Scratch Or Mix?

Baking By CakeCulture101 Updated 22 Apr 2015 , 7:40am by julia1812

CakeCulture101 Posted 13 Apr 2015 , 3:58pm
post #1 of 22

Hello fellow camers n bakers!!


I am in the process of starting my home based custom cake business and woult like to get some insight from all of you wonderfully talented people! But on the impending launch date I'm having a serious internal conflict of deciding wether or not I should use scratch recipes or cake mixes. I would love to hear from both sides on the pro's and con's of using either or. I would love the clout of being an all scratch baker but the ease and dependability of mixes is too tempting! Please help!!

PS.....if you have any good scratch or mix recipes for a vanilla and chocolate cake that is (a) carvable cake that is sturdy and (b) a tender moist choc & vanilla cake for frosting in BC or covering in fondant for reg. Non-sculpted cakes.

Thank you all

21 replies
CakeCulture101 Posted 13 Apr 2015 , 6:26pm
post #2 of 22

**cakers and bakers 

MBalaska Posted 13 Apr 2015 , 7:58pm
post #3 of 22

If the search was working you could read hundreds of very interesting & informative threads on this subject.

It's a toss up, split decision, widely debated issue like 'Coke or Pepsi', 'Ford or Chevy', 'McDonalds or Burger King" the decision is completely yours to make.  Best Wishes and much success in your business!

Jedi Knight Posted 13 Apr 2015 , 9:50pm
post #4 of 22

You have an impending opening date, but you don't have any recipes in place?

CakeCulture101 Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 12:40am
post #5 of 22

Ok let me clarify, I don't have a concrete opening date as of yet, more like a timeframe I'm looking at. I have some recipes but I just wanted the input as to what do you all like best

kakeladi Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 2:27am
post #6 of 22

I had a wonderful successful bakery using mixes. 

As the other posters have said it is entirely up to you.  If you have success with scratch then by all means go with that.  If you have repeat customers using mixes why change what is not broken :)  In the past some posters have said they use both - scratch for some flavors and mix for others.  Y ou might want to consider that.

kakeladi Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 2:33am
post #7 of 22
have any good scratch or mix recipes for a vanilla and chocolate cake that is (a) carvable cake that is sturdy and (b) a tender moist choc & vanilla cake for frosting in BC or covering in fondant for reg. Non-sculpted cakes.
Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/794798/scratch-or-mix#post_7592910#wZlGibfgo8xJRBIR.99

Can't quote by copy and paste :(  Re: recipes for chocolate and vanilla cakes that are good for carving etc.........

My *original* WASC cake recipe is perfect for both a moist cake and for carving.   It starts with a mix in *any* flavor you want then add flour, sugar, an extra egg and sour cream.  Sooooo perfect for any thing you want to do with it.

And the "2 of everything icing" is the perfect recipe for icing any cake. 

Both are posted in the recipe section.

if you have any good scratch or mix recipes for a vanilla and chocolate cake that is (a) carvable cake that is sturdy and (b) a tender moist choc & vanilla cake for frosting in BC or covering in fondant for reg. Non-sculpted cakes.
Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/794798/scratch-or-mix#post_7592910#wZlGibfgo8xJRBIR.99
dm321 Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 4:20am
post #8 of 22

kakeladi, what is 2 of everything icing? i tried to search for it in the recipes, but cant get anything to come up...

toshascc Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 5:28am
post #9 of 22

I make everything from scratch right down to my fondant, I feel like people come to a home based baker for from scratch recipes. I like hearing this tastes just like my grandmas cake or icing

CakeCulture101 Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 10:41am
post #10 of 22

Thanks so much guys! Will definitely try WASC. And what is the 2 of everything icing? Sounds interesting!!

bakingfordozens Posted 16 Apr 2015 , 1:03am
post #11 of 22

Cakeculture101, I had the exact same debate with myself when I was planning my home bakery business! In the end, I decided to do almost everything from scratch. Scratch cakes, scratch frostings, scratch fondant, scratch piping gel, well, you get the idea. I decided on this because, though I LOVE a good box mix (like Duncan Hines or Pillsbury) because of their easy, speed, even results, and family memories, I decided that I enjoyed baking too much to not challenge myself to do things from scratch. I love finding recipes and modifying them to my own style and tastes, and that is so much easier to do when you know exactly what goes in to you cake. 


So, I decided scratch because of the challenge and being in control of my product. Plus, more time in the kitchen is never a bad thing in my opinion! ;)

Pastrybaglady Posted 16 Apr 2015 , 4:14am
post #12 of 22

If you want to claim scratch but want the ease of a mix, early in the week pre-measure the dry ingredients and keep them in well labelled ziplocks.  I do this when I've got a lot of different projects due at the same time.  Sometimes I'll even bottle up the wet ingredients to make things that much easier for myself.  But you do need to decide and lock down your recipes.  Make sure you have a killer white/vanilla cake, because you're going to be making it a LOT, along with chocolate and red velvet.

julia1812 Posted 16 Apr 2015 , 10:59am
post #13 of 22

 

Quote by @toshascc on 2 days ago

I make everything from scratch right down to my fondant, I feel like people come to a home based baker for from scratch recipes. I like hearing this tastes just like my grandmas cake or icing

  My words!

toshascc Posted 20 Apr 2015 , 6:58pm
post #14 of 22

Your words?

julia1812 Posted 20 Apr 2015 , 7:24pm
post #15 of 22

As in "I like hearing this tastes just like my grandmas cake or icing
" is what i always say too

toshascc Posted 20 Apr 2015 , 7:58pm
post #16 of 22

Oh gotcha 

NoR334 Posted 20 Apr 2015 , 8:39pm
post #17 of 22

I use Betty Crocker Pound cake mix. It is not sold in all grocery stores and it costs about $2.50 a box but it is very good and a sturdy cake that doesn't fall apart so its good for carving and slicing layers. I add milk instead of water when I use cake mix and a little more vanilla extract. That makes it taste richer. I could probably save more money by making it from scratch but I am usually so pressed for time and this cake always turns out great. I always make my own frosting. Whipped cream with Dr. Oetker sahnsteif(stabilizer avail on Amazon) and a buttercream/cream cheese hybrid are my most popular.

kakeladi Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 4:04pm
post #18 of 22

Sorry it has taken me so long to reply.....haven't seen the requests for the "2 of everything icing" recipe so here it is;

2 cups of shortening (I always use Crisco)

2 cups of butter (no substitutes)

2 pounds of powdered sugar

2 TABLEspoons flavoring (*see note at end of recipe)

2 shakes of salt (about 1/4 teaspoon)

Cream shortening and butter together WELL (about 10 minutes on low to med speed of mixer - I use a KitchenAid on low).  Add about 1/3 of the sugar and continue mixing another 10 minutes.  Add another 3rd of the sugar with the flavoring and salt again continue to mix another 10 minutes then add the last of the sugar and mix another 10 minutes on low.  This buttercream icing does NOT crust.  If you want it to crust reduce either the butter or shortening by 1 cup OR each by 1/2 cup. 


*Note: Flavoring  can be *ANY!* you want.  I prefer to use a combination of vanilla, butter and almond.  I mixed that in a large combination - 1 part vanilla extract; 1/2 part butter flavoring and 1/4 part almond extract.  A "part" is any measure you want to use be it teaspoon, Tablespoon, cup, quart or other matters not just keep the 1, 1/2, 1/4 ratio.  A combination of 3 flavors give a wonderful complex taste rather than using just straight vanilla.   Some of my students did not like almond so they sub'd lemon and were happy.   Maybe try hazelnut?  Don't be afraid to experiment  some :)


Jedi Knight Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 5:08pm
post #19 of 22

I'd close up shop before I'd use a box mix OR Criscocream.

kakeladi Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 10:39pm
post #20 of 22

Jedi - that's your opinion and you are entitled to it.  Just don't insist that every one has to do what you do.  There is room for each of us in this world.

Jedi Knight Posted 22 Apr 2015 , 2:36am
post #21 of 22

What?


I've just re-read my post and, for the life of me, cannot find any reference anywhere insisting that "everyone has to do what I do".

The question is scratch or mix, and I gave my opinion, just like everyone else in the thread. My opinion should, really, mean nothing to anyone on here. I surely don't (and won't) let the opinions of random, unknown Internet people affect me.

Those people who produce a substandard product shouldn't feel too badly as I'm sure there are clients out there who like that sort of thing.

At the end of the day, a cake can never be more than the sum of its ingredients.

julia1812 Posted 22 Apr 2015 , 7:40am
post #22 of 22

I don't know what you mean by substandard? A box mix isn't substandard for me although I don't use any. But a cake can not only judged by the cake alone. There are so many other things which one needs to consider, like making fillings, buttercream, ganache etc, then also the time and skill to decorate a cake. Some might not be a talented baker, but can be outstanding in sculpting, or making edible flowers or something. Other people are maybe technically very good, but have no talent when decorating. And also as above mentioned, baking cakes from scratch takes time=adds costs to the finished product and or makes the production of many cakes per day impossible. I find it interesting to see why people make one choice or another, but at the end of the day - like you said, everyone needs to make their own decision.

 

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