows in cream sounded a lot more glamorous!
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Being up to my elbows in cream sounded a lot more glamorous!
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post #51 of 435
Umm...anyone know anything about New Mexico? I realize that it is reported to be a no, but is it like other states where if you have a separate kitchen you can work from home?
Being up to my elbows in cream sounded a lot more glamorous!
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Being up to my elbows in cream sounded a lot more glamorous!
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post #52 of 435
I didn't read all the way through the Idaho site. But I have spoke to the Health Department in my county, and it is ok. We of course have to do all the tax stuff if we are selling. And it is reccommended to take a health class through the health department, and we can pay a fee to have them come out and inspect the kitchen. But that is all optional. According to the Health Department they don't consider Cake Decorating hazardous. Apparently they don't think we can hurt anyone with a cake.

How ever I do know that it varies by county. Because My MIL's Health Dept say no.
Life may not be the party we hoped for . . . but while we're here we might as well dance!

Mommy to Cameron 13, Deirdra 10, Andrew 8, Emily 6.
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Life may not be the party we hoped for . . . but while we're here we might as well dance!

Mommy to Cameron 13, Deirdra 10, Andrew 8, Emily 6.
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post #53 of 435
okay, I did a little research of my own. The laws of New Mexico are that you can have a home business depending on your county. Just call the local city hall and ask.
Being up to my elbows in cream sounded a lot more glamorous!
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Being up to my elbows in cream sounded a lot more glamorous!
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post #54 of 435
Connecticut only allows it if you have a separate kitchen and some towns require you not only to have a separate kitchen but a three bay sink..all commercial appliances including a commercial dishwasher. I thought that was the most ridiculous thing i ever heard of. You need to take out a second mortgage on your home to have a second kitchen built. Some towns don't require commercial equipment or stainless steel just a seperate kitchen. I am working on getting that law changed so that those of us who love to bake can do so out of our homes. NC has a great model I'd like to use. At least in Charlotte. I think it is unfair when there are restaurants whose kitchens are worse than any home kitchen. There are about over 200 people in CT who bake out of there homes with no permit and have been doing it for years. They just can't advertise and have to rely on word of mouth. I am also looking into raising money for a community kitchen.
post #55 of 435
Kansas regulations are a bit tricky. I say this because eventhough the Kansas Food Code says that you have to have a completely separate kitchen in your home that you make food out of for the consumer, the state isn't going to bug you unless they have a complaint about you.

I was having some weird responses from customers last year when I would tell them that I was an "in home" business. Well, here is a letter I wrote to the Kansas head of the food safety division... the ones who enforce all the regulations. This is a copy of my email to him on Sunday, November 16, 2008 and his response....

Hello Mr. Moris,

Thank you for taking my email. I have an in-home bakery in Overland Park Kansas, and make special occasion cakes for the "end consumer". I have a separate, full kitchen in my home, free of children and any animals, use cake mixes and non-perishable cake fillings, sell directly to the consumer, and I adhere to Health Department guidelines for sanitation and cleanliness. But, I am not licensed because I was told by someone at the Dept. of Ag.(I'm sorry I don't remember his name...but it was a phone conversation in the early part of September of 2007) that I fall under the "Farmer's Market Clause". Because of this, he said, I don't need a health license. You can imagine how happy I was to hear that!

In the last 6 months, though, I have had a few customers call me about potentially making a cake for them. But, after I tell them that I am an in-home bakery, they asked me, "Do you know that in-home bakeries are illegal in Kansas?"

The first time I was asked that, I politely answered them that I fell under the "Farmer's Market Clause" and reassured them that in-home bakeries ARE LEGAL in Kansas. After the second person told me similar information, I had asked them where they had gotten that information at. Them told me that a cake maker in Leawood had told them that info. She also has stated the "illegality" of in-home bakeries on her website.

Please, don't take me wrong. I don't know who this baker is; I have no quarrels with her. My concern is, ...are in-home bakeries REALLY illegal in Kansas like she says? Was the info I was given last year incorrect? Is it true that "anybody who makes and sells any kind of food for the public" has to be inspected and licensed? I want to make sure that everything I make and sell is legal. I have a real talent and a deep love for what I do, and I intend to grow my business in the future.

If what I was told by the Dept. of Ag. last year was true, could you please send me that "Farmer's Market Clause" by email, if possible? If what I was told was incorrect, could you please point me in the direction of what I should do and who I should talk to to get inspected and licensed.

Thank you so much for your time and attention on this matter.
I hope you have a wonderful week!



HIS RESPONSE:

Annie,

I just looked at your website, and I agree, you have a great talent. You probably talked to me last year, and that information is still correct. If you sell non-potentially hazardous baked goods directly to the end consumer, you are not required to have a license. The Kansas Dept. Of Agriculture will still expect you to follow guidelines set by the Kansas Food Code, and for your information, even though you are not required to have a license, if we receive a complaint, we have the authority to inspect any facility that produces or sells food in the state of Kansas. I will attach a handout that we have on our website www.ksda.gov that explains what can be sold at farmers market without a license.


Steve Moris

Program Manager

Division of Food Safety and Lodging

Kansas Dept. Of Agriculture



Well! That just shored up my confidence! I now knew that what the other baker was saying was wrong.... Needless to say, "the right hand didn't know what the left hand was doing". I found out the hard way(some of you guys' worst business nightmare) that Overland Park is the ONLY city in the whole dern state that requires EVERY food business to be health licensed and inspected. Yep, that same baker called the city health inspectors on me and they came to pay me a little visit. She even called the state and told them that I was selling cheesecakes(which I wasn't) so that they would come out, too. A few weeks later, she called the city again and told them about other in-home bakers in OP that weren't licensed....she doesn't play nicely with others in the sandbox, ya know what I'm sayin'? thumbsdown.gif

The city was very nice to deal with, though. I just had to make a few adjustments, put in a bit more lighting, and pay the $100 annual licensing fee. They realized, after the second phone call to the city, that this baker was just trying to get rid of her competition. They also realized that the other in-home bakers were going off of info that was given to them from the State, and they all though that they were legal, too. The city probibly figured that this was all a huge can of worms that was being opened and that they would be wasting their time and resources chasing it all down,...so they dropped it.

The state was even better to deal with. They came out, I showed them the email from Mr. Moris and assured them that I do not sell perishable items. The inspector said, "Yeah, Steve's my boss. If he says you're good then we have no problem with you."

So, a few lessons for all to be learned here.

1. In Kansas, you're fine if you sell non-perishable goods from your home directly to your clients. thumbs_up.gif

2. If there is a complaint, they have the right to come out and inspect and require you to bring it up to code, BUT you still DO NOT have to get licensed. icon_wink.gif

3. Overland Park... is a whole 'nother story. icon_rolleyes.gif

4. If you're thinking of throwing your competition under the bus just to get rid of them....don't do it! Remember the old saying, "What you put into the lives of others will come back to you." icon_smile.gif
post #56 of 435
The list says that Nevada is a no...that's not accurate. I just got my license and its about whether you are in the city or county limits. And you don't receive just the business license, you have to also apply for a home occupational permit too.

Just an update
post #57 of 435
I'm in Phoenix, AZ and it was a no on the chart.... So does that mean I can get in trouble for selling cakes? I only plan to sell to family, friends, and friends of friends. Is that bad? And is there anyone in my area that can help me out with pricing? So far I've only done freebees. I'm charging for a 12x18 cake this weekend but aparently I'm waaaay under. $40! I was put on the spot and had no time to really think about it so thats what I came up with. If anyone can share their prices just to give me an idea, that would be awsome!!! thanksicon_smile.gif
post #58 of 435
Im in Louisiana and the only way you can do cakes from your home is if you have a seperate kitchen detached from your home. Such a bummer
post #59 of 435
Anyone here from Ontario, Canada? I am pretty sure you don't need a license to operate a cake business from your home kitchen....
post #60 of 435
Any one here from Texas (Dallas County area) sale out of their home kitchen? Because I personally know of several ladies that do. Yet this list says "NO", it's not allowed. I'm wondering if there's a similar clause like that of Annieos in Kansas? Hmm....

I'm going to look into it cause I def want to start my own lil biz....NOT that I'm ever going to call anyone either. I think that's just so mean.

Thanks!
"Life will not give you more than what you give to it!" - Zandi
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"Life will not give you more than what you give to it!" - Zandi
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