Continue To Get Bubbles In My Buttercream

Decorating By koneal84 Updated 11 Jun 2016 , 4:48pm by ninatat

koneal84 Posted 4 May 2016 , 7:39pm
post #1 of 24

I have been decorating cakes for about 2 years now. I have recently started to get bubbles in just about every cake I make. A smooth iced cake has also fallen off the side of the cake before. With that being said, yes when I make a rosette cake they sometimes fall off. It's getting very frustrating to say the least. I don't know what is going on. I haven't changed my recipe up for my cakes or the buttercream. I'm not sure what to do. I did read that I could be mixing my iciing to much or to little. I have a kitchenaid stand up mixer and feel like I am mixing my icing the way I always have. I'm not sure where I am going wrong. I have always used Crisco shortening since I started making cakes. I know that I should change to a better brand but Crisco is convenient for me since I can get from Wal Mart and do not have to order online. There is no one around me that sales the better shortening unless I want to pay an arm and a leg for. Any help for me would be greatly appreciated. 


PS. If it comes down to it and I have to change to a better I will do it to keep this from continuing to happen.


Thank you in advance,

Kelly

23 replies
Tracyo18 Posted 4 May 2016 , 8:10pm
post #2 of 24

 I have never heard of that happening,. It could be something with the crisco...they are always changing things up with shortenings because of the transfats. I just need a good frosting recipe that doesn't have that shortening chemical after taste...  and is sturdy enough for piping and roses and taste good...ive tried butter and shortening mixed but it still has a weird taste. ..what kind of flavoring do you use? My family don't like almond. ..would you mind sharing your recipe?

640Cake Posted 4 May 2016 , 8:37pm
post #3 of 24

To eliminate air bubbles, I make two separate batches of buttercream and then combine them, so the buttercream comes up to the top of my paddle attachment.  I make two separate batches because I only have a 5 quart bowl and doing a double batch would be messy and/or time consuming.  But the point is to have enough icing to come up to the top of the paddle, so when you're mixing it, you do not incorporate any air.  I let it mix for about 10-15 minutes and I get satiny smooth buttercream, without any liquid (besides flavoring) added and no air bubbles.  I use all butter in my buttercream, so I cannot comment on the Crisco vs Hi-Ratio shortening.  Your rosettes may not have stuck to the side if your crumb coat or base coat was not tacky/sticky...maybe it dried/crusted by the time you tried to ice the rosettes??  Or perhaps the tip was not close enough to the side of the cake when you started the rosette?

kakeladi Posted 4 May 2016 , 9:13pm
post #4 of 24

640 said:............have enough icing to come up to the top of the paddle, so when you're mixing it, you do not incorporate any air.  I let it mix for about 10-15 minutes and I get satiny smooth buttercream, without any liquid (besides flavoring) added and no air bubbles. ....  Your rosettes may not have stuck to the side if your crumb coat or base coat was not tacky/sticky...maybe it dried/crusted by the time you tried to ice the rosettes??  Or perhaps the tip was not close enough to the side of the cake when you started the rosette?

She has good points.  Yes, it's best to have enough icing in the bowl that the beaters are completely covered and YES! do mix on the lowest speed for 10 minutes.  Here is an excellent recipe to try:  http://www.cakecentral.com/recipe/56745/2-of-everything-icing       I have never used hi ratio - always Crisco and it works very well using 1/2 butter & 1/2 Crisco.  I have never noticed a weird taste but we all have different taste buds:) As far as the rosettes not sticking to the cake that usually means the consistency of your icing is too thick.  Add a bit more  fat (butter or Crisco) OR a tablespoon of sour cream, yogurt (best) or even any liquid.  With the 2 of everything recipe you will not have that problem.  Along with that as 640 said, you may not be holding the tip close enough to the cake.

koneal84 Posted 4 May 2016 , 9:14pm
post #5 of 24

I do make 2 batches of buttercream in my mixer at one time. When I do this it does go over my paddle. My recipe for a double batch has 1 cup butter 3 cups shortening.  I don't think I've ever let my icing mix for 10 to 15 minutes. When I see it looks done mixing then I stop my mixer. It might take 5 minutes after I get everything in the mixer.  This weekend I made a cake with rosettes. I crumb coated it and then stacked it the night before because it had filling in it and I needed to ice it the next morning. I took it out of the frig and let it sit for a little bit. When I went to put the rosettes on it I put some fresh icing on it then put rosettes on. the coat that I put on wasn't dry and usually isn't because I usually crumb coat and then immediately put the rosettes on.

SeriousCakes Posted 5 May 2016 , 1:32am
post #6 of 24

How much powdered sugar do you use?

koneal84 Posted 5 May 2016 , 12:16pm
post #7 of 24

My recipe is 

1 cup butter

3 cups shortening

7 to 8 Tsp water

4 tsp flavoring

pinch salt

4 pounds confectioner sugar


I have not changed anything with it in years.

I don't let my icing mix 10 minutes because I read that the longer you let it mix air will get in the icing. With that being said I still get air bubbles and sometime not attachting to the cake like the icing should. 

-K8memphis Posted 5 May 2016 , 2:20pm
post #8 of 24

by air bubbles you mean air trapped under the icing that's already been applied to the cake and it billowing out from the side of the cake?

both  your issues (if i read this right) could be helped by making sure you jam the icing securely onto the cake -- also when i remember i place a samll hole in each layer through the icing into the cake in an inconspicuous place so the trapped air has somewhere to escape and leave the holes open all the way through serving

-K8memphis Posted 5 May 2016 , 2:21pm
post #9 of 24

by air bubbles you mean air trapped under the icing that's already been applied to the cake and it billowing out from the side of the cake?

both  your issues (if i read this right) could be helped by making sure you jam the icing securely onto the cake -- also when i remember i place a samll hole in each layer through the icing into the cake in an inconspicuous place so the trapped air has somewhere to escape and leave the holes open all the way through serving

kakeladi Posted 5 May 2016 , 6:20pm
post #10 of 24

OP said: ......don't let my icing mix 10 minutes because I read that the longer you let it mix air will get in the icing.......

That would probably be true if the beaters were not completely covered w/icing.  But long SLOW mixing makes the icing smooth and creamy.  Try it once.  

k8's ? might help us nail down an answer.

-K8memphis Posted 5 May 2016 , 7:25pm
post #11 of 24

typo in post 9 "i place a *small hole"

like made with a hat pin

koneal84 Posted 5 May 2016 , 10:37pm
post #12 of 24

Thank you all for your advice. I will be trying to mix a little longer for sure

-K8memphis Posted 6 May 2016 , 12:43am
post #13 of 24

would you describe the bubbles?

Tracyo18 Posted 6 May 2016 , 3:26am
post #14 of 24

Can you guys tell me a good tasting vanilla flavoring to use or any flavor that is good besides almond and what brand to use. 

kakeladi Posted 6 May 2016 , 5:58am
post #15 of 24

Tracyo - a combination of 3 flavors is best.  It gives the icing a complex taste that most people really like but 'just can't seem to figure out' :)

This formula is what you should follow: 1 part vanilla; 1/2 part butter flavor; 1/4 part other.   I always use almond for the 1/4 part but know of many who have used lemon and other flavors.  As for good tasting vanilla use pure not clear or imitation.  Can't think of the brand right off.  Some swear by Mexican others make their own from vanilla beans.  But it's best to pay the higher price for the good stuff.  

A "part" is ANY measure you want.  Can be teaspoon or Tablespoon or cups or gallons depending on how much you use it.  I mixed mine up by the gallon when I had my bakery.  

sykescakes Posted 6 May 2016 , 1:40pm
post #16 of 24

So I saw on a baking blog recently that if you have air bubbles in your buttercream you can put it in a food proccessor and run it on high for about 5 min and it will make the frosting smooth and dreamy. I personally have not tried it but it seems like an interesting idea. Has anyone out there done this and had good results?

Tracyo18 Posted 6 May 2016 , 2:28pm
post #17 of 24

KAKELADY

I would also love to have a great cream cheese icing recipe that's stable enough to decorate and make flowers with..my grandbabys loves that kind of frosting. ..do you have one to share?    Or DOES ANYONE HAVE A GREAT CREAM CHEESE ICING TO SHARE. .THAT'S STABLE ENOUGH FOR DECORATING.   Thank you 

kakeladi Posted 6 May 2016 , 4:26pm
post #18 of 24

There have been a number of threads regarding the use of white vinegar to get the tang cr ch gives .....try a google search for 'vinegar in buttercream on cakecentral' to find them quickly. 

joeyww12000 Posted 9 May 2016 , 10:52pm
post #19 of 24

I used to use Crisco but it left that greasy film in my mouth. I heard to use the shortening for baking and frying from walmart. I did and no greasy film. It tastes so much better.

woozy Posted 27 May 2016 , 4:58am
post #20 of 24

Crisco. I thought it was ruined when they took the cottonseed oil out, but they outdid themselves, and it continues to get worse. The wonderful shelf-life is gone, too.

Walmart stuff (in my opinion) is different every time you buy it.

IIf you don't want to get high-ratio, I found an "old school" shortening at ALDI.

koneal84 Posted 9 Jun 2016 , 4:50am
post #21 of 24
costumeczar Posted 9 Jun 2016 , 11:37am
post #22 of 24

You could also try adding a little more liquid to the icing. Or using some corn syrup in it to take the place of some of that good old trans fat texture.

shannonann Posted 11 Jun 2016 , 3:28pm
post #23 of 24

I live in an extremely dry environment. I finally figured out that I have to add a lot more liquid than the recipe calls for in order to achieve the proper consistency and get rid of air bubbles. 

Also, regarding shortening and the proper consistency of icing, you should watch Krazy Kool Kakes video on YouTube. They use Wal Mart brand shortening with transfats.

ninatat Posted 11 Jun 2016 , 4:48pm
post #24 of 24

i've been using the sugar shack recipe, it comes all the way up to the top of you bowl, mix on medium and then high for seven minutes and you can hear the air being sucked out, i use liquid flavored creamer, and add a stick of butter, it's the best one i've used and is not overly sweet, 

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