adven68 Posted 1 Oct 2005 , 10:31pm

Hi guys...I made cake balls for the first time....(yummy stuff!) But I thought I would use some milk chocolate Easter bunnies I had in the freezer to cover them with. So I chopped them up, put them in a double boiler to melt but then never became liquidy....just a gritty, dry soft blob. I ended up adding a little butter which did nothing....and then I added some heavy cream.....It loosened it up but the texture was so bad. I dipped the balls in there and then covered them with sprinkles to hide my embarrassing clumps!

Is this chocolate not suitable for some reason? Did I melt it the wrong way? Someone please enlighten me!

Thanks in advance!

6 replies
SugarCreations Posted 1 Oct 2005 , 11:13pm

I am no chocolate expert. But you proably should have let them come to room temperature before trying to melt them.

ThePastryDiva Posted 1 Oct 2005 , 11:19pm

it depends on what kind of chocolate you used...sometimes it takes a long while to get your chocolate to melt.

I was working in an 80 degree kitchen today trying to melt milk chocolate to 104 degrees F...( to temper it)

I was using real chocoalte pistols..(makes you think of the discs you get from wilton)...It just seemed to be holding it's shape and not melt while the termometer was getting higher and higher.

So, I kept taking the chocolate off the double boiler and kept stiring it...it took a LOOOONG time to melt, putting it back and forth..

I eventually got it to melt, but it was just looking like a mess.

SO, if there was nothing wrong with your chocolate and if it was REAL chocolate...maybe you just needed a little patience to get it going....?

Or....maybe it got water in your chocolate, that has been known to happen..(condensation from being frozen?)...too many variables to really tell....

alimonkey Posted 1 Oct 2005 , 11:26pm

It certainly sounds like it seized. You may have gotten a little of the moisture from the double boiler into the chocolate (especially if the water was at a full boil), or as CakeRookie suggested, the moisture may have come from the cold chocolate as it thawed. If a little added fat won't save it, nothing will. This will usually happen if you're melting it with nothing in it. If you add a little cream or butter at the beginning it can usually be prevented.

Ali

adven68 Posted 2 Oct 2005 , 12:08am

Thanks so much....I really do learn something new here everyday!

candyladyhelen Posted 2 Oct 2005 , 7:03pm

Having chocolate around water is always risky. You could melt it in the microwave for like 20 seconds each time til melted. Also, as stated, let it get to room temp. first. You can add crisco type shortening or even a little veg. oil to it to stir in.

aunt-judy Posted 4 Oct 2005 , 8:43pm

indeed, moisture is the enemy of chocolate. frozen chocolate will almost always have some condensation, and even thawed and patted dry, there will likely be sufficient moisture to seize the chocolate when heated (the moisture causes the solids and fats to "disagree" and separate from each other, which results in that grainy texture you described). as candyladyhelen pointed out, shortening will help a little, as it helps "emulisfy" the elements of the chocolate, including any visible or occult moisture.

to avoid the steam problem, i like to melt chocolate in the microwave at 50% power. a few ounces will take about 2 minutes, at which point you stir to melt completely. if you're using it coat anything, then you can make your own "coating chocolate" (like merkins) by using about 1 tbsp of shortening melted with each cup (about 6 ounces) of chocolate in the microwave, and stir to combine. icon_smile.gif

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