Sunflowerbagel Posted 6 Feb 2007 , 11:22pm
post #1 of

I've been asked to duplicate a friend's wedding cake from 5 years ago (a miniature version for their anniversary). She said it was an "Orange Butter" cake with grand marnier filling. The good news is she and her husband only had a bite on their wedding day so I'm sure if I came up with something really close, they wouldn't care icon_wink.gif

Anyone have a recipe similar to this they'd be willing to share? I searched the forum and couldn't find something orange and buttery...

Thanks!
K

45 replies
JodieF Posted 6 Feb 2007 , 11:28pm
post #2 of

This was my wedding cake......orange buttermilk....but I'm sure you could find a Grand Marnier filling...

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/108257

calvarykari Posted 6 Feb 2007 , 11:28pm
post #3 of

What about the dreamcycle cake and use the grand marnier for flavoring in the icing?

Sunflowerbagel Posted 19 Feb 2007 , 6:26pm
post #4 of

I'm SO silly and didn't check "watch this topic", so I just now saw the replies. icon_redface.gif Sorry.

I found out some more information and it's actually a butter cake with a "hint of orange zest". I'm not too concerned with the cake now.

But - HERE'S WHERE I NEED HELP -- It has "fresh Apricot Grand Marnier Filling". I've never done any fillings with alcohol, so if anyone has a recipe or something I can tweek to create this filling, I'd appreciate it.

Thanks!!
K

ShirleyW Posted 19 Feb 2007 , 8:37pm
post #5 of

This filling recipe sounds pretty good, and you could add a splash of Grand Mariner and some orange zest as well to perk it up. Unless it is a summer cake, because I think this filling might break down in heat.
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/apricot-filling-and-frosting-for-angel-food-cakes/detail.aspx

Sunflowerbagel Posted 19 Feb 2007 , 9:25pm
post #6 of

Thanks, I'll give it a try. icon_smile.gif

snarkybaker Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 4:11am
post #7 of

Is she from another country by chance ? Butter cake is a chiffon type cake. Most American cakes that aren't pound cakes would be " butter cake", Please note this mean no cake mix plus extender, pudding, etc., as those are all too dense. A bit of orange juice and zest would make it a "orange butter cake".

I would make a pastry cream enriched with Grand Marnier for the filling.

Here is a discussion of butter cakes at the Joy of Baking.

http://www.joyofbaking.com/ButterCakes.html

And here is a recipe:

http://www.joyofbaking.com/YellowButterCake.html

Sunflowerbagel Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 1:25pm
post #8 of

No, she isn't from another country. It's the cake she chose from her cake person's website in Tucson (she's in Texas now).

Thanks for all your help!! This is great. Her description of the cake says, "Less is better with this yellow butter cake. This super light and luscious cake melts in your mouth, with a hint of orange zest... Our most popular selection for a brunch or outdoor wedding. Simplicity and elegance... a tasteful choice!"

It looks like you led me to this exact cake recipe. icon_biggrin.gif

I will look into the pastry cream option too.
Thanks again!

CarolAnn Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 1:50pm
post #9 of

I have a couple questions. First what is pastry cream? A type of cake? Then, exactly what is Grand Marnier? I read something here about it last week and went to the liquor store to read the label. That didn't really tell me anything and the guy working there didn't know either. Then there's chocolate liquor (sp)? I figured that was a liquor with chocolate in it for flavor. I browsed a neat book on chocolate at Borders Bookstore Saturday that said chocolate liquor had nothing to do with alcohol. The book had wonderful chocolate goodies in it, oh man, and very interesting, about where chocolate comes from. Sure surprised me!

kidscakelady Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 1:57pm

I use chocolate liquer all the time with my triple chocolate fudge cake scraps to make cake balls and then coat them in dark chocolate. I f you like chocolate... these are delicious!!!!

CarolAnn Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:03pm

So IS it alcoholic?

Teekakes Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:06pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn

I have a couple questions. First what is pastry cream? A type of cake? Then, exactly what is Grand Marnier? I read something here about it last week and went to the liquor store to read the label. That didn't really tell me anything and the guy working there didn't know either. Then there's chocolate liquor (sp)? I figured that was a liquor with chocolate in it for flavor. I browsed a neat book on chocolate at Borders Bookstore Saturday that said chocolate liquor had nothing to do with alcohol. The book had wonderful chocolate goodies in it, oh man, and very interesting, about where chocolate comes from. Sure surprised me!




Grand Marnier is an Orange Liquer. Very good stuff too! Pastry cream is the white creamy fluffy filling you will find in cream puffs and a few other pastries at your local bakeries. There are quit a few recipes out there for it, none of them difficult to make and use.
icon_smile.gif

Teekakes Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:08pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn

So IS it alcoholic?




Yes, it is alcoholic............smooth kind though. Nothing like whiskey, bourbon, etc.........it is a sweet orangy smooth drink that can be mixed or drank by itself. icon_smile.gif

mgdqueen Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:10pm

OMG that sounds DELICIOUS!!! I'm not a cake lover, but the combination of orange and apricot intrigues me! I think I'm going to have to try it!

sliceofheaven Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:11pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn

I have a couple questions. First what is pastry cream? A type of cake? Then, exactly what is Grand Marnier? I read something here about it last week and went to the liquor store to read the label. That didn't really tell me anything and the guy working there didn't know either. Then there's chocolate liquor (sp)? I figured that was a liquor with chocolate in it for flavor. I browsed a neat book on chocolate at Borders Bookstore Saturday that said chocolate liquor had nothing to do with alcohol. The book had wonderful chocolate goodies in it, oh man, and very interesting, about where chocolate comes from. Sure surprised me!


Pastry cream is (basically) a fancy word for custard. It is made with milk, eggs, sugar, endless flavorings, etc. It is DELICIOUS and a FANTASTIC filling for cakes! can also be used in crepes, as a dip for fruit, etc. thumbs_up.gif Grande Marnier is an orange flavored liqueur. It gives a great depth of flavor to most everything..mix a couple tbls. in cake batter, fillings, frostings, etc..AMAZING with anything Chocolate icon_razz.gificon_razz.gifthumbs_up.gif

Teekakes Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:13pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by JodieF

This was my wedding cake......orange buttermilk....but I'm sure you could find a Grand Marnier filling...

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/108257




JodieF.................thanks for posting this recipe of your wedding cake. The Orange Buttermilk Cake sounds wonderfully delicous! I just printed it out and will be trying it for the next family cake. icon_smile.gif

snarkybaker Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:30pm

For an apricot filling, this almost certainly means a curd-type filling enriched with Grand Marnier

http://thefoody.com/preserves/apricotcurd.html

Here is one recipe. I love curds for filling cakes. I would also suggest that to this recipe you add 3 T. of Grand Marnier at the end of cooking. I would also set the filling with 2 sheets of softened gelatin so it doesn't make the sides of the cake bulge.

Teekakes Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:46pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by txkat

For an apricot filling, this almost certainly means a curd-type filling enriched with Grand Marnier

http://thefoody.com/preserves/apricotcurd.html

Here is one recipe. I love curds for filling cakes. I would also suggest that to this recipe you add 3 T. of Grand Marnier at the end of cooking. I would also set the filling with 2 sheets of softened gelatin so it doesn't make the sides of the cake bulge.




This sounds pretty good. Is what they call caster sugar just our granulated sugar?

Michelle104 Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 2:49pm

Ok guys! Really dumb question!!!.....when you add any kind of liquour to your recipes, does the alcohol cook out and just the flavor remain...or is there still alcohol in it? If you do use this in any recipes do you feel the need to inform people? TIA

Teekakes Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 3:01pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michelle104

Ok guys! Really dumb question!!!.....when you add any kind of liquour to your recipes, does the alcohol cook out and just the flavor remain...or is there still alcohol in it? If you do use this in any recipes do you feel the need to inform people? TIA




It depends on when you add the alcohol into the recipe and what kind of recipe it is. In the case of frostings the alcohol is not cooked out, only stirred in so the alcohol content remains. In the case of making Bananas Foster the alcohol is burned off before being served.

Anytime I have made frostings with alcohol I let it be known. Keep in mind the alcohol content is very very little per serving so there is little cause for concern. icon_smile.gif

Michelle104 Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 3:17pm

Thanks Teekakes! So when you add it to the batter? Cooks out ?

Teekakes Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 3:37pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michelle104

Thanks Teekakes! So when you add it to the batter? Cooks out ?




Yes, in your cake itself there will be only tiny trace amounts of alcohol. You will have great flavor though! I love baking with the chocolate and flavored liquors! Someone above said how wonderful chocolate and grand marnier is together and let me tell you, that person is correct! Frangelica is another wonderful liquor to bake with.

Narie Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 3:38pm

http://food.cookinglight.com/cooking/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=522803

I would replace some of the orange juice with Grand Marnier, perhaps 1/4 cup. There is also a orange cake recipe that is supposed to go with it.

Michelle104 Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 3:43pm

Hey teekakes~ Have you ever cooked with Amarula? That is my FAV!!! My DH "invented" a drink that I call "Mommy Chocolate Milk" YUMMMYYYY!! I don't know exactly how he makes it but it has milk and coffee and choc syrup in with the Amarula and puts it all in a shaker with ice! MMMMMMM!!

Teekakes Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 3:46pm

Thanks, Narie. I just printed it out to use with the other Orange Buttermilk cake. This recipe the alcohol will cook out of because the filling is cooked so no worries here. icon_smile.gif

Teekakes Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 3:49pm

Hi Michelle......I have not heard of Amarula. I do know what Amaretto is and I use it in cooking as well. It too makes a wonderfully delicious drink, very much like the one you are talking about. What is Amarula?
Not being much of a drinker I am more familiar with the liquors that are commonly used in cooking. A nice drink now and then is good though. icon_smile.gif

snarkybaker Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 4:02pm

Amarula is yummy. It is a Bailey's like liqueur made from the Amarula fruit which to me is sort of Guava like.

And most cooking liqueurs contain less alcohol than Vanilla ( or other) extract. Vanilla is 70 proof. Good vanilla is 80 proof. If you'd use vanilla, yu can use booze. icon_wink.gif

chaptlps Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 4:31pm

K have any of you ever had tiramisu? That delightful italian dessert made with lady fingers, coffee syrup and gran marnier flavored zabaglione (fancy word for italian style pastry cream). Here is a link to the recipe for tiramisu, you could use the filling recipe on there for your filling. And yes it takes quite a bit of liquor (6 oz) but the alcohol is cooked out of it when you are making your zabaglione. I put strawberries in the leftovers, and it was very good. It has a distinctive orange floral aroma and flavor.
The recipes on this site use weight instead of volume for the ingredients. so I would go n get a scale from the local wallymart. (I got a really nice digital one for like 30 bucks there). They have the regular ones for like 10 and under.
here's the link to the recipe.
http://pastrychef.com/htmlpages/recipes/tiramisu.html
One more thing, I can't find mascarpone cheese round here to save my life so I subbed ricotta (blended til smooth) for the mascarpone. You could also sub it with drained plain yoghurt or blend cottage cheese till smooth.
Beings this recipe is based on weight halving it would be quite easy.

CarolAnn Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 4:42pm

txkat, What do you mean by this?

Quote:
Quote:

I would also set the filling with 2 sheets of softened gelatin so it doesn't make the sides of the cake bulge.


I have never used unflavored gelatin. This filling is something I AM going to try. I've heard Godiva choc liquer is the best. Other opinions?

I may stock up in one trip to the liquor store, I only use it for baking -so far.... I found out this morning my mil might be getting out of rehab (she had knee replacement) this Thursday. I thought she'd be there another couple of weeks. She's coming to stay with us until she can go home. I'm not sure I'm ready for this..... She's a dear and it'll be okay, but I am really feeling overwhelmed suddenly. Oh well... pray for me please.

snarkybaker Posted 20 Feb 2007 , 4:59pm

In pastry work, we set a lot of mousses, creams etc..with just a touch of gelatin. It helps stabilize it for molding.

http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/pDetail.asp?p=312

Here is a link to the type of gelatin sheets most pastry chefs use. We use them because they are fast and have no risk of grainy gelatin clumps.

You can use know unflavored gelatin form the store, at a rate of about 1/2t.per gelatin sheet. Just make sure you soften it first, and add it to the curd mixture while it is still hot.

This little trick will allow your cakes to sit out much longer at room temperature without filling ooze.

If you are making a trip to the liquor store for baking supplies, I would suggest the following as a good starter kit.

Grand Marnier or Grand Gala ( Grand Gala is cheaper, and I actually prefer it for some things)

Amaretto

Kaluha or Tia Maria ( I prefer Tia Maria. Kaluha tastes muddy to me)

these are the most versatile liquors. Then, let your imagination run wild.

I use a lot of chambord ( raspberry), godiva ( chocolate), and buckets of cointreau ( seville orange). My current favorite is Alize, which is passionfruit.

An abosolutely wonderful new product is a vanilla infused cognac by the people who make Grand Marnier. I use it in Vanilla Cognac cake which is my absolute favorite yellow cake.


Don't overspend all at once. Pick one or two that you know you'll use and go from there.

Our prayers are with you having MIL with you. maybe you could teach her to ice cupcakes and keep her busy


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