Help! Condensation On Fondant!

Decorating By Sophk Updated 25 Aug 2015 , 12:27pm by Shockolata

Sophk Posted 21 Aug 2015 , 7:50am
post #1 of 13

Ive been working on a 5 tiered wedding cake. Im in London Uk. Usually covering with sugarpaste/fondant isnt a problem for me. But last night Aaargh! I did a covering of BC and fridged all my cakes over night. Then yesterday took them out one by one to cover in sugarpaste. Iv not idsues with my method before. BUT this time they immediately became wet (due to condensation) because i had taken them out of the fridge. So i wasnt able to smooth out for long as it very quickly became tacky. I was still calm as this happens sometimes and i knew once theyre left to come back to room temp and dry out they'll be fine. Oh was i wrong. I woke up this morning and theyre still part tacky/wet! I cant hold the tiers to stack them as theyre not dried out and id leave marks or dents for sure. I am beginning to worry. Also i need to deliver this tomorrow about 1.5 hrs drive away. I always stack and take but am thinking of half stacking into 2 sections and taking. But havent a clue how id stack at venue if cakes arent dried out! How will i even hold them??! Help please. My nerves are all over the place.

12 replies
julia1812 Posted 21 Aug 2015 , 10:21am
post #2 of 13

Could you pop them back into the fridge? The condensation will disappear and after an hour or so you'll be able to take them out and stack them. If you have a big fridge pop them back in after stacking and remove just before delivery. Ac on in the car and you should be fine. 

I think the condensation might be because of the heat. Or has it cooled down in the UK again? 

cakesrock Posted 21 Aug 2015 , 2:11pm
post #3 of 13

I freeze all my fondant cakes and then let them dry off at room temp. BUT I live in a very dry climate. However, when it's been damper than usual, I just use a fan - works perfectly!

PS: I don't put my fondant cakes in the fridge because it does that and it causes them to dry out on the inside (my experience anyway). So I avoid perishable fillings. 

Shockolata Posted 21 Aug 2015 , 10:30pm
post #4 of 13

It might have been the fondant you were using. Maybe it needed a bit extra icing sugar. I am quite disappointed with the quality of fondant lately. It has changed a lot since I bought my last batch. It's runnier and sags and gets a lot of air bubbles, too. A real pain! I hope you will be able to sort the problem out. Cross your fingers, say a prayer and hope for the best :)

kanwalaqdas Posted 21 Aug 2015 , 10:37pm
post #5 of 13

This happened to me and i started to panic as well... but i kept my fondant covered cakes in a chilled air con room and waited for three hours and they were dry and perfect. just calm down and keep them in a chilled room.. best of luck

efatrie Posted 21 Aug 2015 , 11:30pm
post #6 of 13

Is weather at London hot and humid? I would place it in a chilled aircon room too, and try to work on it. Then I would place in the cake box, shrink wrap the entire box and transport to venue. I hope the venue is air-conditioned? Good luck! :)

Shockolata Posted 22 Aug 2015 , 3:16pm
post #7 of 13

@efatrie   English weather is atrocious. When it gets warm, it gets really warm and our homes are not planned to deal with weather extremes. E.g. we have huge window panes to let in sunlight on cold dark winter days but in summer when we get the sun rise at 4 am and it hits the windows consistently throughout the day, we are melting! Of course there are no shutters in this country which are commonplace in the hot Mediterranean countries. I had to buy thick blackout curtains to try and maintain some sort of comfort indoors. 

efatrie Posted 23 Aug 2015 , 2:23am
post #8 of 13

@Shockolata  I see.. I live in Asian country where it is hot and humid all year round (maybe exclude rainy days haha). Both hot and rainy days can be challenging for fondant cakes, but so far I have found luck in exclusively using dark chocolate ganache (high chocolate ratio). There's no need to refrigerate at all, and the cake remains fresh in room temp :)

Shockolata Posted 23 Aug 2015 , 7:57am
post #9 of 13

@efatrie   how does chocolate ganache stay fresh without refrigeration when it contains double (or whipping) cream? Do you use a recipe without the cream perhaps? 

Sophk Posted 23 Aug 2015 , 10:22pm
post #10 of 13

Hi all thank you so much for your replies! I managed to complete the cake. And in the end it came together just great. Although i couldnt bare to look at it because i knew how stressfull the process had been! The condensation eventually dried out with my dehumidifier on. But the sugarpaste/fondant was soft to the touch so it hadnt fully set/dried/firmed up. This was stressful, especially when I stacked the tiers! But it looked just brilliant in the end.. so, Happy customer... happy me


jay-jay40 Posted 23 Aug 2015 , 10:34pm
post #11 of 13

I'm in the UK to and I have just experienced this same problem covered a cake with black sugar paste and next morning it was wet and sticky we don't have air conditioning in our homes here so what I did was put a heater on very low to dry the moisture out in the air while having a fan directly blowing on the cake worked a treat xx

-K8memphis Posted 23 Aug 2015 , 10:53pm
post #12 of 13

sophk well it's a tall stately and elegant cake so well done -- great save -- beautiful work --

jay-jay40, you are the bravest person i know -- so glad that worked out for you --'nuther great save 

edited for typo

*Last edited by -K8memphis on 23 Aug 2015 , 10:53pm
Shockolata Posted 25 Aug 2015 , 12:27pm
post #13 of 13

@Sophk  well done! :)

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