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Paint Fondant and use Luster Dust

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
How do you paint fondant and what do you use? Also, how do you use luster dust? And, where do you buy both of them? I would apprecitate any help with this. Thanks a million.
post #2 of 27
You can paint fondant with straight gel color (I prefer mixing it with vodka) or with the variets of dusts that are out there (just not the Wilton shimmer dust). Using straight color gel can take awhile to dry, so I like to mix mine with vodka (you can also use clear vanilla or lemon extract or gin or everclear--Don't use water!!). I just mix until I get a nice paint consistency and use a good quality brush and then paint away!

Luster dust can be either brushed on dry or painted on mixing with any of the above ingredients. It is just a matter of what look you would like.

Fondant and luster dust can be found pretty much on any online cake shop. I tend to go to the following shops:

Country Kitchen
The Baker's Kitchen
Cakes by Sam
Beryl's

And there are tons more!
Missy

"It's the truth. It's actual. Everything is satisfactual. It's a zip a dee doo dah day!"
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Missy

"It's the truth. It's actual. Everything is satisfactual. It's a zip a dee doo dah day!"
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post #3 of 27
I agree with missyek. However, I like using lemon extract the best as it seems to flow better. Also leaves fewer streaks. I use vodka for gold or silver dust as sometimes they don't dry when using lemon extract. Here is a cake I did that was completely painted in luster dust.
LL
post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks a million. What kind of paint brushes do you use and how long does it usually take to dry? This is very helpful.
post #5 of 27
Yep, I use lemon juice and I bought all my luster dusts from caljava.com. I bought a pack of paintbrushes at Ben Franklin craft store and bought all my gel colors at Walmart. I do have some Americolor colors which I bought from CC.
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Matt 18:20 "For where two or three come together in my name, there am I with them."

Pray wherever, whenever!
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post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lizzyanne1

Thanks a million. What kind of paint brushes do you use and how long does it usually take to dry? This is very helpful.



I bought a pack of brushes a the craft store that was located in the cake isle that have nice soft bristles but Ive seen many people just using those cheap red, blue, yellow childrens brushes. I don't think I would use those for wet purposes because they will leave streaks. You could dust dry powder with them though. The better brushes won't leave nasty streaks when wet. I buy my luster dust at my local cake decor shop. Also, it usually takes maybe 15 minutes or half an hour for the paint to set. Not long really.
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lizzyanne1

Thanks a million. What kind of paint brushes do you use and how long does it usually take to dry? This is very helpful.


I use sable brushes, in a variety sizes. The reason I use sable is because they don't lose hair, which can end up on your cake. Well worth the investment. The luster/petal dust only takes a few minutes to dry. If it streaks (which it always does), I paint over it again after it dries. I do this as many times as necessary. If your painting a cake like mine, it takes HOURS. We're talking at least 8. However, if your just painting a cookie, it may only take a couple of minutes. It takes exactly the same as if you were coloring in a coloring book.

I'm looking forward to seeing your work.
post #8 of 27
How do you get really good coverage when painting? Do you have to paint several coats? What should the consistency be like?
Thanks for your help.
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathyw

How do you get really good coverage when painting? Do you have to paint several coats? What should the consistency be like?
Thanks for your help.



I must say it's a real challenge to get good coverage without going to far. If you apply to much the surface gets clumpy and gariny. To little and the fondant can show through and looks streaky. I apply one coat, let it dry, then apply subsequent coats as needed. It's almost impossible to describe the consistency. It definitely needs to be watery rather than thick. I once tried to measure the ration of lemon extract to luster dust but that didn't seem to work. Also, it depends on the color. Sorry I can't describe it better.
post #10 of 27
Since we're on the subject I have a question: When painting a cake using lustre dust and lemon extract (or other clear alcohol), it's been my experience that:

A) the alcohol evaporates sooo fast in the container that I'm constantly adding to the lustre dust (hence using an inordinate amount of alcohol), and

B) After painting the cake using the alcohol and the alcohol evaporates from the cake, one is left with a powdery texture which comes off in your hands if you go anywhere near the cake.

So, my question(s) are -- how does one deal with these situations? Or is that just par for the course?
To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
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To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
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post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Since we're on the subject I have a question: When painting a cake using lustre dust and lemon extract (or other clear alcohol), it's been my experience that:

A) the alcohol evaporates sooo fast in the container that I'm constantly adding to the lustre dust (hence using an inordinate amount of alcohol), and

B) After painting the cake using the alcohol and the alcohol evaporates from the cake, one is left with a powdery texture which comes off in your hands if you go anywhere near the cake.

So, my question(s) are -- how does one deal with these situations? Or is that just par for the course?



I don't leave my container open so I'm lnot having the evaportion problem. I take s syringe, extract out lthe amount that I need, then put the cap back on the bottle.

I've never had a powdery texture so not sure what's happening. Could it be you are applying too much dust? I'll be interested to see other responses.
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairytale


I don't leave my container open so I'm lnot having the evaportion problem. I take s syringe, extract out lthe amount that I need, then put the cap back on the bottle.

I've never had a powdery texture so not sure what's happening. Could it be you are applying too much dust? I'll be interested to see other responses.



I take a small bowl (really small, like a finger bowl) and mix the dust and alcohol. When that didn't work, I use a small tupperware bowl with a plastic tight-fitting lid, which helped some, but not much.

As for the powdery texture, I always get that, no matter what alcohol I use. The only time I don't is on my gumpaste flowers when I steam them (not practical for a fondant cake). For gilding I switched to using an oil (veggie oil) and mixing with that. That works well, but it's only for very small areas -- I believe that would make the cake sticky.
To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
Reply
To find "THE RECIPE LINKS ARE HERE" thread, click on "Forums", then "Recipes" and it's the first sticky. Latest updates are on (the bottom of) page 10 here: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-625803-135.html
Reply
post #13 of 27
are there other extracts that we can use besides lemon? Would peppermint work? or any others?
post #14 of 27
Can you taste the alcohol or extracts?
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairytale


I don't leave my container open so I'm lnot having the evaportion problem. I take s syringe, extract out lthe amount that I need, then put the cap back on the bottle.

I've never had a powdery texture so not sure what's happening. Could it be you are applying too much dust? I'll be interested to see other responses.



I take a small bowl (really small, like a finger bowl) and mix the dust and alcohol. When that didn't work, I use a small tupperware bowl with a plastic tight-fitting lid, which helped some, but not much.

As for the powdery texture, I always get that, no matter what alcohol I use. The only time I don't is on my gumpaste flowers when I steam them (not practical for a fondant cake). For gilding I switched to using an oil (veggie oil) and mixing with that. That works well, but it's only for very small areas -- I believe that would make the cake sticky.



I mix my dust in a painters pallet. It only holds about 2 teaspoons full. That's probably why I don't lose much. I also use the lemon extract so I suspect that's why I don't get that dusty residue. It mush have something to do with the oil.
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