Questions For Socal Bakers

Baking By rr2sweet Updated 4 Sep 2015 , 7:19am by Apti

rr2sweet Posted 4 Sep 2015 , 4:03am
post #1 of 4

Hi! I'm new to the area originally from the north east so I'm still getting used to the dryer weather. I was wondering how well modeling chocolate holds up out here, I'm tempted to make my figurines out of it but I'm afraid they might melt, also can you use candy melts as big lie for your cake or will they melt causing the things on the cake to fall off. Finally what kind of frosting do you usually use, I've been using SMBC but am noticing it gets softer a lot quicker out Here. That's all for now. TIA.

3 replies
rr2sweet Posted 4 Sep 2015 , 4:06am
post #2 of 4

Big lie is supposed to say glue lol

Norcalhiker Posted 4 Sep 2015 , 5:08am
post #3 of 4

Having lived in SoCal for 5 yrs, all I can say is your work is cut out for you!  SMBC is fine in a highly air conditioned room, but forget about letting it sit out for long in the absence of air conditioning. I found IMBC to be a bit more robust, but not a lot.  SoCal is desert country, but there's still humidity give the proximity to the ocean, so you have to take both heat and humidity into consideration.  Even a shortening icing will droop when it starts to climb in the 80's.  A friend of mine did a wedding cake last year mid summer.  The bride forgot to mention there was no refrigeration available for the cake, which was scheduled for delivery a couple hours before the ceremony.  By the time of the cake cutting the cake was a disaster.

your best bet is to keep your cake as chilled as possible before you start to decorate--and I mean nearly frozen.  Make sure that crumb coat is chilled to solid.  Take care not to use too much icing--think avalanche here.  I've had a cake with piped SMBC rosettes sit out for a couple of hours (started chilled overnight) but i wouldn't take it beyond that.  I live in NorCal now--a lot cooler, but still a warm climate.  Last month I transported a cake from SF to my house, just shy of two hours transit time cuz I had to make a stop.  A quick turn in the kitchen with the cake in hand and the icing slid; then the weigh sift sent the entire cake sliding across my kitchen floor. 

Molding chocolate...again if it's in heat, you'll have issues.  You may want to consider gumpaste 

Apti Posted 4 Sep 2015 , 7:19am
post #4 of 4

Hi, and welcome to the forum.  I don't know where you are in SoCal, but there are Cake Clubs in various places in southern California that could provide all sorts of assistance. 

http://www.sandiegocakeclub.com/  

I belong to this club which is located near downtown San Diego.  They are having a meeting on September 14 at 7 pm.

http://cacakeclub.com/links/  

I also belong to the California Cake Club and have taken weekend trips to visit other SoCal clubs.  The link above will provide info about each of the different locations.

I am a hobby baker and when I give cakes away, my assumption is that they will not be refrigerated and may be setting out on a counter or table for hours and hours.  I do not use ANY real cream cheese frosting or ingredients unless I am personally going to be at the event and can control the refrigeration and exposure time to room temperature.

My favorite frosting is an American buttercream with both high ratio shortening and unsalted butter, called Bunny's Mock Shack.

http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=7&threadid=135663    

I recently made a 3 tier graduation cake with dark chocolate ganache and used dark chocolate Guittard A'Peels as the top of the graduation cap (college grad event).  It was held on a shaded patio outside an Italian restaurant and the temperature was about 80 with a slight breeze.  Although I pulled it off, it was a close one!

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