Stacked Tres Leches Cake Covered In Fondant??? Help?

Decorating By sholbrook72 Updated 11 Jul 2015 , 6:31pm by sholbrook72

sholbrook72 Posted 9 Jul 2015 , 5:46pm
post #1 of 10

Has ANYONE made a two tiered Tres Leches cake covered in fondant?  I've seen pics of it done and I've heard from other groups to not even go there.  I'm desperate to find anyone who has actually done one and if they could offer any tips and advice about the actual baking process to the decorating of the cake.  I thought I might be able to half the amount of the milk poured over the cake so it's not so wet.  I would really like to discuss this with someone who has done this type of cake before.  TIA!!!!

9 replies
SweetDesire88 Posted 10 Jul 2015 , 4:42am
post #2 of 10

Fondant and 3 leches in my opinion don't go together. I specialize in 3 leches cakes and the only whipping cream to cover the cake. 

Good luck if you decided to go with it. 

SquirrellyCakes Posted 10 Jul 2015 , 12:41pm
post #3 of 10

I agree with SweetDesire88, the two don't go together according to my tastebuds. Not just the taste but the chewy texture with the Tres Leches in my opinion, is a turn off. What would you use under the fondant to adhere it to the cake?  That is an awful lot of moisture to trap under fondant. Cutting the cake might be an issue too.

Perhaps someone who has done this will offer help. Have you tried a search on the topic? I remember 8- 10 years ago or so this topic came up.


sholbrook72 Posted 10 Jul 2015 , 2:27pm
post #4 of 10

I hadn't thought too much about the chewiness of the fondant with the tres leches.  I have seen other pics around that say they are tres leches cakes with obvious fondant.  I was going to try a sample cake to see what happens.  I had read other posts where bakers have made this cake, but didn't drench the cake with the 3 milks.  Instead, gave it enough of a coating in the cake to make it moist, but not too much where it is leaking.  I have a customer who has ordered this for her sons birthday and I really wanted to do the research on it.  I'm going to experiment today though.  I just wish I could here from someone who has actually tried this.  

jgifford Posted 10 Jul 2015 , 9:42pm
post #5 of 10

I did a search here on CC and found several.  One was by "sisita".  You might try pm-ing her and see if she could help you.

remnant3333 Posted 11 Jul 2015 , 6:14am
post #6 of 10

 I made a three layer tres leche cake before that was totally soaked with three milks and had no issues. I piled on the three milks.  I also used stabilized whip cream icing which works out great for Tres Leche cakes. If whip cream is stabilized you can make borders. I had mandarin oranges on bottom layer, peaches on middle layer and strawberries and pineapple on top layer. I made it for a Guatemalan friend's birthday and all said the cake was much better than the Latin American bakeries here in North Chas, S.C.

Good luck, I am sure yours will come out fine!!!

Dr_Hfuhruhurr Posted 11 Jul 2015 , 3:47pm
post #7 of 10


Quote by @sholbrook72 on 1 day ago

I hadn't thought too much about the chewiness of the fondant with the tres leches.  I have seen other pics around that say they are tres leches cakes with obvious fondant. 


Not saying it's impossible to do, but I'm not sure I would put much stock in people online claiming a cake is "tres leches." Too many people treat tres leches as a flavor, rather than a process.

Dr_Hfuhruhurr Posted 11 Jul 2015 , 3:49pm
post #8 of 10


Quote by @remnant3333 on 9 hours ago

 I made a three layer tres leche cake before that was totally soaked with three milks and had no issues. I piled on the three milks.  I also used stabilized whip cream icing which works out great for Tres Leche cakes. If whip cream is stabilized you can make borders. I had mandarin oranges on bottom layer, peaches on middle layer and strawberries and pineapple on top layer. I made it for a Guatemalan friend's birthday and all said the cake was much better than the Latin American bakeries here in North Chas, S.C.


Sounds delicious, but OP wants to cover in fondant.

ResaMarie Posted 11 Jul 2015 , 4:26pm
post #9 of 10

My wedding cake was tres leches and there is no way it would have turned out well with fondant. The texture of tres leches is meant to be like cake that soaked up ice cream. There is no place for fondant in that. With a cake like that, that is where your piping skills should shine. I think people confuse something like hot milk cake and tres leches and maybe that is what op saw. Just my two cents. 

sholbrook72 Posted 11 Jul 2015 , 6:31pm
post #10 of 10

Thanks for everyone's input.  I realized it was gonna come down to this.  I know a true tres leches cake is too wet to do many things to it.  The customer is wanting a two tier tres leches.  The theme she is wanting is a jungle theme and it has a lot of fondant accents to it.  I would say I wouldn't have to cover the cakes in fondant, but I honestly don't think I could ice in a whipped icing and it hold all the fondant characters, decorations, accents, etc. for the cake.  I guess I was hoping someone has done a white cake using the three milks, but not saturating the milks so much it is leaking, but soaked through to be a really moist cake and stacked it using fondant.  I guess not.  Just trying to figure out how to let the customer know and hoping not to upset her.  I know most people don't know anything about baking and decorating so she may just be unaware it is not a good possibility.  

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