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Posts by SJEmom

learned that lesson the hard way, but I have filed it away in my "what not to do" part of my brain.
Okay, that is what I did with my big cake. scraped off the soggy stuff and blotted dry, then globed on fresh frosting and it seems to be pretty good (with barely a crumb in it). Sounds like this cake should be fine.But, with my small cakes I frosted over the wet crumb coat while it was slightly crusted. Will those cakes slide off as the cake comes to room temperature? I guess I should potentially take those out first thing in the morning to let them come to temperature...
My children's birthday party is in 12 hours. I have made 3 cakes - an 11x15 and two 9" rounds. They were in the freezer up until a few hours ago when I moved them to the fridge to defrost. I made up BC frosting this afternoon and then put it in the fridge, covered until I was ready for them. At 6pm I took out the frosting in preparation to do a crumb coat. It was really thick from being in the fridge and so I added more milk to thin it out - as the frosting warmed up...
Thanks for all the tips/suggestions. It seems like there are many "right" way to do things! Since I was anxious to get making the cakes and getting them baking (and therefore did not get to read everyone's suggestions), I did the tilted pan thing. I am hoping that all the cakes turn out okay. I am fine if the division between the flavors isn't perfect, so we will see.Thanks again for all your help! I am learning so much about cake baking - and having fun, too!Karen
I plan to do just as you said with the 11x15 pan. I have done it before with success. That is good to know that it should work for the smaller pan, too. Do you know how much batter I would expect to put in for half of a 9" round (I am using a box mix)? For the 11x15 it takes two cake mixes, so it is easy to just do all of one mix and then the other.
For my childrens' birthdays I am making a single layer 11x15 cake (half chocolate/half yellow) for both, and then I am making two 9" rounds that will be their individual cakes (each kid gets a pan). They want them to be two flavors, too (and I need the extra cake mix for making cupcakes for a school party). What is the best way to do that? Try to pour half/half into the round pan? Or pour one flavor in first and pour the other flavor on top? Bake one pan yellow, one...
So, after discussions (and more discussions) with my kids, it seems that if I open up the idea of two cakes to them that it REALLY complicates things. Also, I don't think I am ready to do a multi-layered cake and couldn't figure out how that would add extra pieces - just make some taller than others. I think that I will make an 11x15 cake as the main cake that has happy birthday to both of them. Then to get my extra cake I will make two 9"rounds and decorate them as...
Oh, yeah, I was thinking two cakes!Originally it was going to be one HSM cake, but I thought that they might want separate cakes and DS mentioned a magic theme to go with the magic show that we will have at the party.So for the magic you think maybe draw a hat and have colorful stars coming out? I could probably do that.Other thoughts, ideas?
My kids are having a magic party. DS was thinking that he might like his cake to have a magic theme (DD wants a High School Musical theme). Any ideas? It has to be easy! Also, I would like to stick to bc frosting...not ready for fondant (although I can imagine a beautiful cake with fondant with this theme).
My DS's school requires that any baked items for birthday celebrations be nut free and accommodate any other allergies in the classroom. DS has a child with a dairy allergy. Also, things need to be baked at school. The school recommends the allergy friendly cake mixes.My DS wants to make rainbow cake - a basic white cake that kids then mix small amounts of batter with food coloring and it all gets poured into a pan to be a rainbow colored cake. The cake needs to be...
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