First Wedding Cake

Baking By LittlHart Updated 26 Jan 2016 , 10:58pm by LittlHart

LittlHart Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 2:21am
post #1 of 9

Hello!  A few months ago I decided to build a whole new career in baking.  I'm at home with very young kids and I've taken a few entry level evening classes at my local culinary school and somehow ended up with an order for a wedding cake!  The client is a friend of a friend and I've been honest with her about never having done a tiered cake before, but she is still totally in.  

I need help! She wants semi-nude with real flower decoration so the fussy stuff is taken care of, and I already have a ton of very nice icing recipes, but I need some good scratch sponge recipes (I prefer weight measure to volume) and would love to know how big I should make it for 150ppl.


Thanks everyone!

8 replies
julia1812 Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 8:41am
post #2 of 9

Well...A "classic " 3 tier round cake to feed 150 would be 12-9-6 each layer 6" high.

But there are so many shapes, tier combinations etc, I think best is to sit down with her and decide. There is a great software which allows you to build different tiers in any hight and shape online to visualize it easier. That's what I normally use.

Now just a few thoughts...

- do you need a licence where you are?

- are you recipes all tried and tested well?

- are you confident/ able to stack a 3-4 tier cake well and not end up with a disaster on her wedding day?

- have you ever covered a big tall tier in fondant?

- do you have enough / an extra fridge/ freezer to store and chill the cake before transport?

- will you be able to carry it and fit it in your car?

-what's your backup plan if you or one of your kids falls sick? 

I don't want to disencourage you, but you should concider those points.

Jinkies Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 11:55am
post #3 of 9

Hi there!  Check out Gretchens Bakery.  She has a blog and a youtube channel.  All her recipes are scratch and by weight.  She also does a video showing you how to mix them and she's really good about answering questions on her blog, if you need help. I've been baking my whole life and I still learned a ton of stuff from her re: the science of baking.


Good luck!!

LittlHart Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 1:29pm
post #4 of 9

@julia1812 Your concerns are my concerns, that's why I'm here! The wedding is in August so I will have lots of time to recipe test and do test stacks, lets just say I plan on going through a whole lot of cake over the next couple months.  I need to grab some dependable recipes and make sure that I have this in the bag,I want to be able to successfully produce this cake by the end of May so if it isn't going to happen she'll still have 3 months to order elsewhere.

no licence needed

I do however need some good sponge recipes

I need to test dowel vs bubble straw vs sps

it's a naked cake so I won't need to get fussy with fondant

the fridge will be tight but managable

I will have to transport with seperate tiers and assemble on site

my husband will have to take time off if the kids are sick

6-9-12 is excellent advice, that is what I will work with.


@Jinkies that looks awesome, I will definitely take a look at her recipes and videos.  Thanks!



*Last edited by LittlHart on 26 Jan 2016 , 1:31pm
LittlHart Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 1:49pm
post #5 of 9

Ha! just googled this and I baked and loved her vanilla sponge last year, had totally forgotten how to find it though, awesome!

Quote by @Jinkies on 1 hour ago

Hi there!  Check out Gretchens Bakery.  She has a blog and a youtube channel.  All her recipes are scratch and by weight.  She also does a video showing you how to mix them and she's really good about answering questions on her blog, if you need help. I've been baking my whole life and I still learned a ton of stuff from her re: the science of baking.


Good luck!!


-K8memphis Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 4:28pm
post #6 of 9

i think building your first cake with 6" tall tiers is possible but a greater degree of difficulty than necessary -- your cakes are going to have serve perfectly to achieve this because servings will be cut 2/3 of an inch wide and will hang off the average size cake plate --

like julia said the 150 serving cake is quite the elusive size -- so many different ways to go --

for example 14x11x8x5 -- all 4" tall round tiers and would be perfect if they want to keep the top tier for the first anniversary -- the bottom 3 tiers are exactly 149.6 servings -- but that would be a very pretty silhouette -- and a great size even if they don't keep the top tier -- i always add in a few extra servings anyhow --

you need to have this as a tool http://capitalconfectioners.com/cakulator/cakulator.html where you can plug in the possible sizes you want and it will calculate it for you -- and the wilton wedding cake data chart here http://www.wilton.com/cms-wedding-cake-data.html

best to you -- i/we love to help you with your cake -- 

julia1812 Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 5:43pm
post #7 of 9

Oh...just looked up that software. It's www.bakingit.com It's free for laptops and computer. @K8memphis : you're right, cutting a 6" tall cake isn't easy but I always use seperator plates at 3" which allows to to cut even wider slices as with regular 4" high tiers. Personally I findustry taller tiers more elegant for a wedding cake...but that's a choice every bride has to make. Good luck @LittlHart!

kakeladi Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 10:06pm
post #8 of 9

I agree mostly w/K8:)  I think 4" tall tiers are much easier to serve.  You have to teach the bride/customer that they can't always get *exactly* what they want (meaning exactly) 150 servings) Remember about 10-15% of the people invited will not come.  Does the bride want to come close to (just under) the # or go over - she has to decide that.  Is her family BIG cake eaters or is this just for looks &/or dessert.    Serving a full sit down meal or light finger foods?  Will there be a 'sweet table' (candy/cookies/other dessert type food)?  These are thing that will help decide her #s.  Oh, be sure to charge for all servings - if they get a cake that serves say 160 (industry standard size) you charge for 160 - not the 150.  

these are just some of the things the 'professional' decorator needs to learn - and it takes time to learn all the little helpful hints.

LittlHart Posted 26 Jan 2016 , 10:44pm
post #9 of 9

So we've only communicated by email and she let me know that they "are expecting around 200 people" but they only just sent out their save the dates so no numbers yet.  I flat out told her that I wasn't comfortable making a cake that big and she responded "we are planning a sweets table so the cake won't have to be too big as guests will have many options for dessert including the one after dinner.  I would say the cake is more for photos" and that was my only direction on size, I chose 150 as a guess.  My husband and I are guests at the wedding and I am doing the cake as her wedding gift.


These are the pics she sent me as a style guide, so it looks like she likes taller tires but I'll clarify with her.

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*Last edited by LittlHart on 26 Jan 2016 , 10:58pm

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