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Do not line your pans with wax paper!! - Page 2

post #16 of 68
ceshell
I almost hate to say this but I have only had to rebake a cake one time and that was because I fell asleep before the timer went off and I slept for about 2 hours and it was a brick, it didn't have anything to do with no paper in the pan, I'm just not sure what happens that a cake has to be rebaked, can you explain? and no, I'm not boasting.
post #17 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

gscout73 I'm with you thumbs_up.gif
I've never lined my pans with wax or parchment paper in the 26 years I've been a cake decorator, it just seems like extra work and why do that to ourselves, even when I was a Wilton instructor I told my classes that Wilton recommended it but I personally did not do it.
All you decorators just try the bakers joy or the shortening/flour method and skip that paper step icon_smile.gif



Amen, sister! Heck, I just use spray Pam and be done with it. Except for cheesecakes - and for those I use buttered parchment because I use regular cake pans in a water bath. I hate springform pans!

Using waxed paper for baking just seems so...bizarre. Waxed paper is not made for baking - parchment is!

Weird. icon_confused.gif
~ Sherri
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~ Sherri
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post #18 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

'm just not sure what happens that a cake has to be rebaked, can you explain? and no, I'm not boasting.



Do you mean, why would you ever have to rebake? In this case it's just because I needed a full sized cake, and this layer bit the dust. Also the other layer cooked up really strange, the top and edges were hard. If I cut them off the cake would have been too small, so I just started over.

The rebaked cake seemed ok but one of the layers collapsed in a few spots after cooling. I did test it, it was thoroughly cooked, but it collapsed as though it had soft spots. Corners were hard

I think I just can't get the hang of this recipe, folding in the egg whites does not seem to be going well for me. As I mentioned, my oven issues are not helping.

The third cake was a round cake, would have had to make that one regardless of the unsuccessful first two - the cake I'm trying to bake is a 9" square under a 6" round.

For what it's worth I've never had this much trouble with a cake either!
post #19 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddyfl

ummm waxed paper has wax on it. wouldnt it melt and leave a waxy film on your food and pans? I only use parchment......I don't think you are supposed to bake with actual waxed paper, due to its waxiness....... Confused



Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Using waxed paper for baking just seems so...bizarre. Waxed paper is not made for baking - parchment is!

Weird. icon_confused.gif



You guys are so funny, it never occurred to me that people did not know that waxed paper is also meant for baking! I've used it for years. Although you are most correct in that parchment is better.

Here's a quote from Wikipedia:
"Oven: While wax paper is flammable, it can and is used safely in numerous baking applications. In baking quick breads or cakes, a pan can be lined with wax paper in such a way that the batter completely covers the surface of the wax paper lining. This prevents the bread or cake from sticking to the pan in the lined area, aiding in removal of the baked product."

And something I just read on baking911: "Waxed paper is essentially tissue paper that's been coated with paraffin on both sides, making it supposedly greaseproof and moisture proof. It eventually lets liquids soak through, tears easily, and the wax eventually starts to melt, unless it's completely covered and protected from the heat. For example, waxed paper isn't good for baking cookies because the exposed portions would smoke and char, but it's fine at the bottom of a batter-filled cake or brownie pan."
post #20 of 68
I sometimes use wax paper also and it's perfectly fine as a replacement for parchment. I don't have to spray/grease before or after I lay it down, usually just the sides.

http://www.answers.com/topic/wax-paper
post #21 of 68
ceshell
I'm really sorry you've had so much trouble with your oven, you mentioned that this is a rental house maybe you could get your landlord to replace the element in the oven, sounds like it may have hot/cold spots on it.
I've never had much success with scratch cakes, so I just stick to box mix and add a tablespoon of corn syrup per box and I cut down the water to one cup per box. Hope things work out better for you.
post #22 of 68
I ALWAYS use wax paper to line my pans..First I grease with butter then flour, and then lay the wax paper down. After baking, I let them cool for about 10 min. It always peels of just wonderful! And most of the time, All I have to do is just turn the pan upside down and tap it a little bit and out they pop! icon_biggrin.gif
Expecting our little munchkin around 12/22!!



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Expecting our little munchkin around 12/22!!



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post #23 of 68
I always line my pans with wax paper. I use the spray/flour combo and then put wax paper down and then pour the batter right in. I like using wax paper because it helps keep the top of my cake moist until I am ready to ice. Every little bit of help helps!! icon_rolleyes.gif

Parchment will do the same thing right? I actually just bought my first roll ever of parchment paper the other day for making scones and also thought maybe I can use them in my pans as well.


Amy
post #24 of 68
I am with everyone else I have used waxed paper and PAM and everything was fine. Sorry no help here!
post #25 of 68
I don't use any paper at all. I coat my pans with the recipe I got from CC (flour, oil, shortening) and have never had any problems.
post #26 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceshell

Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

'm just not sure what happens that a cake has to be rebaked, can you explain? and no, I'm not boasting.



Do you mean, why would you ever have to rebake? In this case it's just because I needed a full sized cake, and this layer bit the dust. Also the other layer cooked up really strange, the top and edges were hard. If I cut them off the cake would have been too small, so I just started over.

The rebaked cake seemed ok but one of the layers collapsed in a few spots after cooling. I did test it, it was thoroughly cooked, but it collapsed as though it had soft spots. Corners were hard

I think I just can't get the hang of this recipe, folding in the egg whites does not seem to be going well for me. As I mentioned, my oven issues are not helping.

The third cake was a round cake, would have had to make that one regardless of the unsuccessful first two - the cake I'm trying to bake is a 9" square under a 6" round.

For what it's worth I've never had this much trouble with a cake either!



I was having similar problems, since moving into this house. Some cakes would stick, some wouldn't, some would bake up too high, some wouldn't. It was never ending. I had never ever had a problem with cakes sticking, when I baked in my old house. I had always used pam + flour, or baker's joy. I've baked about 10 cakes in the last 3 days and not one of them has stuck. However! The first day my first cake turned out horribly.. I figured out why. My oven gets WAY too hot!

I went out and bought a thermometer specifically for ovens. I turned the oven on 300 degrees, and when it hit that mark, the thermometer read 351 (I checked it several times to see if it was steady or fluctuates, it was always 51 degrees hotter than it was supposed to be, no matter what temperature I set it on). So, every time after that first cake, I have baked my cakes at 275. Not one cake has stuck. They've all come out perfectly, and I've only used baker's joy in the pan.

Seriously, check your temperature. You might have to have someone come out and fix it for you, but for now, you can just bake at a lower temperature, and see if that helps.

Also, I have a baking stone on the bottom shelf, to regulate the heat, but I have had that there since I moved in 4 years ago. I knew there was an issue with the oven, and have always baked at a slightly lower temperature, but I had NO idea it was that bad. This is the first time I've had to bake a large cake in it, though. The little cakes weren't too bad. I guess because they cook faster, so they didn't have time to burn. All this time I thought it was my pans I had just bought. haha

I wish you the best of luck. If you're renting, the landlord should fix your oven for you, but until then, just lower the temperature by about 50 degrees, and see if that helps. icon_wink.gif


Hope this helps,

Holly
Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
~Albert Einstein~
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Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
~Albert Einstein~
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post #27 of 68
Thread Starter 
Thanks Holly! I really like your baking stone idea, I think I have one and may try it for the next cake. I do indeed have an oven thermometer and the oven is definitely not consistent in the way it heats. Sometimes it stops at the correct temperature, sometimes it just keeps going. The first cake I destroyed 2 months ago, I ran out and got the thermometer and discovered it was running 75 degrees too hot! icon_eek.gif But when I turned the temp down by 75 degrees, sometimes the oven just stayed at the "adjusted" temp (like 275). Clearly its internal thermostat is confused.

I do need to get the thing fixed. It's a 1960's antique Wedgewood stove, so no wonder I'm having issues. I thought I could overcome it by watching it as my cakes baked but clearly this is not working!

Hey, I like this idea - maybe it's not ME after all!! Who knows maybe I'll even try the wax paper again icon_wink.gif
post #28 of 68
When I baked cakes with my great-grandma (years ago) she would also grease the bottom of the pan, put the pre-cut piece of waxed paper in the pan, rubbed it thoroughly on the bottom pan and then flipped the waxed paper over. This way both sides of the waxed paper is coated in grease. Not once in all her years of baking did she ever have problems with this.
post #29 of 68
I"ve never lined any of my pans with wax paper or parchment. I only use the homemade cake release and I've never had any problems. I too think it is an extra step to line them.
"Let your legacy not be the stupid forgettable dandruff of life but that you LIVED. That you were here and that people remember YOU in all your wonderfulness. Not your stuff. Because stuff is forgettable." - - Jackie (a blog writer from Canada)
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"Let your legacy not be the stupid forgettable dandruff of life but that you LIVED. That you were here and that people remember YOU in all your wonderfulness. Not your stuff. Because stuff is forgettable." - - Jackie (a blog writer from Canada)
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post #30 of 68
I have never used waxed paper or parchment. I only lightly spray with generic Pam. I have baked 100s of cakes and have only had one stick. It was an Italian cream, very moist. It wasn't that bad and I was able to repair it.
Cake, glorious cake....is there anything better?
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Cake, glorious cake....is there anything better?
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