Making Cake In Advance

Baking By samho21 Updated 6 Jul 2015 , 10:45pm by SquirrellyCakes

samho21 Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 4:16pm
post #1 of 10

Hi, I'm planning to make a cake for my dad's birthday, but will actually be traveling on the date of the party. Is it possible to make and frost a cake and keep it for about 10 days until serving? maybe fondant? also suggestions for fillings (obviously not fresh fruit, but maybe white chocolate ganache?) any tips would be much appreciated. 

thanks!

9 replies
Claire138 Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 5:15pm
post #2 of 10

10 days in advance is a long time for it to stay fresh. Three or max four days before is the earliest I'd do it; even without fresh fruit. Maybe someone else can help. I've never had the guts to freeze just to see if it comes out ok but I know there are those that do so maybe that's the way to go. Good luck

jchuck Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 5:49pm
post #3 of 10

A unrefridgerated cake, uncut, can stay fresh, minimum of 4-5 days. I wouldn't chance it any longer than that. Firstly, bacteria, secondly, just staying fresh. You  can freeze a buttercream covered or fondant covered cake for up to a month if it's well wrapped in plastic wrap & tin foil/plastic container.  Don't add any fondant decorations if freezing, like flowers, they won't hold up. Add later when cake has thawed. Takes a couple of hours for a bc covered cake to come back to room temperature. If it's fondant covered, place in a box lined with newspaper, let it sit, it will "sweat". Don't touch it, or you will leave marks. Eventuality , condensation will disappear, and fondant will dry out. 

Hope this helps.

MacsMom Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 7:17pm
post #4 of 10

Freeze it! I have frozen several fondant covered, fondant decorated cakes, including flowers. The trick is to keep it in a cardboard box, then thaw it overnight (or even 2 days in advance) in the fridge, still in the box. Thawing in the fridge prevents too much condensation form building up too quickly, which will make the cake overly wet. 

When fondant is refrigerated, it will develop condensation when brought to room temp, but it dries within 1 to 2 hours (don't touch it while it's sticky). If for some reason my fondant hasn't dried quickly enough (humid, raining outside), I use a hairdryer to speed things along.

Bonus: Freezing fondant covered cakes tends to make them more moist, because the fondant traps the moisture inside as the ice-crystals melt. Two of my customers even request that I freeze their cakes, now. (I've had to freeze theirs because of going on vacation and they insisted that I make them before I left). 

jchuck Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 7:31pm
post #5 of 10

Yes MacsMom

Freezing cakes really does make for a nice moist cake. Iv'e been baking my cakes ahead for years. Iced/covered and just plain no icing, well wrapped, to be decorated later. I've frozen a fondant covered cake, but never with all it's embellishments, like flowers. Partly due to space in my freezer, partly not wanting any delicate gumpaste/fondant decorations too be ruined/broken. 

samho21 Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 9:17pm
post #6 of 10

Thanks so much, freezing the cake sounds like a good idea, now just to make enough space in the freezer for the cake! 

So just to clarify, make and frost the cake, if fondant then keep in cardboard box and defrost in box too, if buttercream then cover in cling film and freeze and remove cling film to defrost in fridge? 


Thanks :) 

maybenot Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 9:31pm
post #7 of 10

You can freeze a fully decorated fondant or buttercream decorated cake.

Box the completed cake in a cardboard box.  Cover the box in several layers of saran wrap and a layer of foil.  24 hrs. before serving, place the still wrapped box in the refrigerator.  A few hours before serving, place the still wrapped box on the counter to come to room temp.  Right before serving, remove the wrapping & box.  The cake will look and taste like the day it was made.  Any condensation will have gone to the box and it will likely feel damp.


This cake was handled this way.  No bleeding of the ruby fondant damask and no marred or soggy fondant.

benison+cake_9+-+Copy.jpg

maybenot Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 9:38pm
post #8 of 10

For the record:  I HATE THE NEW CAKE CENTRAL FORMAT

I tried to edit my post, but it won't allow me to do that.

Box the completed cake in a cardboard box.  Cover the box in several layers of saran wrap and a layer of foil.  24 hrs. before serving, place the still wrapped box in the refrigerator.  A few hours before serving, place the still wrapped box on the counter to come to room temp.  Right before serving, remove the wrapping & box.  The cake will look and taste like the day it was made.  Any condensation will have gone to the box and it will likely feel damp.
Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/823433/making-cake-in-advance#post_7629204#fyopWP2h1iBuy5Gk.99

After wrapping the box, place it in the freezer until 24 hrs. before serving.  Then place wrapped box in the refrigerator.

Box the completed cake in a cardboard box.  Cover the box in several layers of saran wrap and a layer of foil.  24 hrs. before serving, place the still wrapped box in the refrigerator.  A few hours before serving, place the still wrapped box on the counter to come to room temp.  Right before serving, remove the wrapping & box.  The cake will look and taste like the day it was made.  Any condensation will have gone to the box and it will likely feel damp
Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/823433/making-cake-in-advance#post_7629204#fyopWP2h1iBuy5Gk.99
Box the completed cake in a cardboard box.  Cover the box in several layers of saran wrap and a layer of foil.  24 hrs. before serving, place the still wrapped box in the refrigerator.  A few hours before serving, place the still wrapped box on the counter to come to room temp.  Right before serving, remove the wrapping & box.  The cake will look and taste like the day it was made.  Any condensation will have gone to the box and it will likely feel damp.
Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/823433/making-cake-in-advance#hMm9TEPRsD05vG7G.99

jchuck Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 10:07pm
post #9 of 10

I don't have room in my fridge for a large box for defrosting purposes.  I've  just always placed the box on the kitchen counter, the morning of being needed, removed the plastic wrap and tin foil so condensation can escape. of course the newspaper and cardboard box will absorb all of the moisture from the fondant.  If it's buttercream, you don't have to do anything extraordinary, just remove saran and foil,  let it sit until it comes to room temperature. Always worked for me....  :o)

SquirrellyCakes Posted 6 Jul 2015 , 10:45pm
post #10 of 10

When I freeze a buttercream iced cake, I freeze in a box and bag the box in an unscented garbage bag.  When I defrost, I defrost at room temperature of 70F/20C leaving it in the bagged box.

A buttercream with at least half butter and half shortening as opposed to only shortening and no butter, remains soft when defrosted. I find all shortening icings get a bit crusty or dry once frozen.


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