Can I Decorate My Mmf Cake And Freeze It Ahead Of Time

Decorating By coloradocache Updated 31 Mar 2016 , 12:02pm by JustVcakes

coloradocache Posted 27 Mar 2016 , 1:37am
post #1 of 7

I'm making an 8" tiered cake due two weeks from now for a birthday party.  I have my MMF fondant made and resting in the refrigerator, the cake layers staked and crumb coated and frozen in the freezer.  Could i actually slightly thaw the cake, cover the cake in MMF fondant, fully decorate it  tomorrow and then freeze it until the day before the party and then thaw it or will the fondant turn wet and all of my decorating details dissolve before by eyes?

Thank you!

6 replies
ropalma Posted 28 Mar 2016 , 4:02pm
post #2 of 7

I think you are asking for a mess.  When you thaw things sweat.  You should not fondant on a semi thawed cake.  This is my opinion.  Hopefully someone else chimes in :)

sugarbritches Posted 28 Mar 2016 , 6:52pm
post #3 of 7

I agree.  First, your fondant shouldn't be in the fridge.  Keep it in a sealed container at room temp.  My advice, when you decide to decorate it, thaw everything (you can have it pretty cold in the middle or slightly frozen in the center but mostly thawed.  I made this mistake before and the fondant began to sweat horribly.  All my decorations slid off and it was a MESS.  Anyway, when mostly thawed but still cold, cover with fondant then decorate.  You can freeze after that, but wrap it really well with plastic wrap and keep it wrapped whilst it unthaws - the condensation will remain on the outside of plastic wrap.

coloradocache Posted 29 Mar 2016 , 12:39am
post #4 of 7

Thank you!!  I'm going to wait :)

maybenot Posted 31 Mar 2016 , 2:45am
post #5 of 7

I have a "one freeze" rule, so in a case like this--with the crumb coated cake in the freezer already--I'd be decorating it right before delivery.  I'd thaw it in the fridge overnight and then let it come to almost room temp before applying the finish buttercream.  I'd then put it back in the fridge for 10-15 mins. to allow the BC to harden a bit and apply the fondant.  There'd be little to no sweating that way.

Now, you call it an " 8" tiered cake" that is already "stacked".  I'm not sure what you mean by that.  Is it an 8" cake made of multiple layers that has been assembled, crumb coated, and frozen  OR is it a tiered cake made up of several assembled layer cakes that is already stacked?  If it's the second scenario, it will need to be unstacked for it to be properly covered in fondant--each cake is covered and then the cake is stacked.

You can cover cakes in fondant, freeze them, defrost them, and have them be fine.  You just need to follow these instructions so that the sweat goes to a cardboard box and not to the cake surface.

Box completed cake in a cardboard box. Wrap box in several layers of plastic wrap and a layer of foil.  Freeze.  24hrs. b/4 serving, defrost wrapped box in fridge.  Several hours b/4 serving, place wrapped box on counter for cake to come to room temp.  Right b/4 serving, remove cake from box.  Box may feel damp.  Cake will look and taste like it was just made.

This cake was handled in the way described above and it was perfect once defrosted.

klick+bride+cake+small.JPG

sugarbritches Posted 31 Mar 2016 , 3:18am
post #6 of 7

Great advice about the box! I'm going to use that.  I also like the freeze once rule.


JustVcakes Posted 31 Mar 2016 , 12:02pm
post #7 of 7

I've frozen a fondant cake and shipped it to family.  Turned out find, but it was Satin Ice fondant.  I put all my fondant cakes in the fridge.  Your problem with refrigeration is if it's humid or warm, then the cake sweats. I'm currently in a dry cool place, so sweating isn't a major issue.

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