Oh No! I'm Not Happy

Decorating By joeyww12000 Updated 29 Apr 2016 , 5:48pm by Shasha2727

joeyww12000 Posted 27 Apr 2016 , 2:08pm
post #1 of 9

Made a cake for a client about two weeks ago. The cake was hot pink. The color turned out great, and the fondant didn't have an aftertaste. Today I'm making another cake and my daughter always begs for fondant...go figure. So, I give her a few bites and I see the left over pink and give her a bite of it. She spit it out....and then I try it. Bitter, bitter, bitter! What have I done? It didn't taste that way when I was decorating the cake or else I would not have give it to the client. She was amazed with the look of the cake when I delivered it and said she would give me a great review. I haven't heard from her since. Any suggestions?

8 replies
-K8memphis Posted 27 Apr 2016 , 3:46pm
post #2 of 9

whoa not cool huh -- i would figure the client's cake was fine since you haven't heard -- i always figure no news is good news -- but as far as your fondant -- maybe the food color was compromised and it made the fondant go bad? idk -- did you store at room temp?

joeyww12000 Posted 27 Apr 2016 , 4:08pm
post #3 of 9

It wasn't horrible, but it had that too much red after taste. It was wrapped in plastic wrap and inside a container, placed in my cabinet, room temp. It was bad enough where I wouldn't of been happy if I were the customer. Could the flavor intensify after sitting for a couple of weeks? I was just wondering what you guys would do. Would you contact the customer or leave well enough alone?

costumeczar Posted 27 Apr 2016 , 6:53pm
post #4 of 9

Fondant can start to ferment after a while, so I'd be willing to bet that's what happened. I wouldn't worry about it if it tasted okay when you did the cake originally.

joeyww12000 Posted 27 Apr 2016 , 6:54pm
post #5 of 9

Didn't help that it was Wilton brand. Maybe I'll learn my lesson one day.

jmt1714 Posted 27 Apr 2016 , 7:46pm
post #6 of 9

I wouldn't use Wilton brand in a cake I planned to have anyone eat  

Shasha2727 Posted 27 Apr 2016 , 8:09pm
post #7 of 9

Room temp is definitely a game changer. Just few days at room temperature & the fats in the cake begin to spoil. Mixed with eggs & flour, that are perishables. The taste will range from alcohol to just spoilage. You should ask your client if everything was ok, if you're close, & she hasn't followed thru w review. Focus on wether she is giving the review, perhaps. But the way the cake tasted after 2 weeks at room temp is no reflection on how it was when it was fresh. Don't worry!

kakeladi Posted 27 Apr 2016 , 9:39pm
post #8 of 9

Shasha - the bad taste is NOT the cake but the *leftover fondant* used on it.  

joey: don't contact the customer.  If there was a problem, believe me they would let you know :)

Shasha2727 Posted 29 Apr 2016 , 5:48pm
post #9 of 9

I accidentally removed a sheet cake from pastry freezer that had been triple wrapped, standard way I do for freezing cake. It sat for 5 days @ room temp, about 75 degrees. Wondered if I could serve some w some nice berries, so I unwrapped it & cut a few pieces. The taste & smell was like straight vanilla vodka! The cake was plain, looked a tad moist in a few spots, but otherwise looked fine, no mold or anything, but definitely was not edible. I had frozen other cakes that same day, so we tried another from the freezer & it was fine. My food handling instructor said that sugars mixed with fats ferment at room temp, & like grain or fruit, create alcohol like compounds. Not totally unlike the original beer, where grain became wet & fermented, & some smart Egyptian turned it in to a popular beverage. Fondant is 99% artificial ingredients, (not literally, just seems that way) but it spoils, too, especially once it's been in contact with icing or anything containing fat. Moral to the story, most things aren't good after 2 weeks at room temp.

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