Need Royal Icing To Drip Down Cake Asap

Decorating By SweetyGirl Updated 8 Jun 2016 , 2:38am by SweetyGirl

SweetyGirl Posted 7 Jun 2016 , 1:18am
post #1 of 7

I am thinking using tinted, thin royal icing to achieve the drips on the cake pictured below.  Does anyone have any idea how thin/thick I should make the icing for it to still drip yet harden to the cake.  Plus, how should I apply it?

From Pinterest:


6 replies
toshascc Posted 7 Jun 2016 , 4:00am
post #2 of 7

i know you said royal icing, but if it helps i melt white chocolate with a table spoon of coconut oil. it hardens really well and tastes amazing.

Pastrybaglady Posted 7 Jun 2016 , 5:19am
post #3 of 7

I would go for the thickness a little thinner than school glue and apply with a pastry bag and small round tip.

hippiecac Posted 7 Jun 2016 , 1:40pm
post #4 of 7

I've made quite a few drip cakes and have done them all with ganache.

You can either use liquid candy coloring  or use your regular liquid gel colorings + Flo-Coat to tint white ganache.

I let it sit until warm room temperature; the viscosity is similar to honey.

To create the drips I use tipless piping bags -it's easier to control where you put the ganache + no tips to wash. You just cut off a tiny bit of the end of the bag and  you're ready to go. 

There are tons of tutorials on line - Katherine Sabbath is the queen of the drip cake!!!

maybenot Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 1:09am
post #5 of 7

I have to agree that some form of chocolate/candy melts/ganache is your best bet.

SoniaMT Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 2:23am
post #6 of 7

I also have used ganache for the dripping effect, however im sure royal icing would work just as well. I dont think there is a specific recipe to how much water to add, you would just have to check the consistency. THat looks like a fun cake to decorate! =) Best of luck! 

SweetyGirl Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 2:38am
post #7 of 7

Thanks all!!  I am going to cover a cake dummy and play with some royal icing to see how it goes.  Wish me luck!!

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