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Posts by hbquikcomjamesl

Thanks, "mabeknot." As I said, there is a great deal I'll make from scratch, but I wouldn't want to even attempt to do so for something I don't eat myself. (BTW, I looked up my Chopped recipe: it was Kelvin Fernandez, in season 8, episode 5; he was allergic to "shellfish" [evidently meaning both mollusks and crustaceans]; was presented with two mollusks in the appetizer round, and a crustacean in the entree round; and ended up somehow making it to the dessert...
Uh, and why would you not insert food-safe metal (my favorite example being a skewer out of a turkey lacing kit) into a cake? And as to food-safe metal touching the cake or frosting, well, cake pans are usually made of metal, so you have metal touching the cake before it even makes it into the oven. And informal cakes are frequently served in-pan, so you end up, unless you're really neat with the frosting, with metal touching the frosting.   The key question is whether...
Yes. Just as the tool I use to mix frosting, beat eggs, and mix my turkey-loaf (i.e., a dinner fork) is powered by elbow grease. The few times I've participated in the baking of any kind of bread, other than from, say, Bridgford's frozen dough, (back when I was in elementary school! We churned our own butter, too.), it was all hand-kneaded.   I find myself thinking of something the printer at the Colonial Williamsburg print shop said, when I was there last month: he kept...
Ultimately, EVERYTHING amounts to "sacks of chemicals," INCLUDING everything that goes into a scratch recipe. And the bottom line for me is that while I've made gingerbread from scratch (it's so simple that there's no real point in bothering with a mix), and I've never used a mix for cookies (and have in fact reconstructed and reimagined a bar cookie mix that hasn't been seen on store shelves in over 35 years), and I might consider baking scratch cakes at some point, in...
Hmm. I use a handheld GE 5-speed for mixing cake and waffle batter (not with each other -- yet).   And I use an ordinary dinner fork for mixing cold-process buttercream (and cookie dough, and turkey loaf, and for beating eggs)
I haven't eaten chocolate myself since my age was a single digit, an allergist suspected chocolate as an aggravating factor in my allergies, and I found that the obvious path of least resistance (especially since Nestle's Quik had recently introduced a strawberry flavor) was to simply cultivate a loathing for the stuff.   That said, when I bake a chocolate cake (as I did this past Saturday evening, for my parents' 56th wedding anniversary), I use the DH "Swiss Chocolate"...
Reminds me of my own "wood display type" shortbreads for the Printing Museum: I made it absolutely clear that I would not be doing them again without lots and lots of help.
About 24 hours late, but: Submitted for your amusement, something I threw together out of odds and ends, for my parents' 56th anniversary. The naked section at the bottom is, as usual, in deference to my dad wanting to avoid frosting. DH "Swiss Chocolate" mix, with DH canned frosting, a spare edible print of a rose (leftover from my mother's birthday cake), and homemade cold process BC for the "56." As a companion piece, I made myself a kitchen cake, 8x8, from 2/3 of a DH...
I do note that there are several grades of denatured alcohol. "CD" grades are what used to be called "methylated spirit": spiked with methanol, they can get into you through unbroken skin, or through inhaling the vapor, and will attack the central nervous system. "SD" grades are denatured with much less toxic (but much more foul-tasting) additives, e.g., isopropanol, and are what you find in cosmetics and skin antiseptics (when you don't simply find straight...
I remember back in the 1970s, when Popular Science covered then-new waterjet cutting technology. One of the pictures showed how a waterjet cutter could cut out foam rubber insoles at so many "feet per minute" (their pun, and I'm sure it was intended).   And on the "keep hands away" part, no kidding! I'm reminded of something the docents say on the USS Hornet engine room tour (at the old Alameda Naval Base): the steam going to the turbines was under so much pressure that...
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