Quantity Pricing

Business By Teezerts Updated 6 May 2016 , 2:37am by johnson6ofus

Teezerts Posted 5 May 2016 , 2:26am
post #1 of 8

I know this question has been asked on here before, but I cannot seem to find it. So I am going to ask again. It has to do with cake pop pricing and quantity pricing.  Do any of you give a discount for making a larger quantity?  I personally do not feel like it should be done.  I just do not understand why customers think that it should cost less per dozen if they order 10 dozen.  Am I thinking wrong on this and should I be figuring my pricing differently?  It still takes me the same amount of time per dozen whether I am making 1 dozen or 12 dozen.  And it is not a problem as far as cake making goes...if I do not use all the cake for that order, I just make some to sell and I get rid of it. 

I would appreciate any opinions on this.

Thank you!

Teresa

Teezerts


7 replies
ypierce82 Posted 5 May 2016 , 3:05am
post #2 of 8

I don't give discounts. I don't believe in essentially lowering the price of my work in order to make them happy. Ingredients aren't discounted, nor is my time. I hate when someone says well of I order x amount, can I get a bulk discount?...... nope.

johnson6ofus Posted 5 May 2016 , 3:53am
post #3 of 8

The only time I agreed with this when someone gave a "standing" order, of 10 dozen per week or something so you could discount because you may then have "fill in work" to stay busy/ use staff more effectively -----OR------ if the order was so large that you could buy ingredients at a greater discount.

So, if you save on labor or ingredients, you could pass that on and still make the same $$$$.  Like mixing a "double" batch of cake takes about the same labor time as a single batch, so in some ways, making one dozen does take more time than ten dozen. Often times though, the customer expects a greater discount than the few labor minutes you may save.

johnson6ofus Posted 5 May 2016 , 3:53am
post #4 of 8

The only time I agreed with this when someone gave a "standing" order, of 10 dozen per week or something so you could discount because you may then have "fill in work" to stay busy/ use staff more effectively -----OR------ if the order was so large that you could buy ingredients at a greater discount.

So, if you save on labor or ingredients, you could pass that on and still make the same $$$$.  Like mixing a "double" batch of cake takes about the same labor time as a single batch, so in some ways, making one dozen does take more time than ten dozen. Often times though, the customer expects a greater discount than the few labor minutes you may save.

carolinecakes Posted 5 May 2016 , 3:54am
post #5 of 8

More cake = more work/ more ingredients = more $$$$  IMHO

costumeczar Posted 5 May 2016 , 11:03am
post #6 of 8

no discount! 

Teezerts Posted 5 May 2016 , 2:15pm
post #7 of 8

The latest inquiry for a  discount was for an order of 10 dozen cake pops, half of them were to be designed(very designed)!  She basically wanted me to do all of them for $1.00 each!!  I don't even do the basic round cake pops for that price!  I might as well be giving them away!  If they were all going to be basic rounds and that was it, I might have "thought" about giving a little discount.  But with half of them being very time consuming, I thought...no way!  I was very cordial to her about it though .  And she got really upset with me about it and said she did not think I would stay in business.  Well, I have to tell you, I have been doing cake pops for 6 years now and my business is doing just fine!  I am a one person business and I am not going to give away my product after working so hard!  It is just that time of year that I am getting larger orders and everyone is on a budget...I get that.  But I am too and I am doing this for a living, not for free!

There....rant done!

  Thanks for all the input though. 

Teresa

johnson6ofus Posted 6 May 2016 , 2:37am
post #8 of 8

free is not good. Glad you stood your ground against her whining.

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