How To Make This Dinosaur!! Help!

Decorating By yjflores1 Updated 12 Jun 2016 , 9:00pm by carolinecakes

yjflores1 Posted 3 Jun 2016 , 6:40am
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Hey guys I was asked to make a cake with a big dinosaur next to the it! I have never made anything like this before ! I know molding chocolate, fondant and Rice Krispies is an option. How long do these things normally take to make? Which one is more convenient? How far in advance can I make it? Most importantly how the heck do you make it?? 900_how-to-make-this-dinosaur_983606575126553525e.jpg

32 replies
640Cake Posted 3 Jun 2016 , 1:35pm
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I'd shape it out of RKT first and then cover in modeling chocolate. And I'd probably start it a week before, but would probably be fine to start even earlier.

yjflores1 Posted 3 Jun 2016 , 6:48pm
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Ok should I make the RKT or will it work with already made RKT? How should I store it so it doesn't go bad? Thank you for your input!

640Cake Posted 3 Jun 2016 , 8:00pm
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I've never used the store bought kind, but I would assume they would be okay?  I like to make my own because I like to grind up the rice cereal a bit, so they come out smoother - less bumps, but the chocolate (or fondant) will help cover any bumps anyway.  I store my figures in a cake box - not an airtight container - just keep light and dust away.

yjflores1 Posted 4 Jun 2016 , 3:40am
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Ok thank you so much !!! :)

-K8memphis Posted 5 Jun 2016 , 5:34pm
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if i made that i would support it internally -- just imagine piping/dowelling from his tail to his head and then an offshoot for that leg and maybe the neck -- all of it is gonna be taking stress -- if it was just sitting there it might be different

yjflores1 Posted 6 Jun 2016 , 4:47am
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What should I use to support its shape? a wooden dowel?

-K8memphis Posted 6 Jun 2016 , 4:46pm
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yes or plastic

yjflores1 Posted 7 Jun 2016 , 3:53am
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Ok thank you :)

-K8memphis Posted 7 Jun 2016 , 12:11pm
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but i would connect them like a skeleton like i might use plastic bendy straws and insert pointy bamboo skewers into either end or something -- yeah so each skewer pierces the straw for a bit of stability see what i mean --

i haven't done this exactly it's just my  thoughts here as to how i would first proceed

-K8memphis Posted 7 Jun 2016 , 12:26pm
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--picture yourself placing it on there and it breaking versus placing it on there with proper support so it can't break anywhere it just needs to be reinforced there see how all of it takes stress --

and it could get good support in the mouth there too where the green stuff comes out

cakebaby2 Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 7:57am
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Just out of interest is this for a paying client or a gift for a friend? You're very  brave to take on a paying job you don't know how to do if the former..and still brave if the latter x

-K8memphis Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 11:43am
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millions of cakers take on jobs they don't exactly know how to do or have no earthly idea how to do or have never  done before and if they say they say otherwise they are fibbing

how often do you suppose bronwen weber got an order for a 9 foot oil derrick spewing chocolate -- 

in the cake world there's 10,000 first times then 10,000 more  -- if one does only what one already knew how to do there would be no cake world --














cakebaby2 Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 7:18pm
post #14 of 33


Quote by @-K8memphis on 7 hours ago

millions of cakers take on jobs they don't exactly know how to do or have no earthly idea how to do or have never  done before and if they say they say otherwise they are fibbing

how often do you suppose bronwen weber got an order for a 9 foot oil derrick spewing chocolate -- 

in the cake world there's 10,000 first times then 10,000 more  -- if one does only what one already knew how to do there would be no cake world -



Probably very true- K8 though I doubt they agree to an order with no clue whatsoever if they are a pro, hence my question if it was a gift or an order by some unsuspecting client.

I also doubt the lady you mention , or indeed anyone like her came on to a forum (especially this recently resurrected venue) without 1 clue, not 1, as to how it could be achieved. If its for a friend as a gift there is no shame in hobbyists picking what's left of the professionals brains. 















-K8memphis Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 7:43pm
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i've worked in many bakeries and yes they routinely take on orders cluelessly -- it's a creative personalized field -- most every cake is different, special -- the oil derrick is a great example -- she charged many thousands for that and she had to figure it out completely --

 i don't know what shame there is to any of it -- if she's got a paying order it's a shame for her to come here & ask for and get my help? but if it's for a friend it's not a shame? i don't know what that really means --

"unsuspecting client' what are you talking about -- why are you saying these things -- this doesn't seem acceptable to you for some reason -- how is it your concern either way --

i'm glad there was no internet when i was a little newbie -- i did everything 'wrong' and 'shameful' according to the wise standard setting cake people -- and i just laugh -- i would never have known that many of the things i've done were impossible stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes.png

-K8memphis Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 7:45pm
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besides, she had three clues:

"I know molding chocolate, fondant and Rice Krispies is an option."


-K8memphis Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 7:50pm
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and the forum was off line in march of 2015 for a few weeks but i've been posting on here non-stop way before and ever since -- 

-K8memphis Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 7:53pm
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oh by unsuspecting you must mean that the client would not realize how much behind the scenes work the op or any of us cakers put in for for their creation -- yes many many hours of work can go into a cake before the first egg gets cracked and the mixer whirls to life

is that what you mean?

yjflores1 Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 7:56pm
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I have time to mold this and practice before delivering the final product I take a lot of pride in my work and of course I wouldn't give someone something I knew was not done well thank you all for your feedback ! bowtie.png

cakebaby2 Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 8:20pm
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Quote by @-K8memphis on 8 minutes ago

oh by unsuspecting you must mean that the client would not realize how much behind the scenes work the op or any of us cakers put in for for their creation -- yes many many hours of work can go into a cake before the first egg gets cracked and the mixer whirls to life

is that what you mean?


I sense you're kind of annoyed by my question, I'm a hobby baker don't sell cakes but I've been a customer for custom cakes on many occasions. This site has opened my eyes  and I think you maybe have to consider it from the other side occasionally K8 as a customer?

This is NOT directed at the OP but you actually . Long a champion of the price questioners and "how do I's" you appear to have little regard for the unsuspecting..yes unsuspecting, customer handing over their hard earned cash to what they think are professional people who will create a custom cake for their celebration.

I have zero sympathy for the cheapskates who trawl FB looking for cheap cakes..they get what they deserve.

 There IS no shame in a hobbyist seeking advice, I must admit I don't like it when I see a question on here about how to do basics when someone has already taken an order and no doubt assured the client its no problem?

The really annoying thing is that they come here to do it and take advice, no doubt well intentioned from people they don't know or can scrutinize THEIR work to see if the advice will fly?

Fine for a hobbyist, I expect my pro's to pay for tutorials, buy books in other words learn their craft, which I ultimately as a customer pay them fo?. OP I'm sorry if I offended you but K8 jumping in to

cakebaby2 Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 8:23pm
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don't know what happened there? I meant to say K8 annoyed me by jumping on me after I asked a question.


-K8memphis Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 10:42pm
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yjflores1 -- if you are making the rkt -- I use one less cup of rk than the recipe calls for -- 5c rk, 1/4 c butter, 10 - 16 oz marshmallows, some vanilla --

I get best results by melting the marshmallows on a low heat for a longer time not cooking them -- then I hold them over hot water so I have time to mold them --

I let mine set up overnight so the gelatin in the mm cures -- before trying to trim completely -- I use a microplane to smooth --

hope you can post a picture -- best to you


pinkvelvet Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 10:55pm
post #23 of 33

900_how-to-make-this-dinosaur_8500455758a26ae70bf.jpgI made this cake for my grandson's 4 th birthday. The dinosaur is made with RKT's and covered in modeling chocolate. I made the dinosaur a week before and then placed him on the cake with the other details. I used large plastic dowels and smaller wooden ones. He dinosaur sunk back on its hind legs abit due to lack of enough structure. This was my first modeled figure, I learned f you have a good strong structure , it would have been easier and would have gotten a better result. Good luck to you.

carolinecakes Posted 8 Jun 2016 , 11:13pm
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This link shows you how to build a figure ( not a dinosaur) onto a wire frame, RKT/ FONDANT can be heavy, I would want the dinosaur to support itself, and not risk it crushing the cake kwim. I recently built a gum paste cross topper on a wire frame, I use what I had on hand, 18 gauge  floral wire doubled and wrapped with floral paper. It was very sturdy. Just a thought, in case you don't want to use the wire in the tutorial. It's like what K8 said, think wire skeleton. HTH


http://cakesdecor.com/entries/437

MBalaska Posted 9 Jun 2016 , 12:52am
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http://rosebakes.com/biggest-cake-failure/

this is the other side of the story.....making stuff that you don't know how to make for a customer without practice first.  Rose is a good decorator, no great decorator.


-K8memphis Posted 9 Jun 2016 , 2:09am
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that is a beautiful story, MB, thanks

woozy Posted 12 Jun 2016 , 8:06pm
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Here's my boy from last week. IT WAS (pretty) EASY!

If you support the body well, the RCT should be a breeze. 

My tips:

I made RCT with no butter. I left the cereal regular size, lumpy is good. I made it a week ahead and boxed it. Every bite got eaten, and the little monsters begged for fangs and eyeballs.

I covered with MMF, it's much less expensive and worked great. I made thin, messy strips and smoothed with fingers. Dinos' had rough skin. My MMF is bright green. Then I used a brush to apply Spruce Green Color Dust. I used a round piping tip and smacked him all over to make scales. The lighter green showed through the indentions, and looked great. 

He needs those bones over his eyes to be distinct so the eyes can face forward. I made fondant rolls and put the "triangles" in them with a sharp cookie cutter. The light green showing thru was awesome.  Google images of dinosaurs is your friend for the anatomy.

I made candy clay teeth, but fonadat would work if you left PLENTY of drying time.


Good luck, my guy was fun and inexpensive.

900_how-to-make-this-dinosaur_890930575dc0b7dac0d.jpg

-K8memphis Posted 12 Jun 2016 , 8:11pm
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nice, woozy -- so well done --  about how big is it?

woozy Posted 12 Jun 2016 , 8:19pm
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The head covered the top of the  8" square top layer. HUGE!

I didn't have to make a body, but his shrimpy arms were breaking out of the sides of the cake. Of course, his head was heavy, but a cut cake-board and 4 lollipop sticks supported it well. 


I'm an amateur. (wink)

yjflores1 Posted 12 Jun 2016 , 8:32pm
post #30 of 33

Thank you I'm planning on making mine tomorrow won't need it until next week but I want to make sure I do it right and practice thanks a lot for the tips :)

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