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Posts by hbquikcomjamesl

Speaking of wrinkles, the edible print for my Apollo Day cake didn't just rip; it wrinkled around the rip, where I was struggling to make it as inconspicuous as possible. As I said, yours turned out very well indeed (and now that I know you're doing it yourself, rather than farming it out, I guess you pretty much can have all the spares you need, on demand, which should make it a little less dicey for you than it is for me, if things start going wrong). One thought, if I...
It looks at least as successful as my "Leland Awards" cakes, or my "52 Pick-Up" cake from my birthday this year, and a good deal more successful than my 51st birthday cake, or the one I made for the 45th anniversary of the first Moon landing. And I'm sure you've already heard something to this effect, but it bears repeating, for the sake of food safety, whenever anybody first enters this realm (so don't feel like you're being singled out), particularly if they're doing it...
Depending on the exact type of edible printing media used, you may or may not need to chill it before peeling. Some materials (DecoPac's, for one) should most definitely be chilled in the freezer, while others (the stuff my current cake supply shop uses, for one) aren't significantly affected by being chilled. If it's your first time, it might be a good idea to have a spare edible print on hand, especially if it's the kind of media that doesn't become stiff when...
I agree wholeheartedly with you, "KellyKSD," on the "baby" cakes (are they "cellular peptide" cakes, "with mint frosting"?). That and "pregnant belly" cakes. Hell, I'm not exactly thrilled with putting an edible photograph of a person on a cake.   I wish I could find some instantly recognizable section of MacArthur Park, with trees (as in "old men playing checkers by . . . "), that's small enough to fit on top of an 8" square layer cake, at a large enough scale to have...
But not pure graphite. Graphite mixed with various binders and hardeners. Something I thought was common knowledge. But (as we all know from the small matter of Disco Dust), non-toxic doesn't necessarily mean "Good Eats." Decades ago, a magazine (I think it was Consumer Reports, but I may be mistaken) ran an article, with a title to the effect of "Lead in pencils, but not in the lead," concerning the use of lead paint on the outside of some pencils. Of course, in all...
I'm not a lawyer, and neither do I play one on television, but I read it as, "if you are under the $20k limit, commercial-grade equipment is not required; if you're over it, commercial-grade equipment is required." This particular snippet of statute seems to be silent on any other health code compliance issues for home bakers, and so I'm sure there must be other laws that apply.
I've been refrigerating cakes (and donuts, and both refrigerating and freezing bread) for decades, and never -- not once -- have any dried out because of the refrigeration. And we typically keep them well over a week -- the last pieces of my Apollo Day cake (baked around lunchtime on July 20th, the 45th anniversary of the first manned moon landing, and decorated that afternoon) tasted quite fresh and moist (albeit cold, but I like my cake chilled) just after midnight, the...
Here's the dilemma: I've now got a rough design for a MacArthur Park cake, but to get something recognizable with trees, grass, paths, and the edge of the lake, on an 8" square cake, I'd have to do it at a scale of about one inch to ten feet. That would make the protagonists of the song (not to mention the "old men playing checkers by the trees) TINY, about half an inch tall.   Am I thinking too much like a model railroader?
Hmm. In just about every Unwrapped I've ever seen, that involved casting any kind of candy, the molds were made of corn starch. That might be helpful here. Or not.
Somehow, I don't think you're going to find it.   The only reason why pure gold leaf is edible (albeit awfully expensive to be putting through your digestive system) is because gold is almost completely inert (and certainly about as bio-inert a metal as you're likely to find).   Rose gold is an alloy of (typically) 25% copper, 75% gold. Copper isn't so bio-inert.
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