Brown Sugar= Moister Cake?

Baking By Joppette Updated 20 Aug 2015 , 10:33pm by Norcalhiker

Joppette Posted 20 Aug 2015 , 8:12pm
post #1 of 4

I'm making a scratch

spice cake for my son's wedding. Will brown sugar make the cake more moist, instead of white sugar?

3 replies
-K8memphis Posted 20 Aug 2015 , 9:30pm
post #2 of 4

yes a bit

-K8memphis Posted 20 Aug 2015 , 10:00pm
post #3 of 4

but these ingredients are not always interchangeable either -- i have a brownie recipe that when i switch to b sugar i can make individual 'crater brownies' that have a big hole in there and it's a wonderful lush texture and you can fill the crater with a scoop of ice cream or whipped cream or whatever --

but for cake just depends on what you're doing it might be fine it might not

Norcalhiker Posted 20 Aug 2015 , 10:33pm
post #4 of 4

Sugar is hydroscopic, it attracts water from the environment. Part of the role sugar place in baking is to attract water from the flour thereby preventing too much gluten from developing.  Substituting with brown sugar will produce a moister cake, but be aware of all the liquids in your recipe since it holds more moisture than white sugar. You don't want to undermine the cake's structure. 

Also, I would recommend pure cane sugar. While both are sucrose, sugar beet is a root (not to mention nearly all sugar beets are GMO); sugar cane is a grass. This means that there is a difference in the mineral and protein profile of the two plants.  That difference effects the way beet sugar bakes and cooks.  For instance, if you brûlée beet sugar, it barely caramelizes, where cane sugar will.
Since it's a spice cake, the change in color won't be an issue. I've been developing a almond cardamom cake with chai tea white chocolate ganache filling and mocha buttercream--the cake color looks lovely set against the ivory filling and mocha buttercream. 

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