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Posts by heartsnsync

I have been decorating cakes for 22 years and still often find myself in the middle of a cake design I had put together and say to myself, "What was I thinking???" LOL I do custom design and almost all my orders are composed of components I have never done before. Just practice and learn but make sure to give yourself plenty of time to get the new technique down before it's time to make it on a customer's cake. 
This can happen if you frost the cupcakes too soon after baking, if you frosting is too soft and the cakes are a recipe that gathers moisture on top after cooling, or if it is really hot and humid. The first two problems are easily fixed by waiting a bit or adjusting your recipe. The third problem can be solved by adjusting your butter cream recipe to one adjusted for high temperatures and humidity. HTH
It is very important to use a dam when doing a tiered cake with cream cheese icing. Cream cheese icing tends to be softer than other types of icing. Without a dam it tends to allow the cake layers to slide a bit and can cause you to have shifting in transport. I have been doing cakes for 22 years. Want to guess how I found this little bit of wisdom out? Just add a lot of extra powdered sugar to your cream cheese icing and make it really stiff and then put the smooth...
For smaller tiers I bake two layers and torte. For larger tiers (12" and larger), I bake four thinner cakes. For one, I don't have to worry about the cake not getting done in the middle. Two, it bakes evenly and faster. Three, it cools faster. Four, I have less issues with the larger cake breaking when torting and layering them. Just my way of doing it. I am sure others have their methods that work just as well for them, too.
The problem is the buttercream will be much heavier than the whipped cream and gravity will take effect and could cause you some major issues. Personally, I would not take the chance,
I roll my fondant out with corn starch (as many do with powdered sugar) so adding a mist of water to the crusted butter cream cake is a must for fondant to stick. I do it all the time with no issues. Just make sure to not add too much water and if you do, lightly dab some of it back off before putting on the fondant. It needs to just be a light mist. I use a food safe misting water bottle and spray it right on. I then wipe up and mist from off of the parchment paper that...
I  make a lot of cupcakes for different events including university galas, school concerts, and weddings. I have made 350, 500, and 900 cupcakes for a single events and over the past several months have literally made over 3,000 cupcakes. That being said, I have tried freezing cupcakes and have trouble with the wrappers wanting to stay firmly adhered once they start to thaw not to mention becoming misshapen if they are not frozen carefully. They also take up a lot of...
I make large cupcake orders quite often (just in the last few months have literally made over 3,000). I use the full sheet cake boxes for large orders. I place non-skid sheets under the cupcakes and make sure to pack them in so that there is only a little room between them. Once all are in the box then fold up the sides around them and place your top on your box. If your full sheet cake box bottoms are heavy durable corrugated cardboard then you can stack them up to...
If you are using real lace you would have to have it adhered to something clear that could also adhere to the butter cream. That could be tricky. Have you thought of making some Sugarveil lace? That is easy to apply and no problem with the underlying colored buttercream  showing. Below is a picture of a cake I did recently using the Sugarveil.
If you go directly onto the Sugarveil website they list some vendors. It is not readily available in very many places, which is a shame. I have been speaking with my local cake supply shop and showing her what the product is all about. Hopefully she wills start carrying it soon so it will make it easier for me to order.
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