Scroll Work Piping/airbrush

Decorating By Cakemoms24 Updated 9 Jan 2016 , 4:11am by kakeladi

Cakemoms24 Posted 6 Jan 2016 , 12:07am
post #1 of 4

Hey everyone! I am new to CC & love all the cake advice I see it's very helpful! I am wanting to know about piping. specifically when doing scroll work. When I have tried, my icing tends to either be too runny or not thin enough and I am looking for the perfect consistency. What icing should i be using for any type of piping? i use buttercream normally but detailed work im not sure why my royal icing is not working as well. I see so many beautiful tiered cakes with this and I want to give it a go, any advice is well appreciated!! and also I am looking to buy an airbrush. Don't want to spend a ton on it but want a good outcome. Thanks!!

3 replies
kakeladi Posted 7 Jan 2016 , 7:16pm
post #2 of 4

The exact consistency is something you are going to have to work out yourself.  What might be perfect to me could be too thick or thin for you.  A lot depends on how hot your kitchen and hands are.   How heavy is your 'squeeze' - how hard you can squeeze the icing through each different tube etc, etc.  I worked in b'cream.  Doing scrolls was easy for me once I perfected the consistency just right for me.

Cakemoms24 Posted 8 Jan 2016 , 12:48am
post #3 of 4

Good thinking, I'll try out a few things and see what works best. do you have any suggestions on how to do good scrolls other than practice? I have a pretty steady hand but they look so whimsical on cakes. 

*Last edited by Cakemoms24 on 8 Jan 2016 , 12:48am
kakeladi Posted 9 Jan 2016 , 4:03am
post #4 of 4

Use a 1/2 circle to makr where you want the scroll to go and follow it.  Can yoou post a pic of what you have done?  Maybe suggestions would be different if I could see what  you are doing/how they look.  

But.......really nothing beats practice, practice, practice!  Practice makes perfect :)

As for making cinsistency just right it might take a bit more shortening or liquid..  You want a consistency that is a bit on the soft side but not mushy.  Usually extra fat is what is needed rather than liquid.

Make up a batch of Wilton's classroom icing w/o flavoring - basically just shortening and sugar, then make it creamier by adding more fat, rather than soft by using liquid.  Use it for practice over & over.    Once you think you have it perfect, then try using your 'real' recipe by using the amounts of fat and sugar w/flavoring and a dash of salt.  Don't have any idea what you are using for an icing recipe so you will just have to play around as I said before :)

*Last edited by kakeladi on 9 Jan 2016 , 4:11am

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