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Posts by Dayti

I would guess that they are different thicknesses - the expensive one being thicker, for things like edible images for cakes, the cheaper "O-grade" being thinner, for things like making wafer paper flowers, but the best thing would be to call them and ask. 
I would cover the top 1/2 - 2/3 approx of cake in the purple fondant. Add the frilly ruffle "underskirt" at the bottom. Make a strip of purple fondant that equals the circumference of the cake. Cut your scallops. Add to cake over the top of the frilly ruffles and use your fingers to create a bit of movement in the scallops. Put the beads on to hide the join. 
I think the slippery filling of the bottom tier, and a combination of a probably not level surface and rough driving, made the bottom tier shift - you can see the bottom tier is no longer centred on the board, the whole front part of the bottom tier has shunted forward, the cake has come apart under the fondant. Centre dowels give a false sense of security - the cake just ripped through it. Your straws may not have been placed correctly either. Is it on a thick cake drum...
Most of us use a thin cake board the same size as the cake since it gives you a good round shape/guide to ice your cake up against - most cakes shrink a little on baking so the 1/8" or 1/4" gap you get between the 6" cake and the 6" board would be filled with icing. You would then glue the board with the iced cake on onto the drum using royal icing, ganache, or a smear of buttercream. You can do the cake straight onto the drum if you want though. And I think a decorated...
I usually put all my 1 tier cakes on a cake drum that is 1 size larger than the cake itself. So a 6" cake would go on an 8" drum, which I would decorate in the same manner as the cake. In your photo, you have a rustic type buttercream, so I would do the same effect on the drum or at least ice it smooth. An ivory or white ribbon would be glued on the edge of the drum to hide the silver. This would travel in an 8" cake box, and when you get there simply remove the cake/drum...
I'm probably going to sound like a meanie, but why are you selling cakes, especially wedding cakes, if you don't even have a plain vanilla cake recipe down pat? I'm not surprised you are scared! I recommend you start with @FromScratchSF white cake recipe or google Liz Mareks cake recipes.
Yes you do.
You can also try doing it by embossing with a ruler or triangle held vertically, but your fondant needs to be quite thick.
Could you use whatever stick you usually use, or even a plain skewer, and put the straw around that stick and only insert it into the chocolate covering enough to make it glue into place? You would have to hace both stick and straw cut to the right length so no one knows the difference.
I would stack the 14 and 12, and take the others individually boxed and stack one by one at the venue. 3 tiers of heavy cake stacked together is a nightmare to try and maneuver easily and daintily to put on top of the other two at once.   Take a cake lifter or large spatula, extra icing, paper towel or whatever you smooth with, just in case you stick a finger in a cake by mistake. The thing with SPS is that you shouldn't mess up the icing by stacking them...you kind of...
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