Decorating But Don't Want To Refrigerate My Cakes Anymore

Decorating By liwalson1 Updated 30 May 2016 , 8:32pm by HannahsMomi

liwalson1 Posted 24 Apr 2016 , 6:55pm
post #1 of 22

Has anyone decorated cakes with success that were NOT refrigerated or frozen at any point after baking?  I do not like the texture of cake that has been refrigerated or frozen but I know it's easier to decorate with buttercream once you have popped the cake into the fridge to harden  the frosting.  I would like to start decorating cakes that are not ever stored in the refrigerator but wanted to know if anyone has had experience with this first and the problems that may arise if doing so. And if you do experience problems, are they easy to fix?

21 replies
-K8memphis Posted 24 Apr 2016 , 7:04pm
post #2 of 22

what is your end purpose -- are you delivering and selling them? or just for family?

if you are delivering -- you can potentially run into more problems there where they can fall apart from road vibrations and etc. -- and the other big thing is time management -- you will be limited as to how much you can produce and if you are doing all scratch you're even more limited --

if you work with cakes baked with oil rather than oil you can get a more similar texture in & out the fridge -- but butter cakes do not do well in & out the fridge --

some thoughts


kakeladi Posted 24 Apr 2016 , 8:51pm
post #3 of 22

Aahhh k8, k8, k8 ya know I love ya gal BUT............I sooooo disagree w/you on this :)  YES you CAN decorate and deliver cakes that have never been chilled in any way, shape or form :)  Now, where you live might have some bearing on it.  I am in central CA where our summers can top 100 but there is almost no humidity.    I started decorating in the 1980s and never knew the necessity of frig'ing or fz'ing any of my cakes.  For fillings I used jams, jellies and sleeved fillings  and b'creamed them all.  Never ran into any of the problems k8 mentions.  Here's a few pix of my 'older' cakes to give you an idea of what they looked like back then.  http://www.cakecentral.com/gallery/i/2222625/fire-dept-christmas     http://www.cakecentral.com/gallery/i/1379947/102-yrs-old           http://www.cakecentral.com/gallery/i/1376815/violets-amp-butterflies          http://www.cakecentral.com/gallery/i/1370492/round-amp-sq-choco-tiers                http://cdn001.cakecentral.com/gallery/2015/02/900_37SuP7_7-tiers-with-stairs.jpg  and showing off one last idea:  


Welcoming New Minister on Cake Central


kakeladi Posted 24 Apr 2016 , 9:04pm
post #4 of 22

Uuugggg can't edit posts:(  The big 7 tiered wedding cake was all b'cream and delivered some 50 miles away w/o a single problem.  In comparison the last pictured cake was delivered only about 1 1/2 miles away :)  It is all b'cream except for the fondant molded trims.

-K8memphis Posted 24 Apr 2016 , 10:29pm
post #5 of 22

pretty cakes, lynne -- yes i was listing potential problems -- i'm glad you never had any of them but this is what op asked for "problems that may arise"

costumeczar Posted 24 Apr 2016 , 11:30pm
post #6 of 22

I never decorate cakes when they're cold, I always work at room temp to minimize any issues that can arise when the cake warms up. Even with carved cakes and 3D ones, I figure that a softer room temp cake will reveal the problem areas better than if you're using a cold cake and letting it warm up after it's all been shaped and carved.  I DO refrigerate after they're all decorated and finished, though, because they're less likely to shift and fall over when being delivered if everything's cold.

I bake one day, cool and wrap and let them sit at room temp overnight, then decorate the next day.  That gives them time to totally cool down.

CWR41 Posted 25 Apr 2016 , 12:18am
post #7 of 22

Freezing adds moisture.  Do a taste test and see for yourself... bake two small cakes--freeze the layers for one cake then ice (either while frozen or thawed), ice the freshly-baked layers for the other cake.  My family can tell the difference every time--big difference.  If they eat a fresh cake, they want to know why it's not as good as my cakes usually are, as if something is wrong with it!

liwalson1 Posted 25 Apr 2016 , 12:58am
post #8 of 22

Thanks for your responses. I've been baking for many years but have been learning how to decorate for about a year and half now.  My family and I as well as most people I serve my cakes to can tell the difference when the cake is fresh and when it has been refrigerated then served at room temperature.  We all dislike the refrigerated/once frozen ones.  The texture is moist and more dense than the light, fluffy texture of my fresh cakes.  It's good to hear ( and see from the beautiful cakes above) that it can still be pulled off.

Can this be pulled off with fondant cakes as well?

costumeczar Posted 25 Apr 2016 , 1:00am
post #9 of 22

Yes, I cover them with fondant at room temp too.

Singerssoul Posted 25 Apr 2016 , 3:28am
post #10 of 22


Quote by @costumeczar on 2 hours ago

Yes, I cover them with fondant at room temp too.

Do you find you have any trouble with room temp cakes and crumb coating?

SeriousCakes Posted 25 Apr 2016 , 4:50am
post #11 of 22

I also do everything at room temp, here's a video I recently made showing how to decorate a cake:



costumeczar Posted 25 Apr 2016 , 12:01pm
post #12 of 22


Quote by @Singerssoul on 8 hours ago


Quote by @costumeczar on 2 hours ago

Yes, I cover them with fondant at room temp too.

Do you find you have any trouble with room temp cakes and crumb coating?

No problems. The idea of putting them in the fridge or freezing before decorating them has always been kind of weird to me. I went to culinary school 20+ years ago and we were never taught to do that, we did everything at room temp. If your icing is dragging the cake then it's just too thick, so thin it out a little and crumb coat it with that.

Singerssoul Posted 25 Apr 2016 , 2:12pm
post #13 of 22


Quote by @costumeczar on 2 hours ago


Quote by @Singerssoul on 8 hours ago


Quote by @costumeczar on 2 hours ago

Yes, I cover them with fondant at room temp too.

Do you find you have any trouble with room temp cakes and crumb coating?

No problems. The idea of putting them in the fridge or freezing before decorating them has always been kind of weird to me. I went to culinary school 20+ years ago and we were never taught to do that, we did everything at room temp. If your icing is dragging the cake then it's just too thick, so thin it out a little and crumb coat it with that.

Thank you :)  I usually crumb coat and fridge for 5 to add final coat on oil based cakes.  I will try this out~

leah_s Posted 25 Apr 2016 , 2:47pm
post #14 of 22

There's a BIG difference between refrigerating cakes and freezing cakes.  Refrigeration, especially home refrigerators are not good for cakes.  Freezers are actually helpful.  It s relative humidity thing.  I do not refrigerate cakes, but always freeze them even if overnight.  I always delivered room temp cakes and had no problems.

Juli2527 Posted 22 May 2016 , 10:17pm
post #15 of 22

hi Leah, what temprature do you keep your cakes?do you have a special cool room for your cakes? I do not want to fridge my cakes anymore, but it is so hot where i live, we reach 106 F almost every day,  and sometimes even my home AC is not enough. Any advise will be appreciated. Thanks.

leah_s Posted 22 May 2016 , 10:37pm
post #16 of 22

@Juli2527 I have a regular house with regular central air.  No special cool room.  Prob about 72 in the house all the time.

Juli2527 Posted 23 May 2016 , 12:04am
post #17 of 22

thanks for answering :)

MBalaska Posted 23 May 2016 , 12:09am
post #18 of 22

I don't get it.  you want to know if you can sell cakes that have never been refrigerated or frozen?  What is supposed to happen to a fresh cake & icing that would be bad? It's freshly made.   What is there to fix.....

Sure why not, do whatever you want to do with youre cakes and make them how you like them. 



Quote by @liwalson1 on 24 Apr 2016 , 11:55am

Has anyone decorated cakes with success that were NOT refrigerated or frozen at any point after baking?  I do not like the texture of cake that has been refrigerated or frozen but I know it's easier to decorate with buttercream once you have popped the cake into the fridge to harden  the frosting.  I would like to start decorating cakes that are not ever stored in the refrigerator but wanted to know if anyone has had experience with this first and the problems that may arise if doing so. And if you do experience problems, are they easy to fix?


liwalson1 Posted 28 May 2016 , 5:16pm
post #19 of 22

MBalaska, not sure what you don't get.  I didn't say anything about selling .  I mentioned preference of texture and taste of the two .    I only needed  to know if one can successfully decorate cakes without a whole lot of problems  if the cake is not refrigerated during the process

From the previous posts, I see that it can be done...

-K8memphis Posted 28 May 2016 , 5:20pm
post #20 of 22

so i meant to say '...cakes baked with oil rather than *butter'

Quote by @-K8memphis on 24 Apr 2016 , 2:04pm

if you work with cakes baked with oil rather than oil you can get a more similar texture in & out the fridge -- but butter cakes do not do well in & out the fridge --

some thoughts

HannahsMomi Posted 30 May 2016 , 8:31pm
post #21 of 22

liwalson1....just wanted to add my 2 cents!  I decorate and deliver cakes of all types and sizes at room temperature/unrefrigerated all of the time and it works just fine.  It can be done!  The only time I reg

HannahsMomi Posted 30 May 2016 , 8:32pm
post #22 of 22

liwalson1....just wanted to add my 2 cents!  I decorate and deliver cakes of all types and sizes at room temperature/unrefrigerated all of the time and it works just fine.  It can be done!  The only time I refrigerate a cake only when I have a perishable filling or cream cheese frosting.

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