Jagged Buttercream Rose Petals!

Decorating By CakeDesigner1 Updated 11 Feb 2016 , 5:15pm by kakeladi

CakeDesigner1 Posted 11 Feb 2016 , 4:26am
post #1 of 7

I don't know why my roses are turning out jagged like this... I tried adding a few drops of corn syrup. 56bc0d889d759.jpeg

6 replies
kakeladi Posted 11 Feb 2016 , 5:27am
post #2 of 7

This is a common problem  especially for newbies :)  But..........personally I *LIKE* my roses to look like that.  Look at real ones in a garden - not from a florist.  You will find most of the petals are much like that.

Your  icing is too stiff.  Try beating in a tablespoon of fat (ie: crisco).  Also work faster:)    

MBalaska Posted 11 Feb 2016 , 11:40am
post #3 of 7

http://www.cakecentral.com/gallery/i/3353658/american-buttercream-rose-cake


mine do that with ambc,  you can open the tip a bit with a knife and do as kakeladi suggests.  I like them that way also.

-K8memphis Posted 11 Feb 2016 , 12:54pm
post #4 of 7

if you cup your finger around each petal as you pipe it looks ever the more realistic -- bend the edge over -- also make sure there's no icing clump in the narrow end of the tube

cakedout Posted 11 Feb 2016 , 3:33pm
post #5 of 7

I agree that your icing is too stiff. It is better to add a touch more shortening than corn syrup, imho.  

Also, while your overall rose looks good, I would also suggest a tad more pressure and a quicker movement.  It's actually quite surprising how much pressure is needed to make the petals!  I always told my students to think about making "little horseshoes".  It kind of helped them remember to make their movements shorter and quicker, rather that trying to do a 'slow wrap'.   :) 

virago Posted 11 Feb 2016 , 4:54pm
post #6 of 7

I always thought (maybe niavely) that this was the best a petal could get with 'crisco' based buttercream...that if I splurged for a hi-ratio shortening (sweetex, alpine), petal appearance would be much smoother. am I wrong? 

kakeladi Posted 11 Feb 2016 , 5:15pm
post #7 of 7

When icing is the proper consistency and one uses enough pressure, working quickly you should NOT have to modify a tip!  Very, very few tips ever need modifying.   It's far better to learn how to work with your icing than change the equipment.

To virgo you might be right but no everyone wants or can buy the expensive shortenings.   I have worked with Crisco for over 30 yrs.  Yes, I tried Alpine but felt it made little difference so not worth the extra expense.  But then not everyone is as cheap as I am! :)

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