Pastry Pride In The Heat

Decorating By tripleE Updated 9 Jul 2015 , 6:20pm by Cakemom21

tripleE Posted 8 Jul 2015 , 7:27pm
post #1 of 5

Well, I've worked with Pastry Pride a ton.  But this wedding cake is for my son and is actually going to be outside in the shade, so I want to be extra sure I have my all cake ducks lined up in a row.  Here's my thoughts--any input would be appreciated!  The cake will be 4 tiers all stacked.  All carrot cake with cream cheese buttercream/filling--heavy.  Rustic wedding, so the outside will be rough iced--preferably with Pastry Pride.  Fresh flowers from the florist.  Since I'm the groom's mom, I'm thinking I'll put together the cake tiers on Friday and put them in the freezer.  Saturday early afternoon I'll take them out and deliver and stack at the venue around 3:00/3:30 (4:30 ceremony).  Temp that day might be around 90 degrees with a little more humidity than we usually have here in Northern California.  So my question is this--going from freezer to a warm but shady outdoor gazebo, would the cake wilt?  I could freeze the cakes with just the filling then rough ice with the Pastry Pride the morning of the wedding?  Would buttercream (I use 1/2 butter, 1/2 HR shortening) be better?  I just need to plan my time--and the way the cake will thaw--carefully!  Thoughts?   

4 replies
charlieswagon Posted 8 Jul 2015 , 9:43pm
post #2 of 5

Hi there.  I'm not familiar with Pastry Pride (please enlighten me about this product & how you use it) and I too live in a hot & humid climate which causes me lots of stress when delivering cakes during the summer months.  So, I've adapted to using either an all-shortening recipe for icing, whipped ganache or fondant to cover my cakes.  I've combined freezing and using

  1. a partial butter & shortening formula
  2. Part margarine & shortening, 
  3. Equal parts butter, shortening & even gelatin...no success was achieved!  I was so discouraged that I almost gave up.  But, "Thank The Lord" I have found the all-shortening icing to be more reliable (in the heat) than butter, margarine, cream cheese, meringue icings, ganache, etc...  I've also found that bringing the cakes up to room temperature and holding them (iced & at room temp for a few hours before setup) keeps them from wilting/sagging/melting - and totally destroying my confidence as a professional baker.  This is what works for me.  Good luck!


tripleE Posted 9 Jul 2015 , 4:11am
post #3 of 5

Thanks!  I like all your thoughts!  Pastry Pride is a frozen, non-dairy liquid you get at Smart and Final (at least around here, in northern California).  You thaw it under refrigeration then whip in the mixer.  It's like a glorified Cool Whip, but more firm.  I don't use it as much as I used to, but I thought it would go well with the carrot cake--lighten it up a bit.  I actually decided to do a trial cake (had a spare cake in the freezer and whipped Pastry Pride in the fridge already).  Tomorrow I'll take it out of the freezer to see how it does outside.  I'm thinking, though, that your idea to use all shortening might be the way to go.  Do you use high ratio or regular?  Thanks, again!

doramoreno62 Posted 9 Jul 2015 , 4:45am
post #4 of 5

I use PP on 100% of my cakes and never have any problems. And I live in the Inland Empire which is close to the desert! Just don't leave it in direct sunlight and you should have no problems

Cakemom21 Posted 9 Jul 2015 , 6:20pm
post #5 of 5


Quote by @doramoreno62 on 13 hours ago

I use PP on 100% of my cakes and never have any problems. And I live in the Inland Empire which is close to the desert! Just don't leave it in direct sunlight and you should have no problems

Thanks for the info. I also live in the Inland Empire and love using Pastry Pride. I didn't know how it would do if the cake has to sit outside for a while (even in the shade). Good to know.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%