Torting Sheet Cakes

Decorating By terabera69 Updated 3 Aug 2008 , 7:10pm by Ruby2uesday

terabera69 Posted 29 Jan 2007 , 2:55pm
post #1 of 16

I forgot to add this to my last question. When torting a sheet cake, what is the best way to place the top layer back on without it breaking in half?

15 replies
GrannieJ Posted 29 Jan 2007 , 3:15pm
post #2 of 16

I slide the top onto a cake board and pop it in the freezer for awhile it firm it up. Then I just slide the top back on.

indydebi Posted 29 Jan 2007 , 3:19pm
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrannieJ

I slide the top onto a cake board and pop it in the freezer for awhile it firm it up. Then I just slide the top back on.




Agree. This works PERFECT!!! For large round cakes, too.

rhopar33 Posted 29 Jan 2007 , 3:19pm
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrannieJ

I slide the top onto a cake board and pop it in the freezer for awhile it firm it up. Then I just slide the top back on.




That's good to know because I've alwyas had trouble with the tops breaking!

Bettycrockermommy Posted 29 Jan 2007 , 4:38pm
post #5 of 16

I am going to try this next time. Thanks for the tip!

2sdae Posted 29 Jan 2007 , 4:54pm
post #6 of 16

I would deff use the cake board trick, I just did a 12x16x3 in double layer sheet cake and that is what I did to it. I torted each cake and it was easier than I expected to place the tops back without breaking or damaging them.

moejoe Posted 29 Jan 2007 , 5:00pm
post #7 of 16

When I torte my cakes I put them in the frig for a while befoe I fill them and frost them.

GrannieJ Posted 29 Jan 2007 , 5:09pm
post #8 of 16

I also cover my cake board with platic wrap so it slides off easier. I have even done this with 1/2 sheet cakes.

Valli_War Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 10:59am
post #9 of 16

I have never torted a sheet cake before. I have wilton's small leveler, nothing to tort bigger than 10" cake. I have to tort a 11 X 15 cake this week. If I want to pop the top layer in the freezer to firm up, do I cover it with saran wrap and then do it or can I just leave it on the cake board without covering to freeze. Also, how long do you think it'll take to freeze hard so that I can put it back on the filling without breaking?

TIA,

tomatoqeen Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 6:54pm
post #10 of 16

I have torted many sheet cakes, actually I've only NOT torted 5 10x15 cakes. I guess I'm not too quick, but I got tired of ruining cardboard cake boards with crumbs due to the moistness of the cakes. So, I bought a cookie sheet that is very thin with no sides or lip on three sides. I bought it at Michaels with a 50% off coupon -- only cost me $10.00-- and it is 12x18. More than enough space for any of my torted layers. Torte, slide it onto the cookie sheet, and pop it into the freezer to firm up and no more cracked tops!! Easy clean up plus I don't have to waste so much plastic -- saves $$ and the earth!!

1BAKED453 Posted 27 Jul 2008 , 11:26pm
post #11 of 16

TOMATOQUEEN I'M GONNA TRY YOUR METHOD NEXT TIME.

Valli_War Posted 3 Aug 2008 , 2:01pm
post #12 of 16

Thanks to Tomatoqueen. I went and bought the biggest cookie sheet they have without the lip and used it to tort the 11 X15 sheet cake. No problems with breaking or anything. I have a wilton small leveler, don't have anything big. I thought I'll share how I torted this cake. I use the small one to make a slit on all corners and then took the floss and slid it through all four corners' slits and pulled it. Since I don't make any money out of this hobby, I cannot justify buying agbay and everyone here said wilton's big leveler is not good.

Thanks to everyone who helped me make this cake.

tomatoqeen Posted 3 Aug 2008 , 5:12pm
post #13 of 16

You're welcome!! Glad it worked for you!! Never personally tried the floss...I have the large Wilton leveler. It's not great, but it works for me...hobbyist.

kathyw Posted 3 Aug 2008 , 6:36pm
post #14 of 16

Thanks for the tip.
This may be a dumb question but when you torte, are you splitting a 2" layer or a 3" layer? How high is the cake supposed to be when finished? Thanks.

Valli_War Posted 3 Aug 2008 , 6:41pm
post #15 of 16

Usually it is 2 inches each layer. I was making a sheet cake and I couldn't use two layers of 2 " each since it would be for too many people and I needed this size to make the design on the cake. So, I torted a 2" cake just to fill it with very thin layer of filling (to make it tasty). It didn't increase the height too much. It was totally 2 1/4" with the frosting on the top. Usually sheet cakes are 2" high.

Ruby2uesday Posted 3 Aug 2008 , 7:10pm
post #16 of 16

Oh thanks for the tips!!! i was having a coronary the last time i had to torte a big round.

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