Tips For Beginner

Decorating By yazzie Updated 4 Apr 2016 , 7:51am by yazzie

yazzie Posted 3 Apr 2016 , 12:15pm
post #1 of 9

Hi I am new to cake decorating. I used to make cakes for the children when they were small, but now I have some spare time I would like to do it as a hobby, I am not very arty so don't know if I will be able to do anything spectacular but I would love to be accomplish a beautiful cake. 

I am finding the thought of piping writing very daunting as I don't have brilliant handwriting will this hamper how I could write on a cake. 

Thank you in advance xx

8 replies
MimiFix Posted 3 Apr 2016 , 12:33pm
post #2 of 9

We all get better with practice. For piping words, I suggest block letters and practicing on a surface that allows you to scrape off and reuse the icing. I use the back of a cake pan, but waxed or parchment paper, plates, etc., are also very good. (But large flat cookies are the tastiest!)

Jinkies Posted 3 Apr 2016 , 1:13pm
post #3 of 9

Yes, practice, as Mimi said, is the key.  My tip would be to go buy a cheap little can of pre-made frosting and use that to practice.   

You could also print out some writing on a piece of paper and put it under  a piece of parchment to use as a guide.  When you've used your frosting up- scrape it off the paper and put it back in your bag and you can use it over and over to practice. 

carolinecakes Posted 3 Apr 2016 , 1:55pm
post #4 of 9

Yes what MimiFix and Jinkies said......  my handwriting looks like chicken scratch, when I discovered TAPPITS, I was in heaven. By all means keep practicing, and while you perfect your piping, you can get a really professional look using the tappits.

Here's a tutorial.......

yazzie Posted 3 Apr 2016 , 4:21pm
post #5 of 9

Thank you so much for your replies. I'm so looking forward to this fab craft and it's so nice to have encouragement form people like yourselves. X

kakeladi Posted 3 Apr 2016 , 5:57pm
post #6 of 9

Re writing:  Find a font on  the computer, print it in mirror image.  Now you write over it with royal icing (other options in link below), and turn it over onto the cake. Now you have an impression of the writing to pipe over.  There is a thread on this site about this -  that tells you how you can do it and use the pattern over and over.

Cher2309b Posted 4 Apr 2016 , 2:45am
post #7 of 9

I agree with all of the above. 

An extra thought: try piping funky letters - different sizes, directions, wonky letters, words/letters meandering up and down. If you play around with this you may find that any "mistakes" are hidden in the style. I'm talking from experience: my writing and piping are pretty bad but I'm no longer afraid to have a go. (Just don't ask me to pipe anything fine or delicate.)

Xena03 Posted 4 Apr 2016 , 6:50am
post #8 of 9

Hey Yazzie,

Most handwriting looks bad when the letters are different sizes, unevenly spaced or lean in different directions.  To practice your icing skills simply begin by practicing your handwriting.  Look at some calligraphy tutorials to help you see what I mean.  For instance and o and an e should be the same size and the same basic shape.  Read about how to properly space letters so they look cohesive.  Once you feel you've got the basic rules of neat handwriting down do some practice runs with a piping bag on some parchment or wax paper.  In the beginning you can lay a nice printed font under your parchment as a guide to pipe over.  With the right knowledge, technique and some practice you can adapt it to any font you like and your freehand handwriting will the envy of the cake world.

Good luck!

yazzie Posted 4 Apr 2016 , 7:51am
post #9 of 9

Thanks so much for your help. I've ordered some tappits, download handwriting sheets and some icing practice sheets to get me started. Xx 

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