Need A Good Vanilla Cupcake Recipe That Employs Reverse Creaming Process!

Baking By jensabaker Updated 10 May 2015 , 12:35am by tastefullysweet

jensabaker Posted 28 Apr 2015 , 8:10pm
post #1 of 16

Hi all,


I bought the Beyond Buttercream recipe to be able to make awesome cupcakes, only to find out after I bought it that it's not conducive to making great cupcakes....I believe it says that they don't really make that good cupcake dome.  I will say that I did love the moistness (is that a word?) and the taste.  If I was trying to be awesome at making cakes, I would be very happy right now.  But I am trying to make cupcakes.  They came out of the oven basically shrunken... they drew the wrappers in with them and were sort of like straight up tiny columns.  I have emailed Jennifer at Beyond Buttercream and am hoping she can help (Just emailed her...so she hasn't had a chance to reply) but I'm needing to make cupcakes this week so was hoping to get some help here as well.

I had posted on here about a month or so ago needing a good vanilla cupcake recipe.  I thought I was doing everything right when trying out these recipes...now, having tried Jennifer's recipe I think I may have been over-mixing before.  I had never tried a cake using the reverse creaming process until I tried hers and the cakes came out so moist!  Finally!  BUT...they not only didn't have domes...they were all straight across on the top...they just pulled inwards to where they were so tiny.

I asked Jennifer with BB to help if she can because I would ultimately like this recipe to work for me.  But I'd also like to hear from you all..if you have had good results with a recipe that employs reverse creaming for cupcakes.


Thank you!


15 replies
jensabaker Posted 28 Apr 2015 , 8:27pm
post #2 of 16

Oh boy.  In researching this on the CC site, I found this:  


<<In the reverse creaming process.. "You don't do the fat and sugar thing together, which tears millions of holes into the fat, creating lift."
Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/750937/can-i-use-the-reverse-creaming-method-with-any-recipe#7pQ6u7oFXhUFoebj.99 >>


I'm hoping this isn't correct.  I think the reverse creaming process is the only thing that's kept me from turning out a dry cake so I hope this doesn't mean it's not possible to use it to achieve a good cupcake with a nice dome.

Pastrybaglady Posted 28 Apr 2015 , 11:43pm
post #3 of 16

From my personal misadventures with vanilla cake and cupcakes I believe cupcakes are best served by using an all purpose flour mix rather than all cake flour.  I took a basic traditional yellow cake recipe with all purpose flour and replaced 1/3 of it with cake flour.  I find this gives you the lift and stability of all purpose with some of the tender softness of cake flour.  I still use reverse creaming and get a moderately rounded top.

imagenthatnj Posted 29 Apr 2015 , 3:48am
post #4 of 16

I've used the vanilla buttercream recipe from Sky High for years for cakes and cupcakes. It's everyone's in my family favorite recipe, so I can't change it! I do have to say that my cupcakes are flat on top, but that's how I would rather have them. That's also the base cake for my sister's business in South America, now. I have to send her powdered buttermilk from the States.

It's here, and here and here...

http://sweetapolita.com/2011/05/vanilla-buttermilk-cake-with-instant-fudge-frosting/

http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/07/project-wedding-cake-the-cake-is-baked/

http://awhiskandaspoon.com/2009/05/28/vanilla-buttermilk-cake-with-vanilla-swiss-meringue-buttercream/




jensabaker Posted 29 Apr 2015 , 3:18pm
post #5 of 16

Pastrybaglady, thank you for the info.  I was under the impression that the reverse creaming process only worked because you were using cake flour...that if you mixed it that long with AP flour, it would form too much gluten.  Is this not the case?  If it's not the case I wonder if I could just modify the Beyond Buttercream recipe the way you did, replacing some of the cake flour with AP to get some more lift.  Without giving too many details on her recipe, she has you blend for over a minute and says that it's okay because you're using cake flour.  How long do you mix your recipe once you have your flour mixture in? 


Imagenthatnj, Thank you for the recipes.  I like a little bit of a dome on my cupcakes since I like a bit more cake than icing while still looking "full" if that makes sense.  I may end up trying them anyway, though!  Thanks again!

imagenthatnj Posted 29 Apr 2015 , 6:45pm
post #6 of 16

One day, when I have time, I will play with temperatures and how full the liner is...

I bought Beyond Buttercream recipes a year ago, and I still haven't made any of them!!

http://www.handletheheat.com/ultimate-cupcake-guide/

http://www.kellyneil.com/kellyneilcom/2011/4/5/vanilla-bean-buttercream-dream-aka-nanny-burkes-buttercream.html

(she gets domed cupcakes and flat ones by accident at the very end of her post)

I'm now wondering what my sister gets. She doesn't have cake flour of course, so for the Sky High recipe she makes fake cake flour by adding potato starch to it.

People have success with a higher starting temperature for pre-heating, then lowering it. I just never tried it.

jensabaker Posted 29 Apr 2015 , 10:55pm
post #7 of 16

Well if you are a cake baker, her vanilla cake recipe with 20 some odd variations is great!  I made half a batch of vanilla cupcakes and half a batch of lemon (just added the paste/emulsions at the end) and they were great.  Worth the money if you're making cake!

rychevamp Posted 29 Apr 2015 , 11:25pm
post #8 of 16

From my experience with the reverse creaming method, most recipes say beat until light and fluffy, 2 mins or however long, before adding the liquids, etc. And when I've done this, cupcakes end up just like you described.  And even some of the cake layers have caved in sides.

I don't know Beyond Buttercream's recipe and how long it's mixed, but you should try It without as much mixing.

I make Rose Levy Beranbaum's almond cake, and I did beat it the amount of time stated, and ugly cupcakes happened.  With less mixing, beautiful domed cupcakes with no shrinkage.

Might be worth a shot.

Pastrybaglady Posted 30 Apr 2015 , 8:25am
post #9 of 16


Quote by @jensabaker on 16 hours ago

Pastrybaglady, thank you for the info.  I was under the impression that the reverse creaming process only worked because you were using cake flour...that if you mixed it that long with AP flour, it would form too much gluten.  Is this not the case?  If it's not the case I wonder if I could just modify the Beyond Buttercream recipe the way you did, replacing some of the cake flour with AP to get some more lift.  Without giving too many details on her recipe, she has you blend for over a minute and says that it's okay because you're using cake flour.  How long do you mix your recipe once you have your flour mixture in?

Reverse creaming is supposed to prevent the gluten from forming by "sealing" the flour with the butter, so it should still work with all purpose flour.  When I add the butter to the dry ingredients I mix on low until the butter seems to be evenly distributed.  I add the milk in a slow steady stream with the mixer still on low.  I add the eggs one at a time mixing still on low.  Once all the ingredients are in the bowl I turn up the speed to medium and beat for about 30 seconds and I'm done.

R



Mannabev Posted 30 Apr 2015 , 11:59pm
post #10 of 16

http://sweetapolita.com/2011/07/fluffy-vanilla-cake-with-whipped-vanilla-bean-frosting/


I have used this recipe for cupcakes and they domed beautifully. is this the reverse creaming method? I don't know the technical term for this method, but I think it describes it well  

jensabaker Posted 1 May 2015 , 1:33pm
post #11 of 16

mannabev, thank you.  I looked at the sweetapolita recipe and while it looks to me like that is reverse creaming, it appears she likes a very light and airy cake...one that replicates a box mix... I like a bit more dense cake...so I'm looking for that balance of dense yet moist with a small dome.  But if you like very fluffy cake that one looks like it would be great!  That picture definitely tempted me!

rychevamp,  I have not yet tried Rose Levy Beranbaum's cake.  Is it somewhat dense?  Is the almond cake a good base for other flavors (lemon, coconut, chocolate)?

pastrybaglady, It looks like I will yet again have to keep experimenting.  Thank you for your continued help.

SquirrellyCakes Posted 1 May 2015 , 2:59pm
post #12 of 16

This isn't a reverse creaming method but it does make for dense moist cupcakes.  I also used this recipe times 1 1/2, to make a Minion cake for my granddaughter, so it supports fondant and weight.

The trick with many regular method recipes -to avoid gluten overwork - is to really cream your butter and sugar together for about 10 minutes.  Once you add the flour, mix a minimal amount of time. The longer you mix flour once liquid is added, the more you risk over developing the gluten.

I think  I obtained this recipe from a Wilton site member who had issues with it and asked me to test it.  I use it all the time. I believe I tweaked it a bit and changed the method to my usual method. You will get slight rounded domes but you are going to have to experiment with your tins to see how much batter and how many cupcakes you will get from a recipe as all tins are slightly different.   I get about 24.  If you use too much batter you will get too much of a muffin top;  too little will result in "flat tops".


Vanilla Cupcakes

Pre-heat oven to either 350 or 375 .  At 350 cupcakes will take about 21 to  23 minutes. At 375 they will take 15 to 18 minutes. Bake with rack set at the middle of oven.  I bake 1 dozen at a time leaving the second dozen at room temperature of 70 f while first dozen is in oven.  I am not a fan of convection baking or baking cakes or cookies on more than one rack but that is just my preference.

INGREDIENTS

2 1/2 cups of all- purpose flour

2 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt (if using salted butter, omit salt)

2/3 cup of unsalted butter (I use cold from refrigerator)

1 3/4 cup granulated sugar (I use superfine but regular works fine)

2 large eggs

1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

1 1/4 cup whole fat milk (not 2% or 1% or skim)

METHOD

Using paddle attachment,  beat cold butter until softened.  Gradually add sugar and beat on medium for 10 minutes.  Add eggs, one at a time beating 30 seconds on medium after each egg is added, scraping down bowl to incorporate eggs well.  Add vanilla to milk and set aside.  In separate bowl, stir flour, baking powder and salt together.  Beginning and ending with flour mixture - make 3 dry and 2 liquid additions - mixing only until incorporated, scraping down bottom and sides of bowl.  Fill cupcake paper lined cupcake tins about 2/3 full.  Bake as per above.  Cool before frosting.




rychevamp Posted 1 May 2015 , 11:19pm
post #13 of 16


Quote by @jensabaker on 9 hours ago

mannabev, thank you.  I looked at the sweetapolita recipe and while it looks to me like that is reverse creaming, it appears she likes a very light and airy cake...one that replicates a box mix... I like a bit more dense cake...so I'm looking for that balance of dense yet moist with a small dome.  But if you like very fluffy cake that one looks like it would be great!  That picture definitely tempted me!

rychevamp,  I have not yet tried Rose Levy Beranbaum's cake.  Is it somewhat dense?  Is the almond cake a good base for other flavors (lemon, coconut, chocolate)?

pastrybaglady, It looks like I will yet again have to keep experimenting.  Thank you for your continued help.

The almond cake is very soft right after it is made, but I usually chill it before working with it and it firms up.  It is somewhat dense the day after. It holds up well it a tiered cake.

I have left the almonds out and made it into lemon, orange, plain.  She says it is a variation of her downy butter cake, so you could look at that one If you have the Cake Bible.

Kind of a long explanation, but I had been making the almond cake for a while. Mixing the butter and sour cream into the dry ingredients until completely incorporated and smooth (no lumps of butter,etc). Then I happen to look at the recipe again, and it said beat it 1 1/2-2 mins. I thought I hadn't been making it right.  So, I tried it, and my cupcakes shrank, my cakes collapsed on the sides or the tops had blow outs.  So, I just went back to my normal method and it's fine. 

So, I don't know if it's just me, if using the scraper beater has anything to do with it, whatever.  I've just found beating them less works for me.

Kathy107 Posted 8 May 2015 , 2:59pm
post #14 of 16

Pour your batter into the cupcake tins and leave sitting on table for 20 minutes or so and then put into the oven.  Leaving them sitting first will create the dome your are looking for. 

Rfisher Posted 8 May 2015 , 6:11pm
post #15 of 16

Give a try RLB's Perfect Pound Cake from the Cake Bible as cupcakes. I get 10 cc with standard base/extra tall liner from a batch.

tastefullysweet Posted 10 May 2015 , 12:35am
post #16 of 16

I'm using the basic cupcake recipe by America's Test Kitchen: it is a dump and mix method, but gives you a nice sturdy cupcake, and it domes just right: both the regular size and the mini size. It also makes an even dozen, so easy to scale the recipe for whatever amount you need. I use two whole eggs usually instead of 1 egg and 2 yolks, and it still works great!

I have their book, but I found the recipe online, here it is!
http://www.kcet.org/living/food/the-public-kitchen/yellow-cupcakes-with-chocolate-ganache-frosting.html

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