Painting On Fondant

Decorating By NanHolland Updated 9 May 2015 , 7:27pm by Bogginboy

NanHolland Posted 5 May 2015 , 1:58am
post #1 of 12

Looking for some advice as to what I am doing wrong when attempting to paint on fondant . Whenever I attempt to paint on fondant I have issues with the color not staying  on the fondant. It seems to separate  and sometimes completely disappear. What am I doing wrong? 



11 replies
reginaherrin Posted 5 May 2015 , 2:39am
post #2 of 12

How are you painting it on?  You should be mixing the color with a clear alcohol or extract, I use vodka.  Make sure its not too liquidy/runny when you mix it and just paint it on. 

NanHolland Posted 5 May 2015 , 2:48am
post #3 of 12

Thank you for your reply, I do use vodka that's why I am so puzzled with my outcome. I was wondering if maybe I needed to prep my fondant in any way before I applied the paint.

reginaherrin Posted 5 May 2015 , 2:59am
post #4 of 12

There's not really anything you can prep to paint, you don't want a wet surface or anything, its got to be completely dry.  Hard to know for sure but I'm thinking either you are not adding enough petal dust to the vodka so that it is too thin or there is something wrong with your petal dust. 

Frank68 Posted 5 May 2015 , 3:08am
post #5 of 12

Nanholland, I don't think I've ever painted on a cake with a petal dust mixture. I use either a gel color/vodka combination or straight airbrush color.  Petal dust is not concentrated enough (or you would need a ton of it) to look right. If you want to highlight what you've painted after the fact, then apply dry petal dust on top of what you've already painted.


The trees on this cake were painted with non diluted super black airbrush color, using a very thin paintbrush: http://www.sweettierscakery.com/#!Teen%20Wolf%20Birthday%20Cake/zoom/c18h4/imageevu

The castle in the background was diluted with vodka to get a shade of grey. You can basically use any colors that way, and even mix.


Hope that helps,

Frank




NanHolland Posted 5 May 2015 , 11:41pm
post #6 of 12

Thank you Frank and Reginaherrin for your help. I am definitely going to try making my paint thicker to see if that helps. I was also wondering if it could be a possibility that having shortening on my hands when I knead my fondant could be causing my problem?

NanHolland Posted 5 May 2015 , 11:41pm
post #7 of 12

Thank you Frank and Reginaherrin for your help. I am definitely going to try making my paint thicker to see if that helps. I was also wondering if it could be a possibility that having shortening on my hands when I knead my fondant could be causing my problem?

Bogginboy Posted 6 May 2015 , 12:15am
post #8 of 12

Shortening is oily so that could be a problem but I've found you can actually use lemon juice instead of alcohol as it evaporates fast also and that's the only reason why they say to use alcohol instead of just water but use bottled lemon juice as it's more concentrated

pastrypet Posted 7 May 2015 , 11:33pm
post #9 of 12

In my experience, lemon juice does not dry nearly fast enough. If you don't want to use vodka, you can use lemon extract.

CoinUK Posted 8 May 2015 , 11:04pm
post #10 of 12

I've tried it with both vodka and lemon juice and I find the lemon juice dries much more sticky than the vodka.

Vodka is more expensive, but a little goes a looong way. I've used it two or three times now and it's gotten better each time. It's worth practising with some off cut fondant, adjusting the thickness to how you want it.

costumeczar Posted 9 May 2015 , 12:38am
post #11 of 12

Use airbrush color and don't bother diluting it if you can help it, but if you do, use vodka. Sometimes if there's shortening on the surface, like was mentioned before, that can make the color bead up because you're basically trying to paint a water-based paint on top of an oil.

 You can use titanium dioxide, which is the white food color, as a base to make paint. You can also mix shortening or icing with petal dusts or powder colors to make an oil-based paint.

 Here are some articles I've put together about painting on cakes that could be helpful.  http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2013/05/tips-for-painting-on-cakes.html

 http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2010/09/painting-on-wedding-cakes.html

 http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2014/10/how-to-make-opaque-paint-for-gumpaste.html

Bogginboy Posted 9 May 2015 , 7:27pm
post #12 of 12

well speaking as someone who doesnt like to us any product with alcohol in it for food or cake decorating (i even use imitation vanilla) then i dont mind waiting the extra little bit for the lemon juice to dry it may take longer but it still doesnt end up soggy like if you used water

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